Elizabeth Brandon https://mag.uchicago.edu/author/elizabeth-brandon en Novel pilgrim https://mag.uchicago.edu/arts-humanities/novel-pilgrim <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/1410_Brandon_Novel-pilgrim.png" width="700" height="325" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/rsmith" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">rsmith</span></span> <span>Wed, 08/27/2014 - 16:17</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>The medieval shrine of St. James in Santiago de Compostela has become the city’s massive cathedral. (<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/bibliosopher/2911326809/in/photolist-5rgj2P-5rkC9u-5rgh8K-5rgiqz-4pgpWG-6wQGSd-4pcoJ6-inF4wo-4pgeG1-4pg5j1-5rggMB-5rkBKu-4pciE8-inE7gc-4pgJM9-4pcFqt-6wG88T-6wLVBh-inEUQ7-6wQep5-6wQmM7-4pgwmj-4pc8wr-4pgvtj-4pcbh6-4pgmEb-6wKVb6-6wKK7t-6wR9cd-6wRbDf-4pg7w5-4pgms9-4pc7uk-6wLeHh-inDrBG-6wJnHF-inDy1d-avnijF-avnhH2-5DsfVW-avnjVi-avnmYr-avpM2S-avq1uG-4prFSX-avpYnm-avq5YN-avq5hq-5Fpzjn-6HLy8w" target="_blank">Photography</a> by bibliosopher, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/elizabeth-brandon"> <a href="/author/elizabeth-brandon"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Elizabeth Brandon</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/university-chicago-magazine" hreflang="en">The University of Chicago Magazine</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item"> Sept–Oct/14</div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>A Divinity School historian’s study of medieval Europe becomes a wellspring of historical fiction.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Traveling through northeastern Spain in 2003, Lucy Pick visited the church of Santa Maria in Santa Cruz de la Serós. An 11th-century Romanesque building, it stands along what was once a major pilgrimage route and originally served as a female monastery (a term that applied to both men and women) for daughters of the nobility. Pick, a medieval historian and Divinity School senior lecturer, explored the building’s mysteries, such as the big room above the altar whose purpose isn’t clear in historical records.</p> <p>Pick was also exploring something else: a book of historical fiction that had been simmering in her imagination for years and that would allow her to “fill in the gaps” that history left open.</p> <p>In July the novel, <em>Pilgrimage</em>, was released. Published by Cuidono Press, started by Martha K. Hoffman, AB’87, whose own PhD is in history, the novel takes readers on a journey with Gebirga, a blind woman, during the early 12th century. Gebirga travels from Flanders to the Spanish city of Santiago de Compostela, whose shrine—now a cathedral—was a major destination for pilgrims as the burial place of St. James the Apostle. The novel, Pick says, tries to “get into the skin of the an ordinary medieval person and to see their religious attitudes from the inside out.”</p> <p>Gebirga, Pick’s protagonist, synthesizes two historical clues. The first: a passage in the medieval manuscript <em>Codex Calixtinus</em>, containing a pilgrim’s guide to Santiago de Compostela, which traced the route from southern France to the holy city. The passage lists as one of book’s authors a Gebirga of Flanders.</p> <p>The second is the story of Saint Godeleva of Gistel, an 11th-century Flemish noblewoman. She was killed by her husband, and he was said to have had a blind daughter.</p> <p>In Pick’s novel, Gebirga loses her sight at about three years old; the last thing she remembers seeing is an argument between her parents, which ended in the death of her mother, Godeleva, who is later beatified. When the reader first meets Gebirga, more than two decades have passed. With her father away in the Crusades, Gebirga has taken to running the household, and everyone expects that she will join the convent founded in honor of her mother, and which houses her sainted bones.</p> <p>But through an accidental meeting with Katerinen, a count’s daughter, Gebirga instead embarks on a journey through France and into northern Spain. The women join a group of travelers heading toward Santiago de Compostela on the pilgrim road, including two clerics writing a guidebook and a mysterious messenger with an unknown agenda. Along the way Gebirga and Katerinen form a deep bond, and the pilgrims face danger, tragedy, and unexpected revelation.</p> <p>As an undergraduate at Queen’s University in Ontario, Canada, Pick studied how women represented themselves in medieval treatises; she received a PhD in medieval studies from the University of Toronto in 1995. Her scholarly book, <em>Conflict and Coexistence: Archbishop Rodrigo and the Muslims and Jews of Medieval Spain </em>(University of Michigan Press, 2004), explores the dynamic between Muslims, Jews, and Christians in medieval Toledo, Spain.