List https://mag.uchicago.edu/formats/list en How to run for office https://mag.uchicago.edu/law-policy-society/how-run-office <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/1708_Chung_How-to-run-office.jpg" width="725" height="396" alt="Christian Mitchell" title="Christian Mitchell" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/jmiller" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">jmiller</span></span> <span>Tue, 08/15/2017 - 11:11</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>(Photo courtesy Christian Mitchell)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/jeanie-chung"> <a href="/author/jeanie-chung"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Jeanie Chung</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/core" hreflang="en">The Core</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item">Summer/17</div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Feeling inspired to try to change the world? Illinois state representative Christian Mitchell, AB’08, has some advice.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><strong>Christian Mitchell</strong> grew up in Chicago’s western suburbs of Maywood and Westchester. He came to UChicago intending to major in economics, get a JD/MBA, and become a sports attorney.</p> <p>Instead, a conversation with his resident head at Alper House during his first year convinced him to major in public policy studies and get involved in Democratic politics. Now he represents Illinois’s 26th District, which stretches from South Chicago to Streeterville and the Near North Side.</p> <hr /><h3><br /> Ask yourself why.</h3> <p>“Don’t run just to run. Run because you see something that needs to be different,” Mitchell says. “If you’ve got a fantastic state elected official or fantastic alderman, why are you going to run against them?”</p> <h3>Ask yourself why again.</h3> <p>Anybody can say they want to help people or make a difference. “What is the thing that keeps you up at night? What is your story?”</p> <h3>Work on somebody else’s campaign, preferably a local one.</h3> <p>You’ll learn a lot about campaigning and possibly make a future ally.</p> <h3>Check your expectations—and your ego.</h3> <p>“There’s a common saying in Chicago: ‘We don’t want nobody who nobody sent.’* That’s not actually true. ‘We don’t want nobody who nobody sent who thinks they’re somebody’ would be more accurate,” he says. “You have to be willing to do any dirty little job on the campaign—stuffing envelopes, refilling the bottles to wet the back of the envelopes, getting coffee.”</p> <h3>Talk to people who have done it before.</h3> <p>“See if you can get folks to support you. For example, if the state rep is retiring, will that rep support you?”</p> <h3>Raise money.</h3> <p>You can and should hit up friends, relatives, and coworkers, but you’ll also need institutional support. “Are you running as a Republican? What work have you done with the local business community or the manufacturing association or other local business interests? If you’re a Democrat, who do you know in the environmental community? Who do you know who is interested in campaign finance reform? Do you have relationships with labor unions, if that’s the sort of Democrat that you are?”</p> <h3>Commission a poll.</h3> <p>“If those numbers come back and say it’s an uphill climb,” Mitchell says, “you’ve got to decide, ‘Do I want to make this run to get my name out there? Or do I want to wait for a chance that I can win?’”</p> <h3>Get your signatures.</h3> <p>All candidates must file a nominating petition with legal, verifiable signatures of voters who live in their district. The number of signatures needed varies by office and state. Mitchell needed a minimum of 500.</p> <h3>Hire staff.</h3> <p>Mitchell recommends starting with a campaign manager, who will hire everyone else.</p> <h3>Understand that even if you’ve run campaigns, it’s not the same when you’re the candidate.</h3> <p>“It is different when your name is on the door. That is your name, that is your brand, that is your family. That is yourself. That is everything. It is a deeply humbling experience. And it is a siege. It is a pride-swallowing siege.”</p> <h3>Wait.</h3> <p>“The candidate is the most useless human being in the entire campaign on Election Day.”</p> <p><em>* According to legend, a ward committeeman said this to a young Abner Mikva, JD’51, when he tried to sign up as a campaign volunteer. Mikva went on to serve in the Illinois House and the US Congress and became a federal judge and White House adviser.</em></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/law-policy-society" hreflang="en">Law, Policy &amp; Society</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/politics" hreflang="en">Politics</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refuchicago field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/college-alumni" hreflang="en">College alumni</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refformats field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/formats/list" hreflang="en">List</a></div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/law-policy-society/how-run-office" data-a2a-title="How to run for office"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Flaw-policy-society%2Fhow-run-office&amp;title=How%20to%20run%20for%20office"></a></span> Tue, 15 Aug 2017 16:11:26 +0000 jmiller 6648 at https://mag.uchicago.edu Recommended reading https://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/recommended-reading <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/1708_Manhardt_Recommended-reading.jpg" width="725" height="504" alt="Recommended reading" title="Recommended reading" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/jmiller" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">jmiller</span></span> <span>Tue, 08/08/2017 - 13:56</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>(Photography by Michael Vendiola)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/sarah-manhardt-ab17"> <a href="/author/sarah-manhardt-ab17"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Sarah Manhardt, AB’17</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/core" hreflang="en">The Core</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item">Summer/17</div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>For your summer reading list, professors share the books that influenced them the most.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><h3>Matthew Briones</h3> <h4><strong>Associate professor, history</strong></h4> <p>Zora Neale Hurston’s <em>Their Eyes Were Watching God</em> (1937). I read it for historian James Goodman’s 20th Century Race Relations in the United States. He had inserted the Hurston novel into his history course as a lens into the “muck of the Everglades,” showing us the remarkable, historically factual burdens faced by African American women in the postbellum South. I had never read anything like it before—the use of dialect, the proto­feminist arc, and the close near-ethnographic attention to African American culture. So fiction drew me to history.</p> <h3>Daniel Holz</h3> <h4><strong>Associate professor, physics and astronomy &amp; astrophysics</strong></h4> <p><em>Nightfall </em>(1941), by Isaac Asimov. I first read this very short story when I was about 10. It touches on science, sociology, history, religion, and the fate of humankind. It asks what it might be like to have night arrive only once every 2,000 years. Imagine seeing the stars for the very first time and realizing that our solar system might be just one of countless others. The story emphasizes the fragility of civilization and brings home just how profound it can be to look up into the night sky. That feeling of awe has never left me.</p> <h3>William Howell</h3> <h4><strong>Sydney Stein Professor in American Politics</strong></h4> <p>I most enjoy books that grapple with big ideas through careful empirical research. And of late, I’ve found few works more arresting than those written by James Scott. In his 1999 tome, <em>Seeing Like a State</em>, Scott investigates the kinds of information that a state requires and the regimented ways in which it puts this information to use. The book is just brimming with ideas and insights. Two years after having read it, I’m still wrestling with what it says about the politics of surveillance and the pathologies of central planning.