Jobs https://mag.uchicago.edu/tags/jobs en When what you do is no longer who you are https://mag.uchicago.edu/law-policy-society/when-what-you-do-no-longer-who-you-are <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/19_Winter_Allen_Glimpses.jpg" width="2000" height="1000" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/admin" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">admin</span></span> <span>Wed, 02/13/2019 - 10:40</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>(Photography by Don Campbell, courtesy University of Toronto Scarborough)</p></div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/susie-allen-ab09"> <a href="/author/susie-allen-ab09"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Susie Allen, AB’09</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/university-chicago-magazine" hreflang="en">The University of Chicago Magazine</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item">Winter/19</div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Retirement doesn’t always live up to the blissful media image.</p></div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>For some workers, especially those who were deeply devoted to their professions, retiring is a transition fraught with ambivalence, grief, and the fear of obsolescence—emotions that too often go ignored and undiscussed. That’s the argument of <strong>Michelle Pannor Silver</strong>’s (PhD’10) first book, <em>Retirement and Its Discontents: Why We Won’t Stop Working, Even if We Can</em> (Columbia University Press, 2018).</p> <p>The book draws on interviews with CEOs, doctors, and academics. These individuals talk about the search for meaning in the aftermath of careers that defined them. Silver also spoke with former homemakers and elite athletes—people who feel their retirement is as misunderstood as their labor was.</p> <p>Silver, an assistant professor of sociology at the University of Toronto, says her book was inspired by the quantitative research she did as a PhD student at Harris Public Policy, analyzing survey data from health and retirement studies. “I always wanted to ask those data points questions and hear their stories,” she says. (Silver hasn’t abandoned quantitative research altogether and continues to study health economics, with a focus on elderly populations.)</p> <p>Silver’s book is focused on those with the financial means to retire. She knows that many Americans don’t have that luxury but believes the experiences of this fortunate group offer important insights about ageism in a society where life expectancies are longer than ever before, and people aren’t ready to be counted out after their 65th birthdays. This interview has been edited and condensed.</p> <hr /><h2>Why do you think it’s important to be more candid about the challenges of retirement?</h2> <p>Retirement is a financial change, an emotional change, and a structural change. It’s an everything change. It’s entering into a phase of life that we don’t talk about much in a realistic way.</p> <p>As a society, we pay a lot of attention to early career transitions. And of course we should pay attention to that; it’s important and difficult to make your way into the workforce. But we spend almost no time thinking about getting out of it.</p> <h2>Several of the people you interviewed had negative experiences with their retirement parties. Why is that? Should we do away with retirement parties altogether?</h2> <p>I hate to say no to parties. One should never give up the opportunity to celebrate and have fun. Some people can’t retire early enough. So you can’t take away their parties.</p> <p>But you’re right—some people really, really struggled with their parties. One in particular, Robert, an academic, told me that it felt like a funeral. He was sitting there listening to people talk about the work he had done, and everything was being said in the past tense. At a certain point, he had to just tune out. He started mentally working on an article that he was writing.</p> <p>He was so frustrated by the experience. He realized, “This is not the end of me. I still have a lot more that I am going to do”—but there was an assumption that he was done. In a lot of ways, retirement is the opposite of a party for someone who identifies very closely with what they do professionally.</p> <h2>It seems like many people, even those who are excited to retire, struggle with the sudden lack of routine.</h2> <p>When every day becomes a potential Saturday or Sunday, it can be really confusing. The most extreme examples were probably the CEOs I interviewed. Some of them had up to three different administrative assistants managing their schedules. They described this sense of, “Nobody’s planning anything for me, and so what is my worth?” They had gotten so used to thinking of their worth as based not only on their income but also on the fact that they needed all these secretaries.</p> <h2>You include the stories of people such as homemakers who don’t quite fit our cultural image of retirees. Why?</h2> <p>Precisely because they were nontraditional. The homemakers, for example, self-identified as being retired, yet they meet no economist’s definition of a retiree. But they defined themselves that way, and that gave me pause. We make assumptions that are different than the way people define themselves, and I’m not sure who’s wrong.</p> <p>All the people in the book identified very strongly with the type of work they did, which is why I think their retirements were filled with discontent—because they had never experienced being adults without that. The homemakers were no exception. They were very clear about the fact that they had worked their whole adulthood, although they were not paid for their work.</p> <p>Both homemakers and former CEOs missed their roles and lamented no longer being needed and no longer being able to wear that identifying marker. It left them feeling lonely in ways that were really similar.</p> <h2>How can we support friends, parents, and colleagues as they transition to retirement?</h2> <p>We can avoid imposing social norms that have infiltrated our experiences about age—so not saying, “Oh, you just had a big birthday. You must be planning for retirement,” or dropping hints about winding down.</p> <p>Many, many people’s most creative, interesting work and highest levels of productivity come later in the life course, so making assumptions that people are not able to contribute—that’s something to avoid.</p> <p>Instead, be open-minded and encourage the person—asking, “What’s next?” or “How are you going to pivot within your work?” Try not to view aging as essentially negative.</p> <p>Keeping people engaged, productive, and active is helpful not just at an individual level but also for the sustainability of the health care system. When people are socially engaged and feel important, they tend to move more and tend to stay out of the hospital more.