Trauma https://mag.uchicago.edu/tags/trauma en Taking on trauma https://mag.uchicago.edu/science-medicine/taking-trauma <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/18Fall_O%27Neill_TraumaCenter.jpg" width="2000" height="1000" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/admin" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">admin</span></span> <span>Fri, 11/09/2018 - 12:43</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>The doctors who joined the trauma team are united by a desire to address the root causes of violence, not just its effects. Left to right: trauma surgeons Kenneth Wilson, David Hampton, Priya Prakash, Selwyn O. Rogers Jr., Jennifer Cone, and Peter Bendix. (UChicago Medicine)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/brooke-e-oneill-am04"> <a href="/author/brooke-e-oneill-am04"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Brooke E. O’Neill, AM’04</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/university-chicago-magazine" hreflang="en">The University of Chicago Magazine</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item">Fall/18</div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>By treating violence as a public health issue, UChicago Medicine trauma experts seek to transform care on Chicago’s South Side.</p></div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>“Obviously it’s a huge job to stand up a level I trauma center from the ground up,” says <strong>Selwyn O. Rogers Jr.</strong>, director of the University of Chicago Medicine’s new level I adult trauma center and chief of trauma and acute care surgery. “But it can’t be the only solution.” UChicago Medicine began providing adult trauma services in May and averaged nine patients a day from May 1 to September 30.</p> <p>For Rogers, filling the 27-year absence of adult trauma care on Chicago’s South Side is part of a much larger mission: to reduce the violence that has left residents devastated and a generation traumatized. Although most of the patients UChicago Medicine treats won’t be gunshot victims—the most common life-threatening injuries that bring people to any trauma center are car accidents and falls—many will be.</p> <p>“If we don’t address violence as a public health issue,” Rogers says, “and deal with its root causes—the impact of trauma over the life cycle, the lived experiences of communities that are chronically disinvested in, and the resulting poverty, discrimination, and lack of economic opportunity—we will continue to see the problem of intentional violence manifest itself.”</p> <p>Joining Rogers’s trauma surgery team this year are five professionals from cities such as Flint, Michigan; Los Angeles; and Cleveland, all besieged by violence of their own. Most have come to the South Side frustrated by what they see as a disconnect between what they do in the operating room and the situations that bring patients there in the first place.</p> <p>“It’s very easy for us as trauma surgeons to just operate on people, take care of them in the ICU, and leave it at that,” says <strong>Jennifer Cone</strong>, a Chicago native who completed her surgical fellowship at Los Angeles County Medical Center. “But that’s not fixing anything when we get the same patients in over and over.”</p> <p>Military veteran <strong>Kenneth Wilson</strong> agrees. “My entire surgical career I’ve struggled with the fact that we’ve gotten very good at fixing the physiology as a consequence of trauma—and often pat ourselves on the back—but we’ve never tackled the psychology of what gets you into that situation.”</p> <p>Over the past two decades, local leaders have fought hard to bring adult trauma care to the South Side and to the University. The outcry reached fever pitch in August 2010 when Damian Turner, an 18-year-old activist, was gunned down in a drive-by shooting several blocks from the UChicago Medicine campus. Paramedics took him to the nearest adult trauma center, more than nine miles away. According to news reports, he was pronounced dead about 90 minutes after the shooting.</p> <p>“There was a lot of frustration and anger within the community,” says Rogers, who came to Chicago in 2017 from the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston, where he served as vice president and chief medical officer. Once UChicago Medicine made the decision to offer adult trauma services, however, residents fueled its creation with “incredible passion.” More than 100 individuals applied to join UChicago Medicine’s 20-person Community Advisory Council, a task force designed to keep community health needs at the forefront.</p> <p>Holistic care is critical. “Obviously, we’ll focus on restoring people’s physiology,” Rogers says, “but entry starts off with a conversation, not a judgment. A few simple words: ‘How can I help?’”</p> <p>It’s a fleeting moment that can be transformative, particularly for someone who’s grown up in a traumatic environment.</p> <p>“Many of these kids coming in are surrounded by neighborhood violence, many suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder,” says <strong>Debra Allen</strong>, a registered nurse and clinical director of trauma services. “There is a moment of opportunity—and this is rare in a person’s life—where we can change the path they’re on. One of those moments is when people are injured.”</p> <p>The trauma center’s violence recovery program has forged connections with local organizations including Chicago Survivors, the Heartland Alliance, and the YMCA. In late 2017 the trauma team and University faculty from medicine, law, and history came together with more than 100 community partners to begin shaping a hospital-based violence recovery program designed for the South Side.