</p> <h3>Dennis J. Hutchinson</h3> <h4><strong>Senior lecturer in law and William Rainey Harper Professor in the College</strong></h4> <p>Only 32 pages long, <em>Audubon: A Vision</em> (1969) is the book I return to more than any other. Written by Robert Penn Warren at the height of his powers, the poem is at once lyrical, allegorical, and brutally vivid. The suite of seven sections is nominally the biography of the great naturalist John James Audubon and his explorations in the wilderness where he discovers “How thin is the membrane between himself and the world.” Idealism fades into acceptance of fate, satisfying a deep but unclassifiable longing. The poem ends with a childlike wish that echoes the journey: “In this century, and moment, of mania / Tell me a story. / Make it a story of great distances and starlight. / The name of the story will be Time, But you must not pronounce its name. / Tell me a story of deep delight.”</p> <h3>Peggy Mason</h3> <h4><strong>Professor, neurobiology</strong></h4> <p><em>Bel Canto</em> (2001) by Ann Patchett. This story oozes pathos as a group of people are held hostage. Yet it is dignity and generosity of spirit that emerge as the dominant themes. Rather than crying and wringing their hands, the characters make controlled and deliberate choices that move the reader in the same way as do Rodin’s <em>Burghers of Calais</em>. My feeling of admiration for the characters’ principled actions under extraordinary circumstances is as fresh as it was on the day I finished the book.</p> <h3>Borja Sotomayor</h3> <h4><strong>Senior lecturer, computer science</strong></h4> <p>As far as I can remember, I have always liked computers. Growing up in the ’80s and ’90s without internet access, I had to get by with the few books I could get my hands on in Spain, and had no way to connect with a like-minded community. Going to college didn’t actually help much at first, as I found that most of my classmates were driven not so much by a passion for computing but by the promise of a lucrative career in the tech industry.</p> <p>During my sophomore year I read Steven Levy’s <em>Hackers: Heroes of the Computer Revolution</em> (1984). I was blown away. Levy’s book presented not just the rich history of hacker culture, which gave rise to some of the greatest advances in computing, but also the hacker ethic, a set of values that I had been adhering to already: finding joy in learning, blurring the lines between work and play, and sharing knowledge responsibly and freely. <em>Hackers</em> had a profound impact because it gave me the identity I had been seeking for so long.</p> <h3>Paul Staniland</h3> <h4><strong>Associate professor, political science</strong></h4> <p>Samuel Huntington’s 1968 work, <em>Political Order in Changing Societies</em>. It’s turned out that many of its claims were wrong, and others too vague to be right or wrong. But it brought together in one place the study of political order, revolution, insurgency, counterrevolution, state building, military coups, the politics of the postcolonial world, foreign military interventions, and many other topics that often are studied separately. I remember reading it early in graduate school and thinking, “This—all of it—is exactly what I want to study.” It also insisted that social science is relevant to, and important in, policy debates, even if in controversial or problematic ways. I can still flip through it and find interesting, provocative (sometimes contradictory) ideas popping off the page.</p> <h3>Sara Ray Stoelinga, AB’95, AM’01, PhD’04</h3> <h4><strong>Sara Liston Spurlark Director, Urban Education Institute</strong></h4> <p>One of the books that has had a significant influence on my thinking is <em>So Much Reform, So Little Change </em>(2008) by Charles Payne [Frank P. Hixon Distinguished Service Professor, School of Social Service Administration]. Payne examines urban schools and public school systems and identifies the reasons why school reform initiatives have been unsuccessful. His analysis describes the social, cultural, historical, and structural aspects of urban public schools and the ways reform efforts do not understand, take into account, or work within these realities. Payne provides a clear-eyed depiction of the complex challenges that face urban schools coupled with a sense of hope that recent school reform efforts have identified pathways to improvement.</p> <hr /><p>A version of this article <a href="http://college.uchicago.edu/uniquely-chicago/story/professors-bookshelf-0">originally appeared</a> on the College’s website. See more Uniquely Chicago articles, photos, and videos by student contributors at <a href="http://college.uchicago.edu/archives">college.uchicago.edu/archives</a>.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/university-news" hreflang="en">University News</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/reading" hreflang="en">Reading</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refformats field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/formats/list" hreflang="en">List</a></div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/recommended-reading" data-a2a-title="Recommended reading"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Funiversity-news%2Frecommended-reading&amp;title=Recommended%20reading"></a></span> Tue, 08 Aug 2017 18:56:51 +0000 jmiller 6653 at https://mag.uchicago.edu Clichés I have known and loved https://mag.uchicago.edu/arts-humanities/cliches-i-have-known-and-loved <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/1708_Golus_Cliches-I-have-known-loved.jpg" width="725" height="396" alt="Clichés, illustrated" title="Clichés, illustrated" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/jmiller" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">jmiller</span></span> <span>Tue, 08/08/2017 - 10:38</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>(Illustration by Zachary Anderson)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/carrie-golus-ab91-am93"> <a href="/author/carrie-golus-ab91-am93"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Carrie Golus, AB’91, AM’93</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/core" hreflang="en">The Core</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item">Summer/17</div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>A lexicographer’s favorite clichés (before he grew to hate them). </p> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Many clichés are “really very clever and original,” writes lexicographer <strong>Orin Hargraves</strong>, AB’77, in <em>It’s Been Said Before: A Guide to the Use and Abuse of Clichés</em> (Oxford University Press, 2014). It’s only through overuse that they become so annoying.</p> <p>Asked for a list of his ex-favorites—clichés he liked at first but that now grate—Hargraves supplied these.</p> <hr /><h3>Back-of-the-envelope calculation</h3> <p>The image conveyed in this one is vivid and realistic—but now a bit tired, having been around for more than half a century. It’s hard to argue that you need six syllables when one—like you find in the word “quick”—will do.</p> <h3>Change the calculus</h3> <p>This cliché seems to have crept into use from military slang. Calculus is a great conjuring word because most people never studied it—particularly the people who use this cliché.</p> <h3>The elephant in the room</h3> <p>Huge credit to whoever coined this cliché because of the aptness of its image. Today, however, it is so frequently used it can’t really be made fresh. Except by perhaps putting an actual elephant in a room.</p> <h3>A seismic shift</h3> <p>Seismic is a relatively new word in English, only mid-19th century, and it has plenty of literal work to do in relation to earthquakes and tectonic plates, without being called out for overtime in this tired cliché. If you want to make it even worse you can say, “a seismic shift in the political landscape.”</p> <h3>Rise phoenix-like from the ashes</h3> <p>I have to include this one for the sake of the University’s emblem, and I don’t really mind it so much if the user omits “phoenix-like,” because we already know that. What else would rise from ashes?