Reading https://mag.uchicago.edu/tags/reading en Recommended reading https://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/recommended-reading <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/1708_Manhardt_Recommended-reading.jpg" width="725" height="504" alt="Recommended reading" title="Recommended reading" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/jmiller" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">jmiller</span></span> <span>Tue, 08/08/2017 - 13:56</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>(Photography by Michael Vendiola)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/sarah-manhardt-ab17"> <a href="/author/sarah-manhardt-ab17"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Sarah Manhardt, AB’17</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/core" hreflang="en">The Core</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item">Summer/17</div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>For your summer reading list, professors share the books that influenced them the most.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><h3>Matthew Briones</h3> <h4><strong>Associate professor, history</strong></h4> <p>Zora Neale Hurston’s <em>Their Eyes Were Watching God</em> (1937). I read it for historian James Goodman’s 20th Century Race Relations in the United States. He had inserted the Hurston novel into his history course as a lens into the “muck of the Everglades,” showing us the remarkable, historically factual burdens faced by African American women in the postbellum South. I had never read anything like it before—the use of dialect, the proto­feminist arc, and the close near-ethnographic attention to African American culture. So fiction drew me to history.</p> <h3>Daniel Holz</h3> <h4><strong>Associate professor, physics and astronomy &amp; astrophysics</strong></h4> <p><em>Nightfall </em>(1941), by Isaac Asimov. I first read this very short story when I was about 10. It touches on science, sociology, history, religion, and the fate of humankind. It asks what it might be like to have night arrive only once every 2,000 years. Imagine seeing the stars for the very first time and realizing that our solar system might be just one of countless others. The story emphasizes the fragility of civilization and brings home just how profound it can be to look up into the night sky. That feeling of awe has never left me.</p> <h3>William Howell</h3> <h4><strong>Sydney Stein Professor in American Politics</strong></h4> <p>I most enjoy books that grapple with big ideas through careful empirical research. And of late, I’ve found few works more arresting than those written by James Scott. In his 1999 tome, <em>Seeing Like a State</em>, Scott investigates the kinds of information that a state requires and the regimented ways in which it puts this information to use. The book is just brimming with ideas and insights. Two years after having read it, I’m still wrestling with what it says about the politics of surveillance and the pathologies of central planning.</p> <h3>Dennis J. Hutchinson</h3> <h4><strong>Senior lecturer in law and William Rainey Harper Professor in the College</strong></h4> <p>Only 32 pages long, <em>Audubon: A Vision</em> (1969) is the book I return to more than any other. Written by Robert Penn Warren at the height of his powers, the poem is at once lyrical, allegorical, and brutally vivid. The suite of seven sections is nominally the biography of the great naturalist John James Audubon and his explorations in the wilderness where he discovers “How thin is the membrane between himself and the world.” Idealism fades into acceptance of fate, satisfying a deep but unclassifiable longing. The poem ends with a childlike wish that echoes the journey: “In this century, and moment, of mania / Tell me a story. / Make it a story of great distances and starlight. / The name of the story will be Time, But you must not pronounce its name. / Tell me a story of deep delight.”</p> <h3>Peggy Mason</h3> <h4><strong>Professor, neurobiology</strong></h4> <p><em>Bel Canto</em> (2001) by Ann Patchett. This story oozes pathos as a group of people are held hostage. Yet it is dignity and generosity of spirit that emerge as the dominant themes. Rather than crying and wringing their hands, the characters make controlled and deliberate choices that move the reader in the same way as do Rodin’s <em>Burghers of Calais</em>. My feeling of admiration for the characters’ principled actions under extraordinary circumstances is as fresh as it was on the day I finished the book.</p> <h3>Borja Sotomayor</h3> <h4><strong>Senior lecturer, computer science</strong></h4> <p>As far as I can remember, I have always liked computers. Growing up in the ’80s and ’90s without internet access, I had to get by with the few books I could get my hands on in Spain, and had no way to connect with a like-minded community. Going to college didn’t actually help much at first, as I found that most of my classmates were driven not so much by a passion for computing but by the promise of a lucrative career in the tech industry.