</p> <h2>What helps people who loved their jobs have a more positive transition to retirement?</h2> <p>I’ve done some work with physicians who have been on call for decades—woken up in the middle of the night and expected to immediately jump into that work role. They go from giving 110 percent to zero when they retire. The lesson there is, try to start practicing not giving 110 percent all the time. Practice taking a real lunch. Just start with that.</p> <p>If at all possible, try to develop hobbies earlier in adulthood, especially if you’re the kind of person who needs to be good at what you do. It can help to think back—earlier in your life, what kinds of things did you always want to do? And that’s when people start to remember, “Oh, yeah, I always wanted to learn art history,” or “I always wanted to use my hands and to try to do some kind of carpentry,” or whatever it is.</p> <p>The bottom line is, take the skills that made you good at your work—whether it was being a good listener, or being a good researcher, whatever that skill set was—and try to apply it to yourself. Apply those skills to study what makes you happy and what you want to do. Investing even a fraction of the energy that you invest into your work into what you want to do next can be really helpful.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/law-policy-society" hreflang="en">Law, Policy &amp; Society</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/work" hreflang="en">Work</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/retirement" hreflang="en">Retirement</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/jobs" hreflang="en">Jobs</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refformats field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/formats/glimpses" hreflang="en">Glimpses</a></div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/law-policy-society/when-what-you-do-no-longer-who-you-are" data-a2a-title="When what you do is no longer who you are"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Flaw-policy-society%2Fwhen-what-you-do-no-longer-who-you-are&amp;title=When%20what%20you%20do%20is%20no%20longer%20who%20you%20are"></a></span> Wed, 13 Feb 2019 16:40:55 +0000 admin 7051 at https://mag.uchicago.edu Career counseling from the Businesslady https://mag.uchicago.edu/economics-business/career-counseling-businesslady <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/1706_Allen_Career-counseling-Businesslady.jpg" width="1600" height="743" alt="laptop and glasses" title="laptop and glasses" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/jmiller" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">jmiller</span></span> <span>Tue, 06/20/2017 - 13:01</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>(Above: <a href="https://www.pexels.com/photo/business-composition-desk-eyeglasses-393044/" target="_blank"> Photography</a> by Alexandr Bricky; below: Photo courtesy Courtney C. W. Guerra)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/susie-allen-ab09"> <a href="/author/susie-allen-ab09"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Susie Allen, AB’09</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/web-exclusives" hreflang="en">Web exclusives</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item">06.20.2017</div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>In her new book, Courtney C. W. Guerra, AB’05, offers witty work advice.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><img align="right" src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/1706_Allen_Career-counseling-Businesslady_spotA.jpg" />For two years <strong>Courtney C. W. Guerra</strong>, AB’05, juggled a secret identity. By day Guerra worked as the senior writer for grants and fellowships in the Division of the Humanities at UChicago. By night she was the witty, anonymous voice of the <a href="https://dearbusinesslady.com/category/dear-businesslady/dear-businesslady-the-toast/" target="_blank">Dear Businesslady</a> workplace advice column for the now-defunct website the <em>Toast</em>. (Guerra now <a href="https://dearbusinesslady.com/category/dear-businesslady/dear-businesslady-the-billfold/" target="_blank">answers questions</a> on the financial advice website the<em> Billfold</em>.) Guerra blew her own cover with <a href="https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/32163111-is-this-working" target="_blank"><em>Is This Working? The Businesslady’s Guide to Getting What You Want from Your Career</em></a> (Adams Media, 2017), a book drawing on the “Dear Businesslady” column but published under her real name.</p> <p>The book offers practical tips on landing a job (“For the love of any and all higher powers, do NOT try to participate in a phone interview while doing anything else”) and guidance on navigating thorny interpersonal issues at work (“You can <em>fantasize</em> about delivering a scathing monologue to your boss and then storming out as the office explodes behind you, but you can’t actually <em>do </em>that, … at least not in the real world, where people live”).</p> <p>For <em>Is This Working?</em>, Guerra pulled from her own winding career path. Throughout college she told people she planned to become a teacher, “mainly because that was a really good way of shutting people down when they [asked], ‘Why are you majoring in English?’” After graduation she worked as an executive assistant, then transitioned to grant writing, a job she hadn’t known about in school. Guerra spoke to the <em>Magazine</em> about how her Businesslady alter ego has changed her approach to her own work, when to keep a less-than-perfect job, and why writing an advice column is like editing. Her comments have been condensed and edited.</p> <hr /><h2>Why “businesslady”?</h2> <p>Back when it was a column, I wanted it to be anonymous, partly because there’s a long tradition of anonymous advice columns. And “businesslady” is a word I’ve always found funny. My mom thinks it’s hilarious, which I love. I wanted to signal that I was a woman since the <em>Toast</em> had a very strong female perspective. I wanted to let people have a little sliver of who I was as a person. I don't work in a corporate business, so there’s a way in which it’s a bit of a misnomer, but it gets the point across.</p> <h2>Did writing the Businesslady column make you approach your own work differently?</h2> <p>I have always tried to approach my work in a way that’s kind to my colleagues and responsible. But there was certainly an added pressure. If I totally screwed something up or started behaving unprofessionally, that would be so off-brand. There’s a kind of “physician, heal thyself” quality that has started to creep into my mindset. It helped me to think of all problems or situations as having solutions. So if I was feeling frustrated I could take a step back, like, “If I got a letter that had these components, what would I say?” and, OK, maybe I should just do that.