</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/arts-humanities" hreflang="en">Arts &amp; Humanities</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/language" hreflang="en">Language</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/writing" hreflang="en">Writing</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refuchicago field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/college-alumni" hreflang="en">College alumni</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refformats field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/formats/list" hreflang="en">List</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-relatedstories field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>“<a href="../arts-humanities/lexicographer">Lexicographer</a>” (<em>University of Chicago Magazine</em>, Summer/17)</p> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/arts-humanities/cliches-i-have-known-and-loved" data-a2a-title="Clichés I have known and loved"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Farts-humanities%2Fcliches-i-have-known-and-loved&amp;title=Clich%C3%A9s%20I%20have%20known%20and%20loved"></a></span> Tue, 08 Aug 2017 15:38:17 +0000 jmiller 6640 at https://mag.uchicago.edu Six UChicago podcasts to try this summer https://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/six-uchicago-podcasts-try-summer <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/1707_Akin_Six-UChicago-podcasts-try-summer.jpg" width="1600" height="743" alt="Akin_Six-UChicago-podcasts-try-summer" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/jmiller" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">jmiller</span></span> <span>Tue, 07/18/2017 - 11:47</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>UChicago’s podcasts are fit for even William Rainey Harper’s distinguished ears. (Photo collage by Kaitlyn Akin; archival source photo courtesy University of Chicago Photographic Archive, <a href="http://photoarchive.lib.uchicago.edu/db.xqy?keywords=apf1-02520" target="_blank">apf1-02520</a>, Special Collections Research Center, University of Chicago Library)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/kaitlyn-akin-19"> <a href="/author/kaitlyn-akin-19"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Kaitlyn Akin, ’19</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/web-exclusives" hreflang="en">Web exclusives</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item">07.18.2017</div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Forget beach reading. This summer, try beach listening. </p> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>In the throes of a long, hot summer break, students and alumni alike find themselves searching for something intellectually engaging to wake warmth-lulled brain cells. <em>If only I were in class right now</em>, they think, craving the wintery chaos of the academic year. <em>I wish I could hear the melodious sounds of a lecturer, rather than these calming ocean waves!</em> Luckily for such studious individuals, the University of Chicago has plenty of active podcasts that give the listener anytime-access lectures, debates, and discussions. Whether you’re truly on the beach or just trying to make it through a long day at the office, there’s something for you:</p> <p><img alt="" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/hr.png" /></p> <h2><a href="http://politics.uchicago.edu/pages/axefiles">The Axe Files</a></h2> <p><strong>David Axelrod</strong>, AB’76, director of the Institute of Politics, hosts this twice-weekly political discussion with politicians, journalists, and activists. Axelrod routinely draws some of the biggest names on the political scene today, including top congresspeople from both sides of the aisle.</p> <p><em>The Axe Files</em> is by far the most well-known University podcast: it’s ranked #35 in the News &amp; Politics section on iTunes, and quotes by the guests are frequently used by <a href="http://thehill.com/homenews/campaign/340632-booker-i-dont-know-if-ill-run-in-2020">other news outlets</a>—for instance, when New Jersey senator Cory Booker told Axelrod that he was considering running for president in 2020.</p> <p>Conversations often veer into the autobiographical. In an episode from June, Massachsetts senator Elizabeth Warren discussed how her father’s heart attack derailed her family’s well-being due to a lack of health insurance, and how this hardship shaped her views on the importance of accessible and affordable care.</p> <h2><a href="https://harris.uchicago.edu/news-events/podcasts">Radio Harris</a></h2> <p>Faculty and students from the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy discuss current events through the lens of their research. Topics range from the wage gap to homicide statistics to parenting.</p> <p>This podcast is not to be confused with the other <em>Radio Harris</em>, which showcases music from students attending Toronto’s Harris Institute for the Arts. That one is good too, though!</p> <h2><a href="https://www.chicagobooth.edu/about/newsroom/podcast">Chicago Booth Podcast Series</a></h2> <p>The University of Chicago Booth School of Business faculty sit down with successful alumni to discuss their career paths and research projects. Guests include CEOs of some of the biggest companies in America, prominent economic researchers, and the school’s namesake, <strong>David G. Booth</strong>, MBA’71.</p> <p>In the latest episode, the founder of Shake Shack discusses his experience in the hospitality field and his method for investment: appropriately, to follow his gut.</p> <h2><a href="https://player.fm/series/chicago-booth-careercast">Chicago Booth CareerCast</a></h2> <p>Hosted by <strong>Anita Brick</strong>, AB’77, MBA’81, director of MBA Career Advancement Programs at Chicago Booth, this podcast asks successful businesspeople to give advice to help Booth students succeed professionally.</p> <p>Guests are usually authors of their own career advice books and cover everything from the basics of professionalism (“commit to be on LinkedIn,” David Mattson, CEO and president of Sadler Training) to the nuances of changing careers (“A year from now, what do you want to be learning?” Jenny Blake, author of <em>PIVOT: The Only Move That Matters Is Your Next One</em>, 2016).</p> <h2><a href="https://lucian.uchicago.edu/blogs/elucidations">Elucidations</a></h2> <p>This monthly podcast from UChicago’s philosophy department tackles the big questions (Is democracy a legitimate form of government?) and the smaller ones (How do fictional names contribute to the suspension of disbelief in fiction?).</p> <p>Each episode features a different expert discussing his or her research with philosophy lecturer <strong>Matt Teichman</strong>, AM’09, PhD’15.</p> <h2><a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu/audio/podcasts/faculty">Law School Faculty Podcast</a></h2> <p>Faculty members from the University of Chicago Law School participate in monthly lectures and debates over current legal issues. Episodes are mostly recordings of events hosted on campus, complete with student questions at the end.</p> <p>Speakers have included <strong>Martha Nussbaum</strong>, the Ernst Freund Distinguished Service Professor of Law and Ethics; <strong>Richard Epstein</strong>, the James Parker Hall Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus of Law; and former FBI director <strong>James Comey</strong>, JD’85. All the fun of being in law school, without taking exams or paying tuition.