</p> <p>During my sophomore year I read Steven Levy’s <em>Hackers: Heroes of the Computer Revolution</em> (1984). I was blown away. Levy’s book presented not just the rich history of hacker culture, which gave rise to some of the greatest advances in computing, but also the hacker ethic, a set of values that I had been adhering to already: finding joy in learning, blurring the lines between work and play, and sharing knowledge responsibly and freely. <em>Hackers</em> had a profound impact because it gave me the identity I had been seeking for so long.</p> <h3>Paul Staniland</h3> <h4><strong>Associate professor, political science</strong></h4> <p>Samuel Huntington’s 1968 work, <em>Political Order in Changing Societies</em>. It’s turned out that many of its claims were wrong, and others too vague to be right or wrong. But it brought together in one place the study of political order, revolution, insurgency, counterrevolution, state building, military coups, the politics of the postcolonial world, foreign military interventions, and many other topics that often are studied separately. I remember reading it early in graduate school and thinking, “This—all of it—is exactly what I want to study.” It also insisted that social science is relevant to, and important in, policy debates, even if in controversial or problematic ways. I can still flip through it and find interesting, provocative (sometimes contradictory) ideas popping off the page.</p> <h3>Sara Ray Stoelinga, AB’95, AM’01, PhD’04</h3> <h4><strong>Sara Liston Spurlark Director, Urban Education Institute</strong></h4> <p>One of the books that has had a significant influence on my thinking is <em>So Much Reform, So Little Change </em>(2008) by Charles Payne [Frank P. Hixon Distinguished Service Professor, School of Social Service Administration]. Payne examines urban schools and public school systems and identifies the reasons why school reform initiatives have been unsuccessful. His analysis describes the social, cultural, historical, and structural aspects of urban public schools and the ways reform efforts do not understand, take into account, or work within these realities. Payne provides a clear-eyed depiction of the complex challenges that face urban schools coupled with a sense of hope that recent school reform efforts have identified pathways to improvement.</p> <hr /><p>A version of this article <a href="http://college.uchicago.edu/uniquely-chicago/story/professors-bookshelf-0">originally appeared</a> on the College’s website. See more Uniquely Chicago articles, photos, and videos by student contributors at <a href="http://college.uchicago.edu/archives">college.uchicago.edu/archives</a>.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/university-news" hreflang="en">University News</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/reading" hreflang="en">Reading</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refformats field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/formats/list" hreflang="en">List</a></div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/recommended-reading" data-a2a-title="Recommended reading"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Funiversity-news%2Frecommended-reading&amp;title=Recommended%20reading"></a></span> Tue, 08 Aug 2017 18:56:51 +0000 jmiller 6653 at https://mag.uchicago.edu Releases https://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/releases-25 <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/1705_Gregg_Releases.jpg" width="1600" height="743" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/jmiller" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">jmiller</span></span> <span>Tue, 05/23/2017 - 09:34</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>(Collage by Joy Olivia Miller)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/helen-gregg-ab09"> <a href="/author/helen-gregg-ab09"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Helen Gregg, AB’09</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/university-chicago-magazine" hreflang="en">The University of Chicago Magazine</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item">Spring/17</div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>The <em>Magazine</em> lists a selection of general interest books, films, and albums by alumni. For additional alumni releases, browse the <em>Magazine</em>’s <a href="http://www.goodreads.com/user/show/5471655-university-of-chicago-magazine" target="_blank">Goodreads bookshelf</a>.