</p> <h2>Your book is coming out at a time when there’s so much anxiety about work and the future of work. Did you think about that as you were writing?</h2> <p>As soon as the column actually took off, there was a feeling of, I don't want to steer people in the wrong direction and mess up their actual lives. As much as I want people to find jobs that they enjoy and find satisfying and challenging, jobs are also the mechanism by which people can feed themselves and pay for their shelter. I try to emphasize the fact that there’s a huge set of considerations you have to factor in when you’re making any kind of professional decision. So if you have a robust savings account and you really want to make a move and take a big risk and it’s a lifelong dream, then go for it. But if it’s just that your job isn’t as fun as it could be, why not just keep doing your less-than-great job for a little while and use your spare time to send out résumés and pursue other opportunities? You never know how long it’ll be until you have a job again. For most people, I think a not-great job is better than no job.</p> <h2>How has your background shaped the advice you give?</h2> <p>Overall my perspective is informed by the fact that I do so much editing. When you’re editing, you sometimes change a sentence and say, “This is better,” but usually, if you’re working with the writer, you want to also explain <em>why</em>. Similarly, as a writer, sometimes an editor will offer an alternative and you’ll say, “Oh God, not that, that’s so much worse.” But the process helps you realize what it was that you were hoping the sentence would do in the first place and brings you to the point where you can fix the sentence and feel satisfied with it. I approach a lot of the advice in the same way: well, this is what I would do because of this thought process. And even if someone doesn’t share that thought process or thinks that it’s wrong, hopefully it gives them an opportunity to reframe their own decision making in a way that helps them feel confident in whatever they do end up doing.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/economics-business" hreflang="en">Economics &amp; Business</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/careers" hreflang="en">Careers</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/jobs" hreflang="en">Jobs</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/advice" hreflang="en">Advice</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refuchicago field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/college-alumni" hreflang="en">College alumni</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/humanities-division" hreflang="en">Division of the Humanities</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refformats field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/formats/interview" hreflang="en">Interview</a></div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/economics-business/career-counseling-businesslady" data-a2a-title="Career counseling from the Businesslady"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Feconomics-business%2Fcareer-counseling-businesslady&amp;title=Career%20counseling%20from%20the%20Businesslady"></a></span> Tue, 20 Jun 2017 18:01:46 +0000 jmiller 6540 at https://mag.uchicago.edu Yes, you can find a job you don’t hate https://mag.uchicago.edu/economics-business/yes-you-can-find-job-you-dont-hate <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/1611_Hadavas_Yes-you-can-find-job-you-dont-hate_1.jpg" width="1600" height="743" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/jmiller" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">jmiller</span></span> <span>Wed, 11/02/2016 - 17:04</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>The fairy tale of finding your singular calling is enticing, says Elatia Abate, AB’99, MBA’08, but the reality is that the job search is about lifelong discovery. (Collage by Joy Olivia Miller)</p> <p>Below: Portrait of Abate. (Courtesy Elatia Abate)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/chloe-hadavas-ab17"> <a href="/author/chloe-hadavas-ab17"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Chloe Hadavas, AB’17</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/web-exclusives" hreflang="en">Web exclusives</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item"><p>10.31.2016</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>How to carve out your niche in the job market.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/1607_Golus_Job-search-change-since-2008_spotA.jpg" align="right" />The modern job market can leave workers dissatisfied. Despite the huge number of networking and career events intended to help job seekers, many people never find work they truly enjoy. Why? While the current system is good at filling open positions efficiently, explains career coach Elatia Abate, AB’99, MBA’08, “it doesn’t necessarily confer what we as human beings want to create.” Still, she argues, within this imperfect structure, we can carve out our own niche to reach career satisfaction. Here are three of Abate’s tips for constructing that path to fulfillment. <h2>Tip one</h2> <strong>Accept that there is no one perfect job.</strong> The myth of finding your singular calling is enticing, Abate says, but the reality is that the job search should be about lifelong discovery. “So stop worrying about getting the perfect job and really just focus on doing something that’s going to help you continue with the life of the mind and create a life that is interesting and engaging for you.” <h2>Tip two</h2> <strong>Learn from unfulfilling experiences.</strong> When you are not as enthusiastic about a job as you’d hoped, take a few steps back. Ask yourself, “Why is it that I want to leave? What is it that I want to create instead? What about this job is working for me?” “It’s never all bad,” insists Abate, “even in uncomfortable situations.” At the very least you’re learning something. Pay attention to what you like and—more importantly—dislike. If you decide to leave, make sure you have a direction going forward: “Don’t assume you’ll just figure it out later.” <h2>Tip three</h2> <strong>Don’t lose your sense of curiosity and agency.</strong> Recognize that you have the power to create a career of happiness. Don’t give up on being curious, excited, and engaged in the world as you navigate the job market. Invoking Joseph Campbell, Abate believes that people are not looking for the meaning of life but for the experience of being alive. “For me, this is what [finding a career] is really all about,” she says. “Why do we lose that sense of adventure and being alive when we simply don’t have to?”