</p> <p>Mental wellness emerged as a key focus. “We know that after trauma, it doesn’t just affect the individual who has been traumatized, but also close contacts and friends,” Rogers says. He pointed to one heartbreaking example among far too many: the deaths of two young South Side girls, Takiya Holmes, 11, and Kanari Gentry-Bowers, 12, both shot by stray bullets in separate incidents on February 11, 2017.</p> <p>“What’s the effect on their peers as they move forward?” he asks. “Where does their hope for a better day come from?”</p> <p>“We want our trauma center to be a leader in thinking about violence,” says <strong>Kenneth S. Polonsky</strong>, dean of the Biological Sciences Division and the Pritzker School of Medicine and executive vice president for medical affairs for the University of Chicago. “How can you prevent it? How can you identify people who are at risk? How can you reduce the risk of recurrence in people who have already been involved? Dr. Rogers is extraordinarily well qualified for that.”</p> <p>Just as combating violence requires all hands on deck, Rogers says, the same is true for creating a world-class trauma hospital. From designing a system of comprehensive care to implementing quality improvements, hiring surgeons, and connecting to a regional trauma network, Rogers and UChicago physicians, nurses, and other clinicians have built a center that will deliver the highest level of care for life-threatening injuries.</p> <p>In December 2017 the medical center opened a new $39 million adult emergency department, the primary entry point for trauma patients, who are treated there and moved to other parts of the hospital once stabilized. Designed to dramatically improve speed and efficiency, the state-of-the-art facility has three rapid assessment bays for initial physician screenings; four specialized bays for stroke, heart, and trauma patients; and 24/7 emergency radiology services, a first for the hospital. Adult trauma also builds on UChicago Medicine’s existing level 1 pediatric trauma program and its Burn and Complex Wound Center.</p> <p>“The opening of the trauma center reflects what can be accomplished when the University, UChicago Medicine, and the community come together to work toward common goals,” says <strong>Derek Douglas</strong>, the University’s vice president for civic engagement and external affairs. “In that same spirit of partnership, the University is leveraging its strengths in education, research, innovation, and community engagement to identify ways to prevent violence.”</p> <p>“The trauma center isn’t a place, it’s a network,” says <strong>Kam Buckner</strong>, lecturer in public policy studies in the College, who cotaught a field research course on health care disparities in Chicago with Rogers last year. Among other campus partnerships, the trauma center is cosponsoring a yearlong lecture series through the MacLean Center for Clinical Medical Ethics.</p> <p>“We have the opportunity to do something transformative here on the South Side,” says Rogers, who aims to create models of violence prevention that can be replicated nationally. “I’m trying to challenge people to think differently. Certainly, UChicago Medicine and UChicago cannot do it by ourselves, but we have powerful voices.”</p></div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/science-medicine" hreflang="en">Science &amp; Medicine</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/trauma" hreflang="en">Trauma</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/health-care" hreflang="en">Health Care</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/public-health" hreflang="en">public health</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refuchicago field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/university-chicago-medicine" hreflang="en">The University of Chicago Medicine</a></div> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/science-medicine/taking-trauma" data-a2a-title="Taking on trauma"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Fscience-medicine%2Ftaking-trauma&amp;title=Taking%20on%20trauma"></a></span> Fri, 09 Nov 2018 18:43:58 +0000 admin 7010 at https://mag.uchicago.edu Community caregiver https://mag.uchicago.edu/science-medicine/community-caregiver <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/1705_Demanski_Community-caregiver.jpg" width="1600" height="743" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/jmiller" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">jmiller</span></span> <span>Tue, 05/09/2017 - 09:53</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>In his work directing the new level I adult trauma center, Rogers aims to address the underlying causes of medical inequity. (Photography by Nancy Wong)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/laura-demanski-am94"> <a href="/author/laura-demanski-am94"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Laura Demanski, AM’94</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/university-chicago-magazine" hreflang="en">The University of Chicago Magazine</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item">Spring/17</div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>The <em>Magazine</em> sits down with the leader of the University’s new level I adult trauma center.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Selwyn O. Rogers Jr. is a habitual storyteller, and a strong one. We spoke in his <a href="http://www.uchospitals.edu/index.shtml" target="_blank">University of Chicago Medicine</a> office this February, shortly after he arrived to <a href="https://news.uchicago.edu/article/2017/01/12/selwyn-rogers-head-uchicago-medicines-adult-trauma-center" target="_blank">direct the level 1 adult trauma center</a> that will open on campus next year—the only medical facility on Chicago’s South Side dedicated to treating life-threatening injuries from violence, car crashes, and other accidents.