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><h2><strong>Waking Gods</strong></h2> <h3><strong>Sylvain Neuvel, PhD’03</strong><br /> Author</h3> <p>In Sylvain Neuvel’s sequel to <em>Sleeping Giants</em> (Del Rey, 2016), a team of researchers is working to unravel the mysteries of a towering robot buried on Earth thousands of years previously, when a second robot appears. And a third, and then a whole army. A war breaks out for control of the planet, and the researchers’ discoveries become humanity’s last line of defense against a complete takeover.</p> <h2><strong>Minor Characters Have Their Day: Genre and the Contemporary Literary Marketplace</strong></h2> <h3><strong>Jeremy Rosen, AM’04, PhD’11</strong><br /> Author</h3> <p>The trend started in the late 1960s with works like <em>Wide Sargasso Sea</em> and <em>Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead</em>, and now authors from Geraldine Brooks (<em>March</em>) to Margaret Atwood (<em>The Penelopiad</em>) have published books that retell classic literature from another character’s perspective. University of Utah assistant professor Jeremy Rosen investigates the new genre of “minor character elaboration” and argues it reflects both a neoliberal emphasis on individual experience and publishers’ desire to market new novels to great books readers.</p> <h2><strong>The Working Class Republican: Ronald Reagan and the Return of Blue-Collar Conservatism</strong></h2> <h3><strong>Henry Olsen, JD’90</strong><br /> Author</h3> <p>Republican icon Ronald Reagan is the true heir of Democratic hero Franklin Delano Roosevelt, argues Ethics and Public Policy Center senior fellow Henry Olsen—both presidents focused on providing working-class Americans the economic security and dignity of a steady job. Conservatives have been making gains over the past three decades by embracing this New Deal populism, posits Olsen, and should continue to promote the vision that Roosevelt and Reagan shared.</p> <h2><strong>Fallout</strong></h2> <h3><strong>Sara Paretsky, AM’69, MBA’77, PhD’77</strong><br /> Author</h3> <p>In Sara Paretsky’s latest V. I. Warshawski mystery, a film student goes missing in a Kansas college town. Warshawski’s investigation draws her into the racial tensions that have long plagued the area, and that may hold clues to the disappearance.</p> <h2><strong>The Great Rescue: American Heroes, an Iconic Ship, and Saving Europe During World War I</strong></h2> <h3><strong>Peter Hernon, AM’72</strong><br /> Author</h3> <p>When the United States entered World War I in 1917, the US Navy seized a German luxury ocean liner from New York Harbor, renamed it the USS <em>Leviathan</em>, and used it to ferry American soldiers to fronts in France. On the centennial of America joining the fight, journalist Peter Hernon uses the ship and its array of passengers—generals and reporters, nurses and a future president—to offer a unique history of the Great War.</p> <h2><strong>Blast the Sugar Out! Lower Blood Sugar, Lose Weight, Live Better</strong></h2> <h3><strong>Ian K. Smith, MD’97</strong><br /> Author</h3> <p>The author of the best-selling Shred<em> </em>nutrition series, physician and media personality Ian K. Smith offers a new five-week plan for reducing sugar consumption with the goals of both losing weight and improving overall health. Providing simple low-sugar substitutions, exercise ideas, and more than 45 recipes, <em>Blast the Sugar Out! </em>aims to help readers eat, and love, healthy foods.</p> <h2><strong>Late in the Empire of Men</strong></h2> <h3><strong>Christopher Kempf, AM’16</strong><br /> Author</h3> <p>In his debut poetry collection, Christopher Kempf uses his own coming of age in Ohio and California to explore the United States’ larger history of westward expansion and colonialism. Through imagery and reappropriated rhetoric, Kempf explores how American culture shapes and confines young men.</p> <h2><strong>The Sensational Past: How the Enlightenment Changed the Way We Use Our Senses</strong></h2> <h3><strong>Carolyn Purnell, AM’07, PhD’13</strong><br /> Author</h3> <p>Enlightenment thinkers, seeking to make sense of their world, employed sight, sound, touch, taste, and smell in ways that seem shocking today—blindfolded children, intentional addictions, pianos made of live cats. Historian Carolyn Purnell delves into this often-bizarre history of sensation and shows how Enlightenment-era sensory experiments continue to shape the way people experience life three centuries later.