</div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/economics-business" hreflang="en">Economics &amp; Business</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/careers" hreflang="en">Careers</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/jobs" hreflang="en">Jobs</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refuchicago field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/career-advancement" hreflang="en">Career Advancement</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refformats field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/formats/list" hreflang="en">List</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-relatedstories field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>“<a href="http://mag.uchicago.edu/economics-business/networking-introverts" target="_self">Networking for Introverts</a>” (<em>University of Chicago Magazine</em>, web exclusives, 08.12.2016)</p> <p>“<a href="http://mag.uchicago.edu/economics-business/how-job-search-has-changed-2008" target="_self">How the Job Search Has Changed since 2008</a>” (<em>University of Chicago Magazine</em>, web exclusives, 07.20.2016)</p> <p>“<a href="http://thecore.uchicago.edu/Winter2016/features/insider-information.shtml" target="_blank">Insider Information: So You Want a New Job. Now What? Four UChicago Grads Have Advice</a>” (<em>Core</em>, Winter/16)</p> <p>“<a href="http://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/how-get-job-if-you’re-stay-home-mom" target="_self">How to Get a Job if You’re a Stay-at-Home Mom</a>” (<em>University of Chicago Magazine</em>, web exclusives, 02.09.2016)</p> <p>“<a href="http://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/find-new-job-two-hours" target="_self">Find a New Job in Two Hours</a>” (<em>University of Chicago Magazine</em>, web exclusives, 01.08.2015)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-relatedlinks field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p><a href="http://www.elatiaabate.com/" target="_blank">Learn</a> more about Abate’s coaching business.</p> <p><a href="https://twitter.com/elaabate" target="_blank">Follow</a> @elaabate on Twitter.</p> <p><a href="http://www.careers.uchicagoalumni.org/jb_index.html" target="_blank">Find a new gig</a> on the Alumni Career Programs job board.</p> <p><a href="https://www.linkedin.com/groups/39123" target="_blank">Connect with fellow alumni</a> on LinkedIn.</p> <p><a href="https://alumniandfriends.uchicago.edu/career-resources" target="_blank">Learn more about career resources</a> offered by the Alumni Association.</p> <p>Just getting your career started? <a href="https://careeradvancement.uchicago.edu" target="_blank">Log in to the Career Resource Center</a> to view internships, job postings, event listings, and more.</p> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/economics-business/yes-you-can-find-job-you-dont-hate" data-a2a-title="Yes, you can find a job you don’t hate"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Feconomics-business%2Fyes-you-can-find-job-you-dont-hate&amp;title=Yes%2C%20you%20can%20find%20a%20job%20you%20don%E2%80%99t%20hate"></a></span> Wed, 02 Nov 2016 22:04:09 +0000 jmiller 6030 at https://mag.uchicago.edu Networking for introverts https://mag.uchicago.edu/economics-business/networking-introverts <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/1608_Hadavas_Networking-introverts.jpg" width="1600" height="743" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/jmiller" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">jmiller</span></span> <span>Fri, 08/12/2016 - 11:52</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>“It almost doesn’t matter that you’re ‘an introvert,’” says career coach Elatia Abate, AB’99, MBA’08. “What matters is who you need to be to get a job done.” (Pexels.com)</p> <p>Below: Portrait of Abate. (Courtesy Elatia Abate)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/chloe-hadavas-ab17"> <a href="/author/chloe-hadavas-ab17"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Chloe Hadavas, AB’17</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/web-exclusives" hreflang="en">Web exclusives</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item"><p>08.12.2016</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item">How to survive the most harrowing part of the job search.</div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Whether it’s a career fair, recruiting event, or one-on-one conversation, networking can be a drag. For many, it’s the most harrowing part of the job search, an intimidating social ritual quickly performed and then avoided.</p> <p><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/1607_Golus_Job-search-change-since-2008_spotA.jpg" align="right" />Elatia Abate, AB’99, MBA’08, knows how hard it can be to put yourself out there. A self-professed introvert, she’s had to overcome her “preferred, natural state of being” to achieve professional success as a career coach. With plenty of practice along the way—she’s had “800 different kinds of jobs”—networking has become second nature to her.</p> <p>“If you want to create opportunities, if you want to create the kind of success and impact that I know students who are coming from UChicago do, it almost doesn’t matter that you’re an introvert,” Abate says. “What matters is who you need to be to get a job done.”</p> <p>So here are three tips to getting that job done.</p> <h2>Tip one</h2> <p><strong>Don’t hide behind technology.</strong></p> <p>“Thanks to technology,” Abate says, “people’s perception of what networking is and how networking should be has changed.” She notes that many use text messages and emails in place of face-to-face interactions.</p> <p>“But an email conversation is <em>not</em> the same thing as a personal connection,” she stresses. Only use these platforms to help create the real networking opportunities.</p> <h2>Tip two</h2> <p><strong>Practice before you get there.</strong></p> <p>Strike up conversations with people when you’re walking down the street, at the gas station, or in your local cafe. Go into a coffee shop and ask the barista, “How’s your day going? What’s going on here? Anything new today?”</p> <p>“If it’s awkward at the coffee shop, you never have to go back,” Abate says. But you can work out the kinks in your conversation before entering a situation where your words may have a greater impact.</p> <p>Just remember not to overthink it—you don’t have to be perfectly articulate and poised 100 percent of the time. Networking “really is just practicing being in conversation,” Abate reiterates.</p> <h2>Tip three</h2> <p><strong>Go in with a mindset of curiosity. </strong></p> <p>Think of it as a classroom. When you change your mindset, Abate says, “It’s not like you’re learning a skill that’s so foreign after all.” You’re simply asking intelligent questions and exploring a new intellectual realm.