</p> <p><em>Pilgrimage</em> began stirring in 1997 while Pick was finishing a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Chicago. The 2003 trip, which she took with her sister Elizabeth, a clinical therapist (“She is a person who listens to stories,” Pick says), helped propel the novel into being. Many of the medieval cities the sisters visited—Jaca, Loarre, and Santa Cruz de los Serós—appear in the book. The trip became, Pick says, “our own kind of pilgrimage.”</p> <p>In their travels, they were drawn to stories of women. One was Countess Sancha Ramirez, whose tomb in Jaca is decorated with a relief showing her flanked by her sisters, who were likely also nuns in the monastery at Santa Cruz, which the countess helped promote. “We usually think of medieval women in relationship to men,” Pick says, “and here we have these women in relationship with each other.”</p> <p>In <em>Pilgrimage</em>, Gebirga visits the church of Santa Cruz and traces her fingers across the relief on Countess Ramirez’s tomb (originally in Santa Cruz, it was later moved to Jaca, where Pick saw it), and she talks with the abbess about the possibility of Katerinen remaining there as a nun.</p> <p>The endpoint of Gebirga’s pilgrimage, Santiago de Compostela, is a place where Pick has not yet been. Someday, she says. Compostela represents a pilgrimage’s end, and Pick is still in the middle of hers. Having finished a second historical novel, she’s working on a third. “I think what I want to do is to keep on the journey and see where it takes me next.”</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/arts-humanities" hreflang="en">Arts &amp; Humanities</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/books" hreflang="en">Books</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/history" hreflang="en">History</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refuchicago field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/divinity-school" hreflang="en">Divinity School</a></div> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/arts-humanities/novel-pilgrim" data-a2a-title="Novel pilgrim"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Farts-humanities%2Fnovel-pilgrim&amp;title=Novel%20pilgrim"></a></span> Wed, 27 Aug 2014 21:17:06 +0000 rsmith 3884 at https://mag.uchicago.edu No truck with that https://mag.uchicago.edu/law-policy-society/no-truck <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/1112_Brandon_No-truck-with-that.jpg" width="1600" height="743" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Anonymous</span></span> <span>Mon, 10/31/2011 - 18:01</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>(Photo by Chris Strong)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/elizabeth-brandon"> <a href="/author/elizabeth-brandon"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Elizabeth Brandon</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/university-chicago-magazine" hreflang="en">The University of Chicago Magazine</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item">Nov–Dec/11</div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>A Law School clinic wants to remove the restrictions on Chicago’s mobile chefs.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Matt Maroni wanted to be the chef, and chauffeur, of his own food truck. In early 2010 he started researching the business and discovered several restrictions in Chicago law.</p> <p>For example, vendors who sell food from trucks and carts in the city must park at least 200 feet from restaurants and cannot serve food before 10 a.m. or after 10 p.m. In addition, the food must be prepackaged rather than cooked in the vehicles.</p> <p>Maroni pressed on, opening the food truck <a href="http://www.gaztro-wagon.com/Gaztro-Wagon/Home.html" target="_blank">Gaztro-Wagon</a> in 2010. He visits different locations around the city every day, which he announces via Twitter or text message, selling food prepared in an Edgewater storefront. Maroni also became an activist, establishing <a href="http://chicagofoodtrucks.com/Chicago_Food_Trucks/Home.html" target="_blank">chicagofoodtrucks.com</a> to push for fewer obstacles.</p> <p>He convinced his alderman to introduce an ordinance that Maroni wrote to allow on-site food preparation. “From the beginning it was just about me being able to get a food truck,” Maroni says, “and it just mushroomed into something bigger than I ever imagined.”</p> <p>In August the Law School’s <a href="http://www.ij.org/clinic" target="_blank">Institute for Justice Clinic on Entrepreneurship</a> joined Maroni’s cause, launching <a href="http://www.ij.org/about/3800" target="_blank">My Streets! My Eats!