</p></div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/university-news" hreflang="en">University News</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/podcasts" hreflang="en">Podcasts</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refformats field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/formats/list" hreflang="en">List</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-relatedstories field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>“<a href="http://mag.uchicago.edu/law-policy-society/listen" target="_self">Listen Up</a>” (<em>University of Chicago Magazine</em>, July-Aug/15)</p> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/six-uchicago-podcasts-try-summer" data-a2a-title="Six UChicago podcasts to try this summer"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Funiversity-news%2Fsix-uchicago-podcasts-try-summer&amp;title=Six%20UChicago%20podcasts%20to%20try%20this%20summer"></a></span> Tue, 18 Jul 2017 16:47:39 +0000 jmiller 6587 at https://mag.uchicago.edu What do we want to know this year? https://mag.uchicago.edu/arts-humanities/what-do-we-want-know-year <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/1705_Golus_Fundamentals.jpg" width="1600" height="743" alt="Golus_Fundamentals" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/jmiller" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">jmiller</span></span> <span>Thu, 06/08/2017 - 11:57</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>(Collage by Joy Olivia Miller, <a href="https://archive.org/details/utriusquecosmima02flud" target="_blank">source illustration</a> by Robert Fludd, 1617, public domain)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/carrie-golus-ab91-am93"> <a href="/author/carrie-golus-ab91-am93"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Carrie Golus, AB’91, AM’93</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/web-exclusives" hreflang="en">Web exclusives</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item">06.08.2017</div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Fundamentals students ask fundamental questions. </p> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Socrates had questions: What is virtue? What is the good? What is justice? </p> <p>Freud had questions: What is happiness? Can humans be happy?</p> <p>And so do the undergraduates majoring in fundamentals: issues and texts. As the program’s website states, “Genuine questions cannot be assigned to a student; they must arise from within.” Each fundamentals student chooses a question, then designs a reading list to try to answer it over the next three years.</p> <p>Here’s a sampling of what current fundamentals students are trying to figure out. </p> <p align="center"><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/hr.png" /></p> <h2>Why do bad things happen to good people?</h2> <h5><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/1705_Golus_Fundamentals_spotA.jpg" width="500"><br>(<a href="http://hdl.handle.net/10934/RM0001.COLLECT.541335" target="_blank">Source illustration</a> by Burger, published by De Ruyter &amp; Meijer in 1881, public domain)</h5> <p align="center"><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/hr.png" /></p> <h2>Why do we read tragedy?</h2> <h5><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/1705_Golus_Fundamentals_spotB.jpg" width="500"><br>(<a href="http://hdl.handle.net/10934/RM0001.COLLECT.12073" target="_blank">Source painting</a> by Cornelis Kruseman, public domain)</h5> <p align="center"><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/hr.png" /></p> <h2>What does it mean to be normal?</h2> <h5><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/1705_Golus_Fundamentals_spotC.jpg" width="500"><br>(<a href="http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/56345a50-c6b6-012f-4334-58d385a7bc34" target="_blank">Source illustration</a> courtesy the New York Public Library Digital Collections, public domain)</h5> <p align="center"><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/hr.png" /></p> <h2>How do we define success?</h2> <h5><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/1705_Golus_Fundamentals_spotD.jpg" width="500"><br>(<a href="http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/241168" target="_blank">Source sculpture</a> courtesy the Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Cesnola Collection, public domain)</h5> <p align="center"><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/hr.png" /></p> <h2>What is beauty?</h2> <h5><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/1705_Golus_Fundamentals_spotE.jpg" width="500"><br>(<a href="http://hdl.handle.net/10934/RM0001.COLLECT.541335" target="_blank">Source illustration</a> by Félix Bracquemond, published by Auguste Delâtre in 1865, public domain)</h5> <p align="center"><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/hr.png" /></p> <h2>What follows postmodernity?</h2> <h5><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/1705_Golus_Fundamentals_spotF.jpg" width="500"><br>(<a href="http://www.europeana.eu/portal/en/record/92062/BibliographicResource_1000126033053.html" target="_blank">Source etching</a> courtesy the Österreichische Nationalbibliothek, Austrian National Library, public domain)</h5> <p align="center"><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/hr.png" /></p> <h2>What’s surprising?</h2> <h5><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/1705_Golus_Fundamentals_spotG.jpg" width="500"><br>(<a href="http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/205833" target="_blank">Source sculpture</a> courtesy the Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Lesley and Emma Sheafer Collection, public domain)</h5> <p align="center"><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/hr.png" /></p> <h2>Why do some people “give up” and others “keep going”?</h2> <h5><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/1705_Golus_Fundamentals_spotH.jpg" width="500"><br>(<a href="https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/7edbe820-c606-012f-0bcd-58d385a7bc34#/?uuid=510d47d9-703d-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99" target="_blank">Source artwork</a> by John Gould, courtesy the New York Public Library, Rare Book Division, public domain)</h5> <p align="center"><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/hr.png" /></p> <h2>Why do we laugh?</h2> <h5><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/1705_Golus_Fundamentals_spotI.jpg" width="500"><br>(<a href="http://hdl.handle.net/10934/RM0001.COLLECT.4058" target="_blank">Source sculpture</a> courtesy the Rijksmuseum, public domain)</h5> <p align="center"><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/hr.png" /></p> <h2>What is power?</h2> <h5><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/1705_Golus_Fundamentals_spotJ.jpg" width="500"><br>(<a href="http://hdl.handle.net/10934/RM0001.COLLECT.4058" target="_blank">Source painting</a> by Benjamin West, courtesy the Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Maria DeWitt Jesup Fund, public domain)</h5> <p align="center"><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/hr.png" /></p> <h2>Should I be selfish?</h2> <h5><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/1705_Golus_Fundamentals_spotK.jpg" width="500"><br>(<a href="http://hdl.handle.net/10934/RM0001.COLLECT.150811" target="_blank">Source engraving</a> by Jacob Matham Avarice, courtesy the Rijksmuseum, public domain)</h5> <p align="center"><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/hr.png" /></p> <h2>What is opinion?</h2> <h5><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/1705_Golus_Fundamentals_spotL.jpg" width="500"><br>(<a href="http://hdl.handle.net/10934/RM0001.COLLECT.41431" target="_blank">Source print</a> by Louis Marin Bonnet, published by François Vivares, courtesy the Rijksmuseum, public domain)</h5> <p align="center"><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/hr.png" /></p> <h2>What is great learning?</h2> <h5><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/1705_Golus_Fundamentals_spotM.jpg" width="500"><br>(<a href="https://archive.org/details/utriusquecosmima02flud" target="_blank">Source illustration</a> by Robert Fludd, 1617, public domain)</h5> <p align="center"><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/hr.png" /></p> <h2>What is the relationship between guilt and pleasure?</h2> <h5><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/1705_Golus_Fundamentals_spotN.jpg" width="500"><br>(<a href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Le_secret.jpg" target="_blank">Source illustration</a> from l'illustration Européenne, 1871, public domain)</h5> <p align="center"><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/hr.png" /></p> <h2>Why are we afraid of aliens?</h2> <h5><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/1705_Golus_Fundamentals_spotO.jpg" width="500"><br>(<a href="http://hdl.handle.net/10934/RM0001.COLLECT.145271" target="_blank">Source etching</a> by Jan Luyken, public domain)</h5> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/arts-humanities" hreflang="en">Arts &amp; Humanities</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/fundamentals" hreflang="en">Fundamentals</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refuchicago field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/college-students" hreflang="en">College students</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/college" hreflang="en">The College</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refformats field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/formats/list" hreflang="en">List</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-relatedstories field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>“<a href="http://thecore.uchicago.edu/Summer2015/departments/top-13.shtml" target="_blank">Fundamentals Questions</a>” (<em>The Core</em>, Summer/15)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-relatedlinks field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p><strong>Learn</strong> more about <a href="https://fundamentals.uchicago.edu" target="_blank">fundamentals</a>.