</p> <p>Do your research before going to a large networking or recruiting event. When you get there, make your presence known by walking up to the representatives from the companies you’re interested in. “Wait until there’s a point in the conversation where you’ve got a really good question,” Abate advises. Always look for opportunities to chime in with a “Hey, that’s interesting. It’s funny that you say that,” or “I’m so curious about x.”</p> <p>Networking shouldn’t be about getting something from others, or taking up their time. “If you assume that all of us are adults and we’re capable of managing our own calendars,” Abate says, “no one is going to say yes to talk to you who doesn’t have the time to do it.”</p> <p>The key to networking, Abate believes, is accepting that it’s a process of discovery: “Let your curiosity naturally take you.”</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/economics-business" hreflang="en">Economics &amp; Business</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/careers" hreflang="en">Careers</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/jobs" hreflang="en">Jobs</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refuchicago field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/career-advancement" hreflang="en">Career Advancement</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refformats field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/formats/list" hreflang="en">List</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-relatedstories field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>“<a href="http://mag.uchicago.edu/economics-business/how-job-search-has-changed-2008" target="_self">How the Job Search Has Changed since 2008</a>” (<em>University of Chicago Magazine</em>, web exclusives, 07.20.2016)</p> <p>“<a href="http://thecore.uchicago.edu/Winter2016/features/insider-information.shtml" target="_blank">Insider Information: So You Want a New Job. Now What? Four UChicago Grads Have Advice</a>” (<em>Core</em>, Winter/16)</p> <p>“<a href="http://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/how-get-job-if-you’re-stay-home-mom" target="_self">How to Get a Job if You’re a Stay-at-home Mom</a>” (<em>University of Chicago Magazine</em>, web exclusives, 02.09.2016)</p> <p>“<a href="http://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/find-new-job-two-hours" target="_self">Find a New Job in Two Hours</a>” (<em>University of Chicago Magazine</em>, web exclusives, 01.08.2015)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-relatedlinks field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p><a href="http://www.elatiaabate.com/" target="_blank">Learn</a> more about Abate’s coaching business.</p> <p><a href="https://twitter.com/elaabate" target="_blank">Follow</a> @elaabate on Twitter.</p> <p><a href="http://www.careers.uchicagoalumni.org/jb_index.html" target="_blank">Find a new gig</a> on the Alumni Career Programs job board.</p> <p><a href="https://www.linkedin.com/groups/39123" target="_blank">Connect with fellow alumni</a> on LinkedIn.</p> <p><a href="https://alumniandfriends.uchicago.edu/career-resources" target="_blank">Learn more about career resources</a> offered by the Alumni Association.</p> <p>Just getting your career started? <a href="https://careeradvancement.uchicago.edu" target="_blank">Log in to the Career Resource Center</a> to view internships, job postings, event listings, and more.</p> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/economics-business/networking-introverts" data-a2a-title="Networking for introverts"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Feconomics-business%2Fnetworking-introverts&amp;title=Networking%20for%20introverts"></a></span> Fri, 12 Aug 2016 16:52:45 +0000 jmiller 5912 at https://mag.uchicago.edu How the job search has changed since 2008 https://mag.uchicago.edu/economics-business/how-job-search-has-changed-2008 <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/1607_Golus_Job-search-change-since-2008.jpg" width="1600" height="743" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/jmiller" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">jmiller</span></span> <span>Wed, 07/20/2016 - 11:20</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Gather information, build your network of contacts, be curious and patient, and eventually that job will come, says career coach Elatia Abate, AB’99, MBA’08. (<a href="https://www.pexels.com/" target="_blank">Pexels.com</a>)</p> <p>Below: Portrait of Abate. (Courtesy Elatia Abate)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/carrie-golus-ab91-am93"> <a href="/author/carrie-golus-ab91-am93"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Carrie Golus, AB’91, AM’93</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/web-exclusives" hreflang="en">Web exclusives</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item"><p>07.20.2016</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item">If you want a job now, says Elatia Abate, AB’99, MBA’08, learn the new rules.</div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item">When the economy was booming, says career coach Elatia Abate, AB’99, MBA’08, it was relatively easy to get a job. You put together a good résumé. You found a promising job online and applied for it. And you got hired pretty quickly. <img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/1607_Golus_Job-search-change-since-2008_spotA.jpg" align="right" />“Most people who are looking for a job now are still playing by those pre-2008 rules,” Abate says. But after 2008, the hiring dynamic changed. “Companies are preoccupied with mitigating risk. They don’t want to hire the wrong candidate. They’ve got all the time in the world to wait for the perfect person.” Abate worked in recruitment both before and after the market crash, most recently at Anheuser-Busch and Dow Jones. In 2014 she left the corporate world to start her own business as a career coach. She meets a lot of job seekers who haven’t updated their approach and feel really frustrated, she says: “Why does HR never get back to me? Why does it feel like I’m sending stuff into a black hole?” In the current market, the least successful way to look for a job is to apply online. The most successful is to try to “get into conversation with people,” Abate says. Once you’re past the denial phase (“It shouldn’t be this way. I shouldn’t have to do that.”), here are the three steps to finding a job. <h2>Step one</h2> <strong>Figure out exactly what you’re looking for and start telling people.</strong> “That doesn’t necessarily mean Graphic Designer 2 at Company X, making this much money. It doesn’t have to be that specific,” Abate says. But you do have to give yourself some parameters—say, you’re seeking a marketing position in consumer goods. That’s specific enough that it will help your network to help you. <h2>Step two</h2> <strong>Craft your online presence.