</p> <p>“Tell me if I tell too many stories,” he said partway through our conversation. But Rogers’s tales are arresting, and every one of them illuminates why he’s right here, right now.</p> <p>Like the story from when he was a junior faculty member at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. A man was brought in brain-dead from a gunshot wound to the head. With the patient’s mother and young daughter waiting outside the intensive care room, Rogers tried to quickly devise how he’d tell them there was nothing the doctors could do for the man.</p> <p>As he began by asking what their faith was, the man’s mother “looked at me very resolved,” he remembers, and calmly said that she wanted the girl to see her father. A young dad himself, with his own kids in mind, Rogers suggested that might not be a good idea. But the mother was insistent; the patient had just gotten out of prison and hadn’t yet seen his daughter. “I think it’s important,” she told Rogers.</p> <p>Rogers acceded, telling the little girl what to expect before bringing her into the room. There, in his re-creation of the scene, she “touches her dad’s hand, and the mother looks straight forward, keeps her hand on the girl’s shoulder, and there’s no crying, there’s no weeping, there’s just calm.” Afterward Rogers asked the mother, “What’s your source of strength?” She turned to him and said, “I had to bury my other son with a gunshot wound to the head two years ago.”</p> <p>He leans forward to finish the story, voice lowered. “And I thought, no mother should have to go through that once. ... No mother should <em>ever</em> have to go through that twice.’”</p> <p>It was early in his career, then, that Rogers started thinking hard about the social determinants of health—not only the violence that disproportionately affects some communities, but the disparities in income, education, and health care access that heighten the negative impact of diseases such as diabetes and asthma in those neighborhoods. He brings a holistic view of community health to his new job, and a determination to confront medical problems at their root.</p> <p>The day we met was just 48 days—Rogers keeps a running count in his head—since his move from the University of Texas Medical Branch, where he was vice president and chief medical officer, and  a little more than a year before UChicago’s adult trauma center is slated to open next spring. He’d had to roll up his sleeves (and order cold-weather clothes and boots) as soon as he arrived. His office was understandably a work in progress, with a few items standing out: photos of his fiancée and three sons, who live in Galveston, Texas, and Atlanta, respectively, and a stack of copies of <em><a href="https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/25663734-the-south-side" target="_blank">The South Side: A Portrait of Chicago and American Segregation</a></em> (St. Martin’s, 2016). He’d been reading up on the neighborhood he’ll be serving, and giving the book to colleagues.</p> <p>For Rogers, understanding the trauma center’s South Side setting is crucial. He believes he can’t succeed without the community’s help and trust. In addition to serving as the center’s founding director and as chief of the newly created Section for Trauma and Acute Care Surgery, he has a third appointment as executive vice president for community health engagement. In that capacity, he oversees UChicago Medicine’s <a href="http://www.uchospitals.edu/about/community/uhi/index.html" target="_blank">Urban Health Initiative</a>, which since 2006 has supported primary care clinics and education programs to improve the well-being of South Side neighborhoods. Linking that work with trauma care will distinguish this trauma center from most others.</p> <p>Rogers’s focus on community health and its social determinants will build on long experience. While an associate professor of surgery at Harvard University, Rogers founded its thriving Center for Surgery and Public Health, which researches how surgery can be most effective and equitable across populations. During a year working as a trauma surgeon at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and Meharry Medical College, he earned a master’s in public health at Vanderbilt. He has published frequently on health disparities and the impact of race and ethnicity on surgical outcomes.</p> <p>Rogers grew up in the US Virgin Islands, in a poor family on St. Croix. He’s still grateful that an elementary school teacher noticed his academic talent instead of writing him off as simply bored. Skipping a grade and starting junior high school early motivated him to throw himself into his studies. “The things that I liked the most were biological sciences,” he says, and he thought of becoming a science teacher. “That was the first step.”</p> <p>When it struck him that by being a doctor, he could both practice science and help people, Rogers pulled out a volume of his <em>Encyclopaedia Britannica</em> and looked up “medical school.” There were “only two medical schools listed, Harvard and Johns Hopkins. And that’s where I applied for college.” When his first year at Hopkins wasn’t the fit he was hoping for, he transferred to Harvard, where he finished college and medical school.