</p> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/arts-humanities/what-do-we-want-know-year" data-a2a-title="What do we want to know this year?"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Farts-humanities%2Fwhat-do-we-want-know-year&amp;title=What%20do%20we%20want%20to%20know%20this%20year%3F"></a></span> Thu, 08 Jun 2017 16:57:23 +0000 jmiller 6519 at https://mag.uchicago.edu Six things you never learned in French class https://mag.uchicago.edu/arts-humanities/six-things-you-never-learned-french-class <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/1705_Golus_Six-things-French-class.jpg" width="1600" height="743" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/jmiller" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">jmiller</span></span> <span>Tue, 05/23/2017 - 12:22</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Graffiti in Marseille. (<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/jmenj/11386583786" target="_blank">Photography</a> by Jeanne Menjoulet, (CC BY 2.0)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/carrie-golus-ab91-am93"> <a href="/author/carrie-golus-ab91-am93"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Carrie Golus, AB’91, AM’93</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/web-exclusives" hreflang="en">Web exclusives</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item"><p>05.23.2017</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item">Unless you took French at the University of Chicago.</div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>This spring quarter I found myself back in Cobb Hall, more than 25 years after I graduated, sitting in on French 101. Most of the students in the class hadn’t even been born then.</p> <p>It was humbling. For years I had struggled to learn French in adult education settings, where the pace is slow and no one studies between class meetings. (Tellingly, when I took UChicago’s placement exam, I tested into French 101.) Those adult classes were like a gentle jog around the block. French 101 was like training for a marathon—along with a team of professional athletes.</p> <p>I was brain tired in a way I had never been before. I craved sugar and had zero patience. The experience gave me new insight into the way my kids had acted out while adjusting to full-day kindergarten.</p> <p>Once my brain adapted to the strain, here are some things I learned.</p> <p align="center"><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/hr.png" /></p> <h2>Smash your words together.</h2> <p>When native speakers say<em> je suis</em> (I am), it comes out like “schwee.” <em>Il y a</em> (there is) is “ya.” You will be understood if you pronounce all those words separately. But if you want to understand French people, you need to learn what to listen for.</p> <h2>Use words that don’t actually mean anything.</h2> <p>You already do this in English. They’re known as filler words: well, um, OK. In French, the equivalents are <em>bon</em>, <em>ben</em>, <em>bon ben</em> (my personal favorite—like, well OK), <em>alors</em>, and<em> allez</em>. Also <em>hein</em>, used at the end of a sentence for confirmation, meaning something like <em>eh?</em> or <em>huh?</em></p> <h2>Don’t switch your word order to make questions.</h2> <p>None of this <em>Quelle heure est-il?</em> (What time is it?) or <em>Comment dit-on … ?</em> (How do you say…?) that you may have learned. <em>Mais, non</em>. Try <em>Quelle heure il est?</em> (What time it is?) or <em>Comment on dit … ?</em> (How one says … ?). Raise your intonation at the end, just as in English. <em>Voilà</em>, a question.</p> <h2>Some words require physical gestures as well.</h2> <p>The word <em>bof</em>, which means roughly <em>meh</em>, must be accompanied by a one-shoulder shrug, or it doesn’t make any sense. Not two shoulders, just one. The shoulder you choose is up to you.</p> <h2>The number of cheek kisses in France varies.</h2> <p>Everyone knows that French people kiss each other on the cheek—but it’s complicated. The number of kisses can vary from two (in Paris) to four (in the north). And some people begin on the right, some on the left, with all the awkwardness you would expect.</p> <h2>Know your pastries.</h2> <p>What’s sold in Hyde Park as a chocolate croissant is <em>un pain au chocolat</em> in France. Here’s another opportunity to smash your words together: <em>Je voudrais</em> (I would like) is two syllables: <em>jvou-drais</em>.</p> <p><em>Délicieux!</em></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/arts-humanities" hreflang="en">Arts &amp; Humanities</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/language" hreflang="en">Language</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refformats field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/formats/list" hreflang="en">List</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-relatedstories field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item">“<a href="http://mag.uchicago.edu/arts-humanities/lingua-franca" target="_self">Lingua Franca</a>” (<em>University of Chicago Magazine</em>, Spring/17) “<a href="http://thecore.uchicago.edu/Winter2015/features/americans-in-paris.shtml" target="_blank">Americans in Paris</a>” (<em>The Core</em>, Winter/15)</div> <div class="field field--name-field-relatedlinks field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p><strong>Learn</strong> about UChicago’s <a href="https://summerlanguages.uchicago.edu/" target="_blank">Summer Language Institute</a>.</p> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/arts-humanities/six-things-you-never-learned-french-class" data-a2a-title="Six things you never learned in French class"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Farts-humanities%2Fsix-things-you-never-learned-french-class&amp;title=Six%20things%20you%20never%20learned%20in%20French%20class"></a></span> Tue, 23 May 2017 17:22:55 +0000 jmiller 6478 at https://mag.uchicago.edu How to get your $$$ in order before you turn 30 https://mag.uchicago.edu/economics-business/how-get-your-order-you-turn-30 <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/1705_Golus_Index-card-redux.jpg" width="1600" height="743" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/jmiller" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">jmiller</span></span> <span>Tue, 05/16/2017 - 12:18</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>(Collage by Joy Olivia Miller)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/carrie-golus-ab91-am93"> <a href="/author/carrie-golus-ab91-am93"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Carrie Golus, AB’91, AM’93</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/core" hreflang="en">The Core</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item">Summer/17 (Published online: 05.16.2017)</div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Harold Pollock’s new index card is for young adults.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>All the personal finance advice you need would fit on a 3-by-5 card, Harold Pollack quipped in a 2013 interview. Immediately people wanted to know: Where’s the card? So Pollack, the Helen Ross Professor in the School of Social Service Administration, scribbled down some ideas and posted a photo, which went viral.</p> <p>For <em>College Review</em>, Pollack created this new, potentially viral index card specifically for recent graduates.</p> <div class="story-inline-img"> <figure role="group"><img alt="Index Card for recent grads" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="73f3c302-0be9-42cd-99b1-982c91934df8" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/1705_Golus_Index-card-redux_spotA.jpg" /><figcaption>Professor Harold Pollack’s handwritten index card for young adults. (Courtesy Harold Pollack)</figcaption></figure></div> <hr /><ul><li>Pay your credit card bill in full every month.