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/university-news" hreflang="en">University News</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/books" hreflang="en">Books</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/reading" hreflang="en">Reading</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refformats field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/formats/releases" hreflang="en">Releases</a></div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/releases-25" data-a2a-title="Releases"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Funiversity-news%2Freleases-25&amp;title=Releases"></a></span> Tue, 23 May 2017 14:34:27 +0000 jmiller 6474 at https://mag.uchicago.edu Releases https://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/releases-22 <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/1608_Gregg_Releases.jpg" width="1600" height="743" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/jmiller" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">jmiller</span></span> <span>Mon, 07/25/2016 - 16:06</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>(Covers collage by Joy Olivia Miller)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/helen-gregg-ab09"> <a href="/author/helen-gregg-ab09"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Helen Gregg, AB’09</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/university-chicago-magazine" hreflang="en">The University of Chicago Magazine</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item">Summer/16</div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>The <em>Magazine</em> lists a selection of general interest books, films, and albums by alumni. For additional alumni releases, browse the <em>Magazine</em>’s&nbsp;<a href="http://www.goodreads.com/user/show/5471655-university-of-chicago-magazine" target="_blank">Goodreads bookshelf</a>.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><h2><strong><a href="https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/1708917635" target="_blank">Listen, Liberal; Or, What Ever Happened to the Party of the People?</a></strong></h2> <h3><strong>Thomas Frank, AM’89, PhD’94</strong><br /> Author</h3> <p>A Democrat has occupied the White House for 16 of the past 24 years. So why hasn’t the party of Andrew Jackson’s populism and Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal done more to help the working class? To Thomas Frank, founding editor of the <em>Baffler</em>, the problem goes beyond campaign finance laws and political opposition. He argues that the Democratic Party has shifted its commitment from the average American to the corporate, cultural, and intellectual elite, allowing economic inequality to grow largely unchecked.</p> <h2><strong><a href="https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/1708918777" target="_blank">Frozen in Time: Twenty Stories</a></strong></h2> <h3><strong>Joseph Epstein, AB’59</strong><br /> Author</h3> <p>Many of the works in writer, critic, and National Humanities Medal winner Joseph Epstein’s new story collection are set in his hometown of Chicago. From the struggles of a son who receives an early inheritance in “Remittance Man” to the follies of older men who pursue younger women in “The Viagra Triangle,” the tales chronicle love, aging, and the intricacies of urban life.</p> <h2><strong><a href="https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/1708919344" target="_blank">Ghetto: The Invention of a Place, the History of an Idea</a></strong></h2> <h3><strong>Mitchell Duneier, AM’85, PhD’92</strong><br /> Author</h3> <p>The term ‘ghetto’ has been around since 1516, when the Venetian government ordered its Jewish residents into a quartered-off section of the city. For much of its 500-year history the word has been used to describe Jewish-inhabited areas of forced separation—a history that helps clarify the word’s current use and the confluence of race, place, and poverty in America, asserts Princeton sociologist Mitchell Duneier. Focusing on ghettos past and present, Duneier shows how the word and its changing meaning have shaped public policy.</p> <h2><strong><a href="https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/1593050400" target="_blank">Governing Behavior: How Nerve Cell Dictatorships and Democracies Control Everything We Do</a></strong></h2> <h3><strong>Ari Berkowitz, AB’84</strong><br /> Author</h3> <p>Nervous systems control all animal behavior, but not all systems govern in the same way. Some have “dictator” neurons that send down orders, while some make decisions democratically with input from many neurons, explains University of Oklahoma biology professor Ari Berkowitz. In this accessible overview, Berkowitz explores the evolution of these different systems and how they can coexist within a single animal.</p> <h2><strong><a href="https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/1708921651" target="_blank">The Golden Condom: And Other Essays on Love Lost and Found</a></strong></h2> <h3><strong>Jeanne Safer, AB’69</strong><br /> Author</h3> <p>Unrequited love, unhealthy friendships, traumatic breakups—we’ve all been there. In 12 essays psychotherapist Jeanne Safer shares her own relationship experiences and memorable anecdotes from other people in her life, including her patients. The collection shows how universal stories like these are, and how entertaining, and liberating, they can be.