</strong> “Google is the new résumé,” says Abate. If you’re looking to make a move to that marketing job in consumer goods, but your LinkedIn profile is all about your past industry in music, “there’s a big gap there.” Your online presence should reflect some semblance of the position you’re looking for. <h2>Step three</h2> <strong>Start doing those informational interviews. </strong> Figure out who you know in the industry or company you’re looking to join—or find these people online—and ask for informational interviews. “Not for a job, to be clear,” says Abate. “You are gathering information.” For middle-aged job seekers in particular, the idea of informational interviews can be daunting. “You might think, I’m embarrassed to ask for help, or I should have had it all figured out by now.” The important thing to remember is you’re just looking for information to “create your next opportunity,” Abate says. You’re not seeking a job from the person you’re talking to. Once you make that shift in attitude, “it completely changes the game. You have the power back.” Gather information, build your network of contacts, be curious and patient, and eventually that job will come.</div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/economics-business" hreflang="en">Economics &amp; Business</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/careers" hreflang="en">Careers</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/jobs" hreflang="en">Jobs</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refuchicago field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/career-advancement" hreflang="en">Career Advancement</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/college-alumni" hreflang="en">College alumni</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/graduate-alumni" hreflang="en">Graduate alumni</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refformats field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/formats/list" hreflang="en">List</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-relatedstories field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item">“<a href="http://thecore.uchicago.edu/Winter2016/features/insider-information.shtml" target="_blank">Insider Information: So You Want a New Job. Now What? Four UChicago Grads Have Advice</a>” (<em>Core</em>, Winter/16) “<a href="http://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/how-get-job-if-you’re-stay-home-mom" target="_self">How to Get a Job if You’re a Stay-at-home Mom</a>” (<em>University of Chicago Magazine</em>, web exclusives, 02.09.2016) “<a href="http://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/find-new-job-two-hours" target="_self">Find a New Job in Two Hours</a>” (<em>University of Chicago Magazine</em>, web exclusives, 01.08.2015)</div> <div class="field field--name-field-relatedlinks field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="http://www.careers.uchicagoalumni.org/jb_index.html" target="_blank">Find a new gig</a> on the Alumni Career Programs job board. <a href="https://www.linkedin.com/groups/39123" target="_blank">Connect with fellow alumni</a> on LinkedIn. <a href="https://alumniandfriends.uchicago.edu/career-resources" target="_blank">Learn more about career resources</a> offered by the Alumni Association. Just getting your career started? <a href="https://careeradvancement.uchicago.edu" target="_blank">Log in to the Career Resource Center</a> to view internships, job postings, event listings, and more.</div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/economics-business/how-job-search-has-changed-2008" data-a2a-title="How the job search has changed since 2008"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Feconomics-business%2Fhow-job-search-has-changed-2008&amp;title=How%20the%20job%20search%20has%20changed%20since%202008"></a></span> Wed, 20 Jul 2016 16:20:16 +0000 jmiller 5851 at https://mag.uchicago.edu The path more and more traveled https://mag.uchicago.edu/law-policy-society/path-more-and-more-traveled <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/1511_Allen_Path-more-more-traveled.jpg" width="1600" height="743" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/jmiller" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">jmiller</span></span> <span>Wed, 11/11/2015 - 15:03</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item">Psychology alumna turned data scientist Laurie Skelly says she learned how words and pictures can communicate sophisticated ideas in a digestible and memorable way. (Photography by Michael Schmidt/<em>Chicago Sun-Times</em>)</div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/susie-allen-ab09"> <a href="/author/susie-allen-ab09"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Susie Allen, AB’09</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/dialogo" hreflang="en">Dialogo</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Fall 2015/Winter 2016</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item">The Division of the Social Sciences helps graduate students find their place—inside and outside of academia.</div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item">Laurie Skelly, AM’09, PhD’12, had dreamed of a career in neuroscience since age 15. But when she reached the end of her graduate training in psychology at the University of Chicago, she faced what she calls “a crisis of motivation.”  Skelly knew it was time to look for a job outside the academy, even if she wasn’t quite sure how. “There’s a sea of people doing cool stuff, and I should go find a place in it,” she told herself. After several months of networking events and what she jokingly describes as “basically stalking,” Skelly found a position as a data scientist with the consulting firm <a href="http://datascopeanalytics.com" target="_blank">Datascope Analytics</a>—a job she saw as a perfect fit. Skelly is one of an increasing number of alumni who follow a path from graduate school to a career outside the academy. To help such students develop the necessary skills, the Division has strengthened its arsenal of resources.  Through its <a href="https://emergingleaders.uchicago.edu" target="_blank">Emerging Leaders Initiative</a>, started in fall 2013, the Division provides professional development events and internships in a variety of industries. These offerings supplement programs in each department, such as a new <a href="https://mellon.org" target="_blank">Mellon Foundation</a>–supported career program in the <a href="https://history.uchicago.edu" target="_blank">Department of History</a>. Emerging Leaders signals to graduate students that the Division supports students seeking a nonacademic career, says <a href="https://socialsciences.uchicago.edu/staff-leadership/kelly-therese-pollock" target="_blank">Kelly Pollock</a>, associate dean of students in the Division. “It’s in everybody’s best interests that our students have great careers, whatever those careers are.” According to Pollock, a main goal of the program is to help students realize they already have skills prized by employers. With their teaching, writing, and research abilities—and being able to manage a major project like a dissertation—graduate students are often more prepared for the job market than they realize.  