</p> <p>At the top of Rogers’s to-do list now is hiring the team of surgeons who will provide care at UChicago Medicine as it adds four trauma bays and expands by 188 inpatient beds to accommodate, among other patient groups, an expected 2,000 trauma patients in the first year of providing adult trauma care. He’s eager to form partnerships with other hospitals in the city, with residents of the South Side, and with colleagues across UChicago.</p> <p>As much as he can weave a great story, Rogers prides himself on listening attentively and on being aware of what he doesn’t know. When we met, he had already kicked off his “active listening tour”—meeting and listening to stakeholders within the University and, “more fundamentally,” hearing from South Siders. “Without engagement of the communities,” he says, “we can build eight trauma centers, … and we will not have changed the core reasons for what we see every day.”</p> <p>Both the present moment and the University, he believes, provide an uncommon opportunity to make those changes. One thing that drew him to UChicago was his strong impression that it’s “a university that welcomes big, bold ideas.” And in its breadth of intellectual expertise he hopes to find the needed ingredients for such breakthroughs. He foresees working with faculty in economics, social service administration, public policy, and the <a href="https://urbanlabs.uchicago.edu" target="_blank">Urban Labs</a>’ <a href="https://urbanlabs.uchicago.edu/labs/crime" target="_blank">Crime Lab</a> and <a href="https://urbanlabs.uchicago.edu/labs/poverty" target="_blank">Poverty Lab</a>, to name a few. “I can’t think of a more compelling place or compelling set of circumstances for us to go for the big solution.”</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/science-medicine" hreflang="en">Science &amp; Medicine</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/health-care" hreflang="en">Health Care</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/trauma" hreflang="en">Trauma</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/medical-inequity" hreflang="en">Medical inequity</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/surgery" hreflang="en">Surgery</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refuchicago field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/university-chicago-medicine" hreflang="en">The University of Chicago Medicine</a></div> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/science-medicine/community-caregiver" data-a2a-title="Community caregiver"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Fscience-medicine%2Fcommunity-caregiver&amp;title=Community%20caregiver"></a></span> Tue, 09 May 2017 14:53:01 +0000 jmiller 6439 at https://mag.uchicago.edu Healing is prevention https://mag.uchicago.edu/law-policy-society/healing-prevention <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/1506_Rhee_Healing-is-prevention_portal.png" width="1200" height="743" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/jmiller" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">jmiller</span></span> <span>Wed, 05/06/2015 - 13:37</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>At Story Squad programs, students from the South Side share their experiences. (Photo courtesy Youth Safety and Violence Prevention program)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/nissa-rhee-ab06"> <a href="/author/nissa-rhee-ab06"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Nissa Rhee, AB’06</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/university-chicago-magazine" hreflang="en">The University of Chicago Magazine</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item">May–June/15</div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>An antiviolence program helps South Side youth navigate the trauma that surrounds them.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Local teens were just arriving at the <a href="http://www.ymcachicago.org/southchicago" target="_blank">South Chicago YMCA</a> for their weekly activities with the <a href="http://www.ymcachicago.org/programs/youth-safety-and-violence-prevention/" target="_blank">Youth Safety and Violence Prevention program</a> this past December when a man shot in the legs staggered into the building. None of the teens were involved in the drive-by shooting that injured the 23-year-old man, but the shock of witnessing such incidents can create cycles of violence.</p> <p>“There’s a saying that ‘hurt people, hurt people,’” explains <a href="http://www.urbaneconomy.org/ryanhollon" target="_blank">Ryan Lugalia-Hollon</a>, AB’04, a codirector of the YSVP program. “If you can help somebody process the trauma of violence, then you’ve changed their future.”</p> <p>Driven by the belief that “healing is prevention,” Lugalia-Hollon and codirector <a href="https://ssa.uchicago.edu/eddie-bocanegra-am-15" target="_blank">Eddie Bocanegra</a>, a master’s student in the <a href="https://www.ssa.uchicago.edu" target="_blank">School of Social Service Administration</a>, have helped transform the way the Chicago Y addresses youth violence. When they took the helm as the first permanent directors of the newly created YSVP program in 2013, they recruited kids from juvenile justice programs, housing projects, and schools on the South and West Sides, targeting kids on probation or involved in gangs. The students learn how to talk about their trauma through initiatives such as the <a href="https://soundcloud.com/ysvp/sets/story-squad-spring-2015" target="_blank">Story Squad</a> and to address conflict in peace and healing circles. They receive guidance from Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans in the Urban Warriors mentoring program.