</a>, a campaign to ease the restrictions. Although the clinic backs the ordinance, under city-council committee review in October, it supports even farther-reaching proposals. “We’re hoping that it’s only one stepping stone in our progression toward the ultimate goal,” says clinic director Beth Milnikel, “which is making sure that Chicago is open for street food.”</p> <p>Chicago’s restrictions are not unusual—45 of the 50 largest cities in the United States, the clinic says on its website, “put real barriers in the way of street vendors.” Regulations include “no-vending zones” in 33 cities that prohibit sales in downtown areas or around stadiums. Twenty cities prevent mobile sales near restaurants with similar offerings and 19 limit how long a food truck can stay in one place.</p> <p>At the same time, as the <em>Economist</em> noted last year, mobile vending has become a bigger and better business. “Portland, Austin, San Francisco, and New York have thriving Twitter-driven food-truck scenes,” the magazine reported. Proponents of establishing a similar scene in Chicago see it as a matter of entrepreneurial freedom. Opponents raise public-health concerns over food-preparation conditions, sanitation issues from the trash the sellers and customers generate, and the economic threat to brick-and-mortar restaurants.</p> <p>Maroni says the perception and reality of mobile eateries as “roach coaches” have changed, and the proposed ordinance includes food-safety requirements. The law would require mobile vendors to use a commissary to be licensed. Those commissaries would have their own licenses and be subject to inspection. Supplies from the commissaries could then be used in the trucks for on-site preparation.</p> <p>The existing laws have not deterred some Chicago chefs. Phillip Foss runs the <a href="http://www.meatyballsmobile.com/MB/Home.html" target="_blank">Meatyballs Mobile</a>, a “silly and cute name” for a truck with serious menu selections, including “beef short ribs mixed with blue cheese with Waldorf accompaniments, radicchio marmalade, celery, apple, candied walnuts,” he says in a My Streets! My Eats! <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fbrBtI2ken4" target="_blank">video</a>.</p> <p>Foss says that confusion about the law has led to run-ins with police. Tamale vendor Claudia Gonzalez has received several tickets, and her son, who helps her with the business, has been arrested.</p> <p>Street vendors, says the clinic’s Milnikel, shouldn’t be “terrified that they’ll be arrested for selling tamales to their neighbors.”</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/law-policy-society" hreflang="en">Law, Policy &amp; Society</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/city-chicago" hreflang="en">City of Chicago</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/food-trucks" hreflang="en">Food Trucks</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refuchicago field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/law-school" hreflang="en">Law School</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-relatedstories field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>"<a href="http://www.thefeast.com/chicago/restaurants/The-Current-State-of-Food-Trucks-in-Chicago.html" target="_blank">Six Facts about Chicago Food Trucks</a>" (NBC Chicago, <em>The Feast</em> blog, August 10, 2011) "<a href="http://www.chicagomag.com/Chicago-Magazine/January-2011/Seven-Chicago-Food-Trucks-Where-They-Go-and-What-They-Serve/" target="_blank">Seven Chicago Food Trucks: Where They Go and What They Serve</a>" (<em>Chicago Magazine</em>, January 2011) "<a href="http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704008704575638842201629742.html" target="_blank">Moving Violations: In Chicago, Cooking and Driving Don't Mix</a>" (<em>Wall Street Journal</em>, December 13, 2010) "<a href="http://leisureblogs.chicagotribune.com/thestew/2010/07/chicagos-foodtruck-ordinance-introduced-.html" target="_blank">Chicago's Food-truck Ordinance Introduced</a>" (<em>Chicago Tribune</em>, <em>The Stew</em> blog, July 28, 2010)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-storymedia field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><h2 class="media-icon media-icon-video">Video</h2> <iframe width="200" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/fbrBtI2ken4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><p>The Law School’s Institute for Justice Clinic on Entrepreneurship talk about food trucks in Chicago and their My Streets! My Eats! campaign.</p> <p> <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fbrBtI2ken4" class="more-link">WATCH VIDEO AT YOUTUBE</a> </p> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/law-policy-society/no-truck" data-a2a-title="No truck with that"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Flaw-policy-society%2Fno-truck&amp;title=No%20truck%20with%20that"></a></span> Mon, 31 Oct 2011 23:01:23 +0000 Anonymous 419 at https://mag.uchicago.edu