Alumni supported that message at an Emerging Leaders event, now in its third year, this past May. At <a href="https://emergingleaders.uchicago.edu/content/charting-your-own-path-career-diversity-social-scientists" target="_blank">Charting Your Own Path: Career Diversity for Social Scientists</a>, Social Sciences alumni recalled their paths from graduate school to nonacademic careers. When applying for jobs, John Balz, AM’07, PhD’10, found it helpful to “look at my dissertation through the lens of project management.” It was proof to employers he could finish a major undertaking “on budget and on time.” Today Balz is head of planning for the digital marketing firm <a href="http://www.vml.com" target="_blank">VML</a>. John Kenny, PhD’00, studied political science before moving to advertising. As chief strategy officer at <a href="https://fcbchi.com/#/" target="_blank">FCB Chicago</a>, he has examined consumer trends from dieting to beer to frozen pizza. And while changes in beer consumption may not seem to have much in common with mobilizing diasporas in nationalist conflicts—the subject of his UChicago dissertation—he says the mindset is remarkably similar. “One benefit of graduate training was being able to look at familiar phenomena and question traditional approaches to understanding them and finding a newer, maybe more interesting approach,” he explains. “That definitely has been a huge overlap.” Similarly, Skelly’s psychology background helped her as a data scientist. “The research arc of what I do is almost exactly the same,” she says. In both fields, “we start out with a question that’s on a human-relatable level.” A team then works together to tackle the problem through “intensely technical middle ground.” Getting a foot in a company’s door can take time. Skelly recommends developing a robust online presence and attending networking events for industries that seem intriguing.  Kavita Kapadia Matsko, AM’04, PhD’07, received her degree in sociology and now works at the <a href="https://uei.uchicago.edu" target="_blank">Urban Education Institute</a>. Today she’s often on the other side of job searches and regularly meets doctoral students for informational interviews. She says these informal conversations are valuable—and not just because they can expand job seekers’ professional networks. “Having to go through the process of explaining who you are, what you care about, and what you see yourself doing next over and over again is really powerful,” she says. The process helps to “clarify for yourself what it is you’re drawn to and what you want to do.” Looking back on her career path, Skelly wishes she had realized sooner how valuable her expertise was. She advises graduate students not to lose confidence: “You’re so much more talented than you think you are.” For Kenny, “the biggest challenges in the business world—regardless of what area of the business world you go into—are ultimately intellectual challenges. The skills that you’ve developed for tackling the biggest intellectual challenges in academia serve you well for tackling any intellectual issue in the world of business.”</div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/law-policy-society" hreflang="en">Law, Policy &amp; Society</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/careers" hreflang="en">Careers</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/jobs" hreflang="en">Jobs</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refuchicago field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/division-social-sciences" hreflang="en">Division of the Social Sciences</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-relatedlinks field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item">Follow @<a href="http://twitter.com/uchicagossd" target="_blank">UChicagoSSD</a>. Visit the Division of the Social Sciences <a href="https://socialsciences.uchicago.edu" target="_blank">website</a>.   <img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/2016_Winter_Dialogo-cover.png" /><h5>This article appears in the Fall 2015/Winter 2016 issue of <em>Dialogo</em>, the biannual publication for University of Chicago Division of the Social Sciences alumni.</h5> <div class="issue-link"><a href="../dialogo-archive" target="_self">VIEW ALL <em>DIALOGO</em> STORIES</a></div> <div class="issue-link"><a href="http://socialsciences.uchicago.edu/alumni" target="_blank">READ ADDITIONAL SSD NEWS</a></div></div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/law-policy-society/path-more-and-more-traveled" data-a2a-title="The path more and more traveled"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Flaw-policy-society%2Fpath-more-and-more-traveled&amp;title=The%20path%20more%20and%20more%20traveled"></a></span> Wed, 11 Nov 2015 21:03:11 +0000 jmiller 5202 at https://mag.uchicago.edu Career trekking https://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/career-trekking <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/1508_Gibson_Harpers-index.jpg" width="1600" height="743" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/jmiller" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">jmiller</span></span> <span>Tue, 07/21/2015 - 13:57</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>(Photo courtesy Career Advancement)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/lydialyle-gibson"> <a href="/author/lydialyle-gibson"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Lydialyle Gibson</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/university-chicago-magazine" hreflang="en">The University of Chicago Magazine</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item">July–Aug/15</div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Students careers, by the numbers.