</p> <h2><strong><a href="https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/1708922177" target="_blank">Listen to Me</a></strong></h2> <h3><strong>Hannah Pittard, AB’01</strong><br /> Author</h3> <p>In Hannah Pittard’s third novel, Mark and Maggie are setting out on their annual road trip, shortly after Maggie was mugged at gunpoint and long after their marriage first began to unravel. A fierce storm and chilling encounters with strangers along the way add to the tumult, and the couple is eventually forced to spend the night at a remote, powerless inn. There Maggie’s paranoia starts to spin out of control, until another tragic situation allows her to step back into the driver’s seat.</p> <h2><strong><a href="https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/1708922795" target="_blank">Greetings from Utopia Park: Surviving a Transcendent Childhood</a></strong></h2> <h3><strong>Claire Hoffman, AM’05</strong><br /> Author</h3> <p>When Claire Hoffman is five, her mother moves her and her brother to Heaven on Earth, the Iowa headquarters of the Maharishi Mahesh Yogi and his Transcendental Meditation movement. The early years are magical, but as Claire grows up she becomes increasingly skeptical of Maharishi and the costs of enlightenment, and flees to her father in California. This memoir chronicles Hoffman’s upbringing and how, years later, she returns to the Iowa community to recapture a bit of enlightenment on her own terms.</p> <h2><strong><a href="https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/1708924085" target="_blank">The Fractured Republic: Renewing America’s Social Contract in the Age of Individualism</a></strong></h2> <h3><strong>Yuval Levin, AM’02, PhD’10</strong><br /> Author</h3> <p>Nostalgia for simpler, more unified times on both sides of the aisle have left America’s two major political parties out of touch with how the country has diversified over the past half-century, argues Yuval Levin. The founder and editor of <em>National Affairs</em>, Levin advocates for embracing this splintering and allowing individual groups and communities to design policies that work for them.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/university-news" hreflang="en">University News</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/books" hreflang="en">Books</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/reading" hreflang="en">Reading</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refformats field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/formats/releases" hreflang="en">Releases</a></div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/releases-22" data-a2a-title="Releases"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Funiversity-news%2Freleases-22&amp;title=Releases"></a></span> Mon, 25 Jul 2016 21:06:06 +0000 jmiller 5868 at https://mag.uchicago.edu Life through fiction https://mag.uchicago.edu/arts-humanities/life-through-fiction <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/1605_Gregg_Life-through-fiction.jpg" width="1600" height="743" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/jmiller" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">jmiller</span></span> <span>Wed, 05/11/2016 - 10:44</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Kalisha Buckhanon is the author of <em>Solemn</em> (St. Martin’s Press, 2016). (Photography by DeJohn Barnes)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/helen-gregg-ab09"> <a href="/author/helen-gregg-ab09"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Helen Gregg, AB’09</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/web-exclusives" hreflang="en">Web exclusives</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item">05.11.2016</div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Author Kalisha Buckhanon, AB’99, AM’07, discusses the power of storytelling, Trayvon Martin, and how professor William Veeder changed her life. </p> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Author <a href="http://www.kalisha.com" target="_blank">Kalisha Buckhanon</a>’s (AB’99, AM’07) latest book, <a href="http://www.kalisha.com/books/solemn/" target="_blank"><em>Solemn</em></a>, completes a trilogy on black American youth that began with <a href="http://www.kalisha.com/books/upstate/" target="_blank"><em>Upstate</em></a> (St. Martin’s Griffin, 2005). She discussed the books and her influences, literary and otherwise, with the <em>Magazine</em>. Her responses have been edited and condensed.