</li> <li>Keep a budget and spending diary. Pay cash up front whenever you can.</li> <li>Don’t smoke. Mind your alcohol and dining spending, too.</li> <li>Start saving early. Make it automatic, ideally through a 401(k).</li> <li>If you have a job and no kids, aim to save 20% of pretax income.</li> <li>Invest in low-fee total stock index funds, ideally in a 401(k).</li> <li>Open a Roth IRA if you don’t have access to a 401(k).</li> <li>Don’t buy individual stocks or try to time the markets.</li> <li>Think federal first when borrowing for school. And don’t combine public and private loans if you consolidate.</li> <li>A focused and rigorous major matters more than where you go to college.</li> <li>Don’t push your friends to overspend. And beware the same peer pressures applied to you.</li> </ul></div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/economics-business" hreflang="en">Economics &amp; Business</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/finance" hreflang="en">Finance</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/financial-planning" hreflang="en">Financial Planning</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refuchicago field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/school-social-service-administration" hreflang="en">School of Social Service Administration</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refformats field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/formats/list" hreflang="en">List</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-relatedstories field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>“<a href="../economics-business/ask-me-anything-about-money">Ask Me Anything About Money</a>” (<em>University of Chicago Magazine</em>, web exclusives, Jan–Feb/14)</p> <p>“<a href="../economics-business/financial-brief">Financial Brief</a>” (<em>University of Chicago Magazine</em>, Jan–Feb/14)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-relatedlinks field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p><strong>Follow</strong> Harold Pollack (<a href="https://twitter.com/haroldpollack">@haroldpollack</a>) on Twitter.</p> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/economics-business/how-get-your-order-you-turn-30" data-a2a-title="How to get your $$$ in order before you turn 30"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Feconomics-business%2Fhow-get-your-order-you-turn-30&amp;title=How%20to%20get%20your%20%24%24%24%20in%20order%20before%20you%20turn%2030"></a></span> Tue, 16 May 2017 17:18:51 +0000 jmiller 6460 at https://mag.uchicago.edu Yes, you can find a job you don’t hate https://mag.uchicago.edu/economics-business/yes-you-can-find-job-you-dont-hate <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/1611_Hadavas_Yes-you-can-find-job-you-dont-hate_1.jpg" width="1600" height="743" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/jmiller" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">jmiller</span></span> <span>Wed, 11/02/2016 - 17:04</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>The fairy tale of finding your singular calling is enticing, says Elatia Abate, AB’99, MBA’08, but the reality is that the job search is about lifelong discovery. (Collage by Joy Olivia Miller)</p> <p>Below: Portrait of Abate. (Courtesy Elatia Abate)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/chloe-hadavas-ab17"> <a href="/author/chloe-hadavas-ab17"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Chloe Hadavas, AB’17</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/web-exclusives" hreflang="en">Web exclusives</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item"><p>10.31.2016</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>How to carve out your niche in the job market.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/1607_Golus_Job-search-change-since-2008_spotA.jpg" align="right" />The modern job market can leave workers dissatisfied. Despite the huge number of networking and career events intended to help job seekers, many people never find work they truly enjoy. Why? While the current system is good at filling open positions efficiently, explains career coach Elatia Abate, AB’99, MBA’08, “it doesn’t necessarily confer what we as human beings want to create.” Still, she argues, within this imperfect structure, we can carve out our own niche to reach career satisfaction. Here are three of Abate’s tips for constructing that path to fulfillment. <h2>Tip one</h2> <strong>Accept that there is no one perfect job.</strong> The myth of finding your singular calling is enticing, Abate says, but the reality is that the job search should be about lifelong discovery. “So stop worrying about getting the perfect job and really just focus on doing something that’s going to help you continue with the life of the mind and create a life that is interesting and engaging for you.” <h2>Tip two</h2> <strong>Learn from unfulfilling experiences.</strong> When you are not as enthusiastic about a job as you’d hoped, take a few steps back. Ask yourself, “Why is it that I want to leave? What is it that I want to create instead? What about this job is working for me?” “It’s never all bad,” insists Abate, “even in uncomfortable situations.” At the very least you’re learning something. Pay attention to what you like and—more importantly—dislike. If you decide to leave, make sure you have a direction going forward: “Don’t assume you’ll just figure it out later.” <h2>Tip three</h2> <strong>Don’t lose your sense of curiosity and agency.</strong> Recognize that you have the power to create a career of happiness. Don’t give up on being curious, excited, and engaged in the world as you navigate the job market. Invoking Joseph Campbell, Abate believes that people are not looking for the meaning of life but for the experience of being alive. “For me, this is what [finding a career] is really all about,” she says. “Why do we lose that sense of adventure and being alive when we simply don’t have to?”</div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/economics-business" hreflang="en">Economics &amp; Business</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/careers" hreflang="en">Careers</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/jobs" hreflang="en">Jobs</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refuchicago field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/career-advancement" hreflang="en">Career Advancement</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refformats field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/formats/list" hreflang="en">List</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-relatedstories field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>“<a href="http://mag.uchicago.edu/economics-business/networking-introverts" target="_self">Networking for Introverts</a>” (<em>University of Chicago Magazine</em>, web exclusives, 08.12.2016)</p> <p>“<a href="http://mag.uchicago.edu/economics-business/how-job-search-has-changed-2008" target="_self">How the Job Search Has Changed since 2008</a>” (<em>University of Chicago Magazine</em>, web exclusives, 07.20.2016)</p> <p>“<a href="http://thecore.uchicago.edu/Winter2016/features/insider-information.shtml" target="_blank">Insider Information: So You Want a New Job. Now What? Four UChicago Grads Have Advice</a>” (<em>Core</em>, Winter/16)</p> <p>“<a href="http://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/how-get-job-if-you’re-stay-home-mom" target="_self">How to Get a Job if You’re a Stay-at-Home Mom</a>” (<em>University of Chicago Magazine</em>, web exclusives, 02.09.2016)</p> <p>“<a href="http://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/find-new-job-two-hours" target="_self">Find a New Job in Two Hours</a>” (<em>University of Chicago Magazine</em>, web exclusives, 01.08.2015)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-relatedlinks field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p><a href="http://www.elatiaabate.com/" target="_blank">Learn</a> more about Abate’s coaching business.</p> <p><a href="https://twitter.com/elaabate" target="_blank">Follow</a> @elaabate on Twitter.</p> <p><a href="http://www.careers.uchicagoalumni.org/jb_index.html" target="_blank">Find a new gig</a> on the Alumni Career Programs job board.