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>College students who took part in <a href="https://careeradvancement.uchicago.edu" target="_blank">Career Advancement</a>’s careers exploration treks during spring break 2015: <strong>156</strong></p> <p>Number of treks: <strong>10</strong></p> <p>Number of employers visited per trek: <strong>6–9</strong></p> <p>Students who flew to New York for a trek including visits to the <em><a href="http://www.wsj.com" target="_blank">Wall Street Journal</a></em>, the <a href="http://www.guggenheim.org" target="_blank">Guggenheim Museum</a>, and <em><a href="http://thedailyshow.cc.com" target="_blank">The Daily Show with Jon Stewart</a></em>: <strong>16</strong></p> <p>Students who traveled to Seoul, South Korea, or São Paolo and Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, to explore careers in business and banking: <strong>32</strong></p> <p>Students who have taken part in the quarterly treks since they began in 2008: <strong>2,365</strong></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/university-news" hreflang="en">University News</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/jobs" hreflang="en">Jobs</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refuchicago field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/career-advancement" hreflang="en">Career Advancement</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/college-students" hreflang="en">College students</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refformats field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/formats/william-rainey-harpers-index" hreflang="en">William Rainey Harper&#039;s Index</a></div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/career-trekking" data-a2a-title="Career trekking"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Funiversity-news%2Fcareer-trekking&amp;title=Career%20trekking"></a></span> Tue, 21 Jul 2015 18:57:11 +0000 jmiller 4869 at https://mag.uchicago.edu Future perfect https://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/future-perfect <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/1304_Daw_Future-perfect_0.jpg" width="700" height="325" alt="A liberal arts education combined with UChicago’s preprofessional services are “a one-two punch” of career preparation, Daw says." title="A liberal arts education combined with UChicago’s preprofessional services are “a one-two punch” of career preparation, Daw says." typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/rsmith" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">rsmith</span></span> <span>Fri, 03/08/2013 - 09:34</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>A liberal arts education combined with UChicago’s preprofessional services are “a one-two punch” of career preparation, Daw says. (Photo courtesy CAPS)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/meredith-daw"> <a href="/author/meredith-daw"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Meredith Daw</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/university-chicago-magazine" hreflang="en">The University of Chicago Magazine</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item">Mar–Apr/13</div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Career Advancement executive director Meredith Daw discusses the growth in services that assist students in preparing for the future.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I remember the day I first entered Ida Noyes Hall in 2003—it’s hard not to be inspired when stepping into a building with that history. I was joining the office of Career Advising and Planning Services (CAPS). Like its physical home, CAPS had an impressive history of serving the students of the University. Over the past decade, I’ve been part of a large team that has transformed CAPS into a world-class model charged with no less than the future success of each University of Chicago student. This transformation reached a milestone last year when we rebranded our office as <a href="https://careeradvancement.uchicago.edu/" target="_blank">Career Advancement</a>.</p> <p>Our new name reflects the broader mission and deeper student engagement that we now have. During the past year, we worked with more than 4,300 undergraduate students, and we now also invest in supporting students earlier. We’ve launched a new series for first-years called Steps to Success. This class-wide program provides a foundation for career exploration and readiness. Students say they really enjoy the program, and we’ve increased our engagement with first-years from about 25 percent to over 80 percent. We are also connecting earlier with graduate students as more PhDs explore job options outside of the academy.</p> <p>I’m constantly impressed and inspired by our students. The best feeling in the world is when a student I have been working with secures his or her dream internship or job, or is accepted into a graduate or professional school program—and I helped them get there.</p> <p>Career Advancement also provides a rich set of professional development and experiential education opportunities. We now offer nine unique <a href="https://careeradvancement.uchicago.edu/uchicago-careers-in" target="_blank">UChicago Careers in…</a> programs that enable College students to explore education professions, public and social service, health professions, law, business, and other career areas. This past year, we also helped facilitate over 570 Metcalf internships across nine countries and 45 US cities. In response to high student demand, we now offer 29 annual treks to visit employers in places like New York, São Paulo, Silicon Valley, and Singapore, and we’ll be expanding our trek program even further over the next several years. Finally, we provide job shadowing opportunities to help 250 first- and second-year students hone in on their field of interest.</p> <p>None of this would be possible without the extraordinary support we receive from our alumni. It’s an amazing feeling to have a former student contact me and say, “I appreciate everything that your office has done for me, and now I want to give back.” Almost all of our programs are made possible by generous alumni who not only give financially but also give their time and talents to support current students. I really thrive on seeing our students grow, succeed, and give back.</p> <p>Which brings me back to Ida Noyes Hall: completed in 1916, the building was designed to be a social center for women on campus. We want it to be seen now as the center for Career Advancement, where students, staff, and employers engage as a career community. This community is made up of the hundreds of students that we work with individually, the thousands of students that our office serves in some way each year, and the generations of alumni who support us day in and day out. I hope that the next time you visit campus you will stop in Ida Noyes and join us in continuing to grow this Career Advancement community.&ensp;</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/university-news" hreflang="en">University News</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/jobs" hreflang="en">Jobs</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refformats field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/formats/agenda" hreflang="en">On the Agenda</a></div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/future-perfect" data-a2a-title="Future perfect"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Funiversity-news%2Ffuture-perfect&amp;title=Future%20perfect"></a></span> Fri, 08 Mar 2013 15:34:48 +0000 rsmith 1875 at https://mag.uchicago.edu