</p> <p>Over the past two years, Bocanegra and Lugalia-Hollon have doubled the YSVP staff. They’ve received support from sources like the <a href="http://www.macarthur.org" target="_blank">MacArthur Foundation</a> and Chicago’s <a href="http://www.cityofchicago.org/city/en/depts/fss.html" target="_blank">Department of Family and Support Services</a>, led by <a href="https://www.ssa.uchicago.edu/evelyn-diaz" target="_blank">Evelyn Diaz</a>, AM’98. Thanks to the increased funding, they’re now able to serve 359 teens in six neighborhoods across Chicago.</p> <p>Part of Bocanegra and Lugalia-Hollon’s progress with the program can be attributed to their own experiences with violence and poverty in Chicago. As a UChicago undergraduate, Lugalia-Hollon started a group connecting students to the Hyde Park and Woodlawn communities and served as the first social justice coordinator at the <a href="https://ucsc.uchicago.edu" target="_blank">University Community Service Center</a>. He received the University’s Perry Herst Prize honoring students who put their academic work to use in social service.</p> <p>After graduating, Lugalia-Hollon served as a fellow at the Adler School’s <a href="http://www.adler.edu/page/institutes/institute-on-public-safety-and-social-justice" target="_blank">Institute of Public Safety and Social Justice</a> before meeting Bocanegra in 2012. The men worked together to organize a conference about immigration and incarceration and grew to respect each other’s leadership styles and values. They also recognized that they had complementary skills, with Bocanegra specializing in program development and Lugalia-Hollon excelling at research and theoretical frameworks. So when the YMCA approached them later to lead their youth violence program, Bocanegra and Lugalia-Hollon knew that they wanted to work together.</p> <p>“We do this work because we believe there’s an untapped resource in underprivileged youth,” Bocanegra says. “The trajectory of these kids is being changed right in front of us. They’re now thinking about college, about MBAs, about becoming journalists.”</p> <p>Bocanegra experienced such a transformation himself as a young man growing up in Chicago’s Little Village neighborhood. He joined a gang at age 14. Four years later two of his friends were shot, one paralyzed. Bocanegra took to the streets for revenge and ended up killing another young man. After serving a 14-year prison sentence, he emerged with the mission of stopping youth violence. He became a “violence interrupter” for the organization <a href="http://cureviolence.org/partners/illinois-partners/" target="_blank">CeaseFire</a> and founded <a href="http://enlacechicago.org/programs-page/violence-prevention-2/grupo-consuelo/" target="_blank">Grupo Consuelo</a>, a therapeutic group for parents who have lost children to violence.</p> <p>After earning much recognition as a peace builder—he was featured in the 2011 documentary <em><a href="http://interrupters.kartemquin.com" target="_blank">The Interrupters</a></em> and former Illinois governor Pat Quinn <a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/after-committing-murder-teen-chicago-man-dedicates-his-lifes-work-his-victim" target="_blank">gave him a Hero Award</a>—Bocanegra received a Laurence Lynn Fellowship to study at the School of Social Service Administration with a focus on violence prevention. He says that his coursework at the SSA changed the way he looks at violence.</p> <p>“I now think about violence prevention from an ecological perspective,” he says. “I learned how early exposure to trauma really shapes the way an individual thinks and the different ways communities perceive violence.”</p> <p>Bocanegra has already been able to put his new knowledge into practice in his role as codirector of the YSVP program. When a 12-year-old boy in the program witnessed the shooting outside the South Chicago Y in December, Bocanegra was quick to intervene.</p> <p>He immediately reached out to the boy’s YSVP mentor, who talked to the boy’s family about the incident. Later, when they went on a field trip to the <a href="Pritzker%20Military%20Museum" target="_blank">Pritzker Military Museum</a> together, they discussed the shooting and posttraumatic stress disorder with the military veterans who volunteer with YSVP.</p> <p>“It was the second time the boy had seen someone get shot,” Bocanegra says. “I think it’s important for the kids to know it’s not normal to kill someone. But it is normal to have a sense of fear.”</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/law-policy-society" hreflang="en">Law, Policy &amp; Society</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/social-service" hreflang="en">Social Service</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/children" hreflang="en">Children</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/woodlawn" hreflang="en">Woodlawn</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/teens" hreflang="en">Teens</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/trauma" hreflang="en">Trauma</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/violence-prevention" hreflang="en">Violence Prevention</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refuchicago field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/school-social-service-administration" hreflang="en">School of Social Service Administration</a></div> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/law-policy-society/healing-prevention" data-a2a-title="Healing is prevention"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Flaw-policy-society%2Fhealing-prevention&amp;title=Healing%20is%20prevention"></a></span> Wed, 06 May 2015 18:37:59 +0000 jmiller 4649 at https://mag.uchicago.edu