</p> <p><a href="https://www.linkedin.com/groups/39123" target="_blank">Connect with fellow alumni</a> on LinkedIn.</p> <p><a href="https://alumniandfriends.uchicago.edu/career-resources" target="_blank">Learn more about career resources</a> offered by the Alumni Association.</p> <p>Just getting your career started? <a href="https://careeradvancement.uchicago.edu" target="_blank">Log in to the Career Resource Center</a> to view internships, job postings, event listings, and more.</p> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/economics-business/yes-you-can-find-job-you-dont-hate" data-a2a-title="Yes, you can find a job you don’t hate"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Feconomics-business%2Fyes-you-can-find-job-you-dont-hate&amp;title=Yes%2C%20you%20can%20find%20a%20job%20you%20don%E2%80%99t%20hate"></a></span> Wed, 02 Nov 2016 22:04:09 +0000 jmiller 6030 at https://mag.uchicago.edu How to be a superconnector https://mag.uchicago.edu/economics-business/how-be-superconnector <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/1609_Golus_How-to-be-superconnector.jpg" width="1600" height="743" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/jmiller" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">jmiller</span></span> <span>Tue, 09/13/2016 - 16:10</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item">(<a href="https://www.pexels.com/photo/people-apple-iphone-writing-154/" target="_blank">Photography</a> by Alejandro Escamilla, courtesy Pexels/Unsplash.com)</div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/carrie-golus-ab91-am93"> <a href="/author/carrie-golus-ab91-am93"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Carrie Golus, AB’91, AM’93</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/web-exclusives" hreflang="en">Web exclusives</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item"><p>09.13.2016</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Consultant Marian Zizzo explains how to build your global network.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item">Last month the <a href="https://research.chicagobooth.edu/polsky/" target="_blank">Polsky Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation</a> hosted GiveGetWin’s <a href="http://summer.givegetwin.com" target="_blank">summer bootcamp</a>, a free two-week program for aspiring entrepreneurs. (<a href="https://www.givegetwin.com/" target="_blank">GiveGetWin</a> is like <a href="https://www.groupon.com/" target="_blank">Groupon</a>, but it’s run by volunteers, the goods and services for sale are donated, and all money raised goes to charity.) Each weekday of the camp, a different industry expert somewhere in the world hosted a webinar for the group. The final speaker was <a href="https://www.linkedin.com/in/marianzizzo" target="_blank">Marian Zizzo</a>, founder of the Bay Area consulting firm Triple Impact Partners, which “assists social enterprises with global expansion strategies, business modeling, partnerships, business development, and corporate philanthropy.” Zizzo explained how, in four years, she transformed herself from a graduate student with “no network whatsoever. I didn’t even have a LinkedIn account” to a business owner with a “pretty extensive global network.” Her three-part process: <h2>Step one</h2> <strong>Proactively help others in their work.</strong> Give something to your professional contacts without being asked or requesting anything in return. It could be as simple as sending someone an article with a short note, Zizzo says: “This made me think of you.” Introduce your network to your network, preferably through “offline interactions,” such as dinners, salons, or hangouts. Invite six to eight people—a small enough group for one conversation. Consider setting a theme to discuss. Ask questions, going around the table so everyone can answer. End with one final question: What is your biggest challenge right now? What do you need help with? Afterward connect everyone by email. You can also connect contacts by electronically introducing people who could help each other. Be sure to ask both people first before you share email addresses. “Please do not be the person who sends the email without asking for permission,” Zizzo says. “Right now,” she tells the group, “think of 10 people you want to help this year. Make an intentional list of 10 people.” Figure out a way to give back before you ask for anything. <h2>Step two</h2> <strong>Help people when they ask.</strong> “It’s hard to ask for help,” Zizzo says. If somebody is asking you, they must see you as a leader—an expert in something. “We all have the same 168 hours per week. Set aside a few of those hours to help other people.” That might mean reviewing a blog post before it goes live, sitting in on an investor meeting, or participating in a beta test of a new app. Wherever you are in your career, there’s always someone a little bit behind you. Consider becoming a mentor. “I promise you, you’ll get more out of it than they will,” Zizzo says. Volunteering is important too. Whatever you feel passionately about—maybe sending books to Tanzania or cooling down the planet—find some time to work on it. <a href="https://www.volunteermatch.org/" target="_blank">VolunteerMatch.org</a> and <a href="https://movingworlds.org/" target="_blank">MovingWorlds</a> are good places to start, as is GiveGetWin, the sponsor of the bootcamp. “I can’t say enough about how much volunteering enriches your network,” Zizzo says. “Seventy five percent of my deep network has come from volunteer work.” <h2>Step three</h2> <strong>Ask for help yourself.</strong> “One of my main recommendations is to ask for mentorship,” says Zizzo. “I would not be in this position without a fleet of mentors.” Think of some people in your life you respect. Ask if you can email them regularly—“once a week or once a month, whatever feels right”—to update them on your goals and career progress. “Do this for six months and see what ends up happening. I promise you, magic happens.” Online you can ask for recommendations and testimonials—on LinkedIn, for example. You can also use your online connections to build your network while you’re traveling. Say you’re planning to visit Mexico City. Ask your contacts what you should do there and if there’s anyone you should meet. Try to stay with locals. “I just went to 10 different states, staying with different people. Supporters of every political party,” Zizzo says. Staying in someone’s home “breaks down cultural barriers,” she says. It’s those authentic connections that help build a strong global network.</div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/economics-business" hreflang="en">Economics &amp; Business</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-refformats field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/formats/list" hreflang="en">List</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-relatedstories field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>“<a href="http://mag.uchicago.edu/economics-business/networking-introverts" target="_self">Networking Differently Could Increase Your Salary</a>” (<em>Chicago Booth Review</em>, 09.01.2016)</p> <p>“<a href="http://mag.uchicago.edu/economics-business/networking-introverts" target="_self">Networking for Introverts</a>” (<em>University of Chicago Magazine</em>, web exclusives, 08.12.2016)</p> <p>“<a href="http://mag.uchicago.edu/economics-business/you’re-graduating-now-what" target="_self">You’re Graduating. Now What?</a>” (<em>University of Chicago Magazine</em>, web exclusives, 08.31.2016)</p> <p>“</a><a href="http://mag.uchicago.edu/economics-business/how-job-search-has-changed-2008" target="_self">How the Job Search Has Changed Since 2008</a>” (<em>University of Chicago Magazine</em>, web exclusives, 07.20.2016)</p> <p>“<a href="http://thecore.uchicago.edu/Winter2016/features/insider-information.shtml" target="_blank">Insider Information: So You Want a New Job. Now What? Four UChicago Grads Have Advice</a>” (<em>Core</em>, Winter/16)</p> <p>“<a href="http://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/how-get-job-if-you’re-stay-home-mom" target="_self">How to Get a Job if You’re a Stay-at-Home Mom</a>” (<em>University of Chicago Magazine</em>, web exclusives, 02.09.2016)</p> <p>“<a href="http://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/find-new-job-two-hours" target="_self">Find a New Job in Two Hours</a>” (<em>University of Chicago Magazine</em>, web exclusives, 01.08.2015)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-relatedlinks field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p><a href="https://research.chicagobooth.edu/polsky/" target="_blank">Learn</a> more about the Polsky Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation.</p> <p><a href="https://research.chicagobooth.edu/polsky/programs-and-events" target="_blank">Check</a> out upcoming Polsky Center events.</p> <p><a href="https://twitter.com/polskycenter" target="_blank">Follow</a> @polskycenter on Twitter.</p> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/economics-business/how-be-superconnector" data-a2a-title="How to be a superconnector"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Feconomics-business%2Fhow-be-superconnector&amp;title=How%20to%20be%20a%20superconnector"></a></span> Tue, 13 Sep 2016 21:10:16 +0000 jmiller 5939 at https://mag.uchicago.edu Networking for introverts https://mag.uchicago.edu/economics-business/networking-introverts <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/1608_Hadavas_Networking-introverts.jpg" width="1600" height="743" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/jmiller" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">jmiller</span></span> <span>Fri, 08/12/2016 - 11:52</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>“It almost doesn’t matter that you’re ‘an introvert,’” says career coach Elatia Abate, AB’99, MBA’08. “What matters is who you need to be to get a job done.” (Pexels.com)</p> <p>Below: Portrait of Abate. (Courtesy Elatia Abate)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/chloe-hadavas-ab17"> <a href="/author/chloe-hadavas-ab17"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Chloe Hadavas, AB’17</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/web-exclusives" hreflang="en">Web exclusives</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item"><p>08.12.2016</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item">How to survive the most harrowing part of the job search.</div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Whether it’s a career fair, recruiting event, or one-on-one conversation, networking can be a drag. For many, it’s the most harrowing part of the job search, an intimidating social ritual quickly performed and then avoided.</p> <p><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/1607_Golus_Job-search-change-since-2008_spotA.jpg" align="right" />Elatia Abate, AB’99, MBA’08, knows how hard it can be to put yourself out there. A self-professed introvert, she’s had to overcome her “preferred, natural state of being” to achieve professional success as a career coach. With plenty of practice along the way—she’s had “800 different kinds of jobs”—networking has become second nature to her.</p> <p>“If you want to create opportunities, if you want to create the kind of success and impact that I know students who are coming from UChicago do, it almost doesn’t matter that you’re an introvert,” Abate says. “What matters is who you need to be to get a job done.”</p> <p>So here are three tips to getting that job done.</p> <h2>Tip one</h2> <p><strong>Don’t hide behind technology.</strong></p> <p>“Thanks to technology,” Abate says, “people’s perception of what networking is and how networking should be has changed.” She notes that many use text messages and emails in place of face-to-face interactions.</p> <p>“But an email conversation is <em>not</em> the same thing as a personal connection,” she stresses. Only use these platforms to help create the real networking opportunities.</p> <h2>Tip two</h2> <p><strong>Practice before you get there.</strong></p> <p>Strike up conversations with people when you’re walking down the street, at the gas station, or in your local cafe. Go into a coffee shop and ask the barista, “How’s your day going? What’s going on here? Anything new today?”</p> <p>“If it’s awkward at the coffee shop, you never have to go back,” Abate says. But you can work out the kinks in your conversation before entering a situation where your words may have a greater impact.</p> <p>Just remember not to overthink it—you don’t have to be perfectly articulate and poised 100 percent of the time. Networking “really is just practicing being in conversation,” Abate reiterates.</p> <h2>Tip three</h2> <p><strong>Go in with a mindset of curiosity. </strong></p> <p>Think of it as a classroom. When you change your mindset, Abate says, “It’s not like you’re learning a skill that’s so foreign after all.” You’re simply asking intelligent questions and exploring a new intellectual realm.</p> <p>Do your research before going to a large networking or recruiting event. When you get there, make your presence known by walking up to the representatives from the companies you’re interested in. “Wait until there’s a point in the conversation where you’ve got a really good question,” Abate advises. Always look for opportunities to chime in with a “Hey, that’s interesting. It’s funny that you say that,” or “I’m so curious about x.”</p> <p>Networking shouldn’t be about getting something from others, or taking up their time. “If you assume that all of us are adults and we’re capable of managing our own calendars,” Abate says, “no one is going to say yes to talk to you who doesn’t have the time to do it.”</p> <p>The key to networking, Abate believes, is accepting that it’s a process of discovery: “Let your curiosity naturally take you.”</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/economics-business" hreflang="en">Economics &amp; Business</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/careers" hreflang="en">Careers</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/jobs" hreflang="en">Jobs</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refuchicago field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/career-advancement" hreflang="en">Career Advancement</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refformats field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/formats/list" hreflang="en">List</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-relatedstories field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>“<a href="http://mag.uchicago.edu/economics-business/how-job-search-has-changed-2008" target="_self">How the Job Search Has Changed since 2008</a>” (<em>University of Chicago Magazine</em>, web exclusives, 07.20.2016)</p> <p>“<a href="http://thecore.uchicago.edu/Winter2016/features/insider-information.shtml" target="_blank">Insider Information: So You Want a New Job. Now What? Four UChicago Grads Have Advice</a>” (<em>Core</em>, Winter/16)</p> <p>“<a href="http://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/how-get-job-if-you’re-stay-home-mom" target="_self">How to Get a Job if You’re a Stay-at-home Mom</a>” (<em>University of Chicago Magazine</em>, web exclusives, 02.09.2016)</p> <p>“<a href="http://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/find-new-job-two-hours" target="_self">Find a New Job in Two Hours</a>” (<em>University of Chicago Magazine</em>, web exclusives, 01.08.2015)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-relatedlinks field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p><a href="http://www.elatiaabate.com/" target="_blank">Learn</a> more about Abate’s coaching business.</p> <p><a href="https://twitter.com/elaabate" target="_blank">Follow</a> @elaabate on Twitter.</p> <p><a href="http://www.careers.uchicagoalumni.org/jb_index.html" target="_blank">Find a new gig</a> on the Alumni Career Programs job board.</p> <p><a href="https://www.linkedin.com/groups/39123" target="_blank">Connect with fellow alumni</a> on LinkedIn.</p> <p><a href="https://alumniandfriends.uchicago.edu/career-resources" target="_blank">Learn more about career resources</a> offered by the Alumni Association.</p> <p>Just getting your career started? <a href="https://careeradvancement.uchicago.edu" target="_blank">Log in to the Career Resource Center</a> to view internships, job postings, event listings, and more.</p> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/economics-business/networking-introverts" data-a2a-title="Networking for introverts"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Feconomics-business%2Fnetworking-introverts&amp;title=Networking%20for%20introverts"></a></span> Fri, 12 Aug 2016 16:52:45 +0000 jmiller 5912 at https://mag.uchicago.edu