</p> <h2><sh2>Why did you choose to focus on the lives of young people in novels ostensibly for adults? </sh2></h2> <p><sh2>My first novel was my MFA thesis at the <a href="http://www.newschool.edu" target="_blank">New School in New York City</a>. I was teaching a lot and was around kids all the time. Their voices were immediate in my head in the middle of the night when I wrote. My thesis adviser was the novelist <a href="http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/5021508.Sapphire" target="_blank">Sapphire</a>, and she urged me to stop collecting my stories for a thesis but to continue on with what I called a “little thing” about two kids from Harlem writing letters. Once Sapphire took the pages to a friend who was an agent, they sold in an auction I still do not understand. I never thought anybody would read some love letters and notes between two black kids. The challenges African American adults face carry more emotional push for me considering their trickle-down effects on children, who have little choice in circumstances. Books for young people are often not complicated enough for me, but that does not bar me from writing complicated books about young people.</sh2></p> <sh2><h2><em>Upstate</em> was published years before the spate of high-profile shootings of black youth that helped spark Black Lives Matter. Did this emerging national dialogue and newfound attention affect the plot and development of<em> Solemn</em>?</h2> <img align="right" src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/1605_Gregg_Life-through-fiction_spotA.jpg" />I started <em>Solemn</em> when I was assisting at a preschool near campus. I came in one day shortly before my 35th birthday, and the talk was about some man in Florida who shot a black boy without being arrested for it. It was not anger, but disgust. I was arrested by Trayvon Martin’s loss because he reminded me of my little brother, who is in his mid-20s: same height, build; childish Facebook posts and interests. We all took it personally for our own reasons, and that was mine. I was scared, heartbroken. I watched his family handle that, and through it all I could see how closely they looked like me or my relatives. I am glad you pointed out these shootings were “high-profile,” because it has always been going on. Only it finally crested into international focus. Prior to this moment, all my books and writing had these concerns. I have tried to just be a “writer,” but I could not leave oppression out of the narratives because we can’t leave it out of our lives. It was only natural for me that <em>Solemn</em> would twist around this stuff. However, to see what I was trying to capture with <em>Upstate</em> 10 years ago play out in real life before my eyes made <em>Solemn</em> richer. <h2>What do you hope readers take away from <em>Solemn</em>?</h2> I appreciate people for coming along with me deeply into a young, black, trailer-park girl’s psyche, mind, spirit, and soul. She’s not glamorous or famous. She wants to be. She does not have any juicy love affairs or girlfriend gossip to give. She’s a victim of them. She’s not scaling buildings. She wants to, like all kids with an imagination do. I had never read a novel about a young black girl living in a trailer park, and I wanted to. I want people to treat her like a character no one has ever thought too much about before, but should. She has a story. She was here. There are many more where Solemn’s came from. <h2>What benefits does fiction have over nonfiction to address social issues?</h2> Fiction can live. The stories can live well past the moment and teach people much later in the future what life was at a certain moment in time for certain people. Nonfiction, besides some of the most powerful treatises or legal decisions that changed the states of the world, or anointed essayists like [James] Baldwin and [Joan] Didion, is ephemeral. It moves with the times, and time moves very fast. So it must be much more aggressive in its address. Fiction can relax, because we have novels like <em>The Bluest Eye</em> and <em>Their Eyes Were Watching God</em> that leap through time. And more people will trust and enjoy fiction than will read my blogs or essays. People love people, even if they are imaginary. And we will love people even when those people are showing us society’s ills or flaws in man. If I said the things I was really thinking when I wrote the fiction, no one would listen. But I just stood and read from <em>Solemn</em> for the first time at a salon in Brooklyn where I was the only black person there, and I read sentences about the nosy white people and the rich white boys who get off for everything. This was no essay, but characters in their own world and a narrator sharing their thoughts on it. And it was relaxed and trusted. I was not an angry black woman. That’s fiction. <h2>Who are some of your literary inspirations?</h2> I have too many favorite writers. I find new inspirations all the time. Not all of them are novelists. I was recently blown away by Elizabeth Kolbert’s <em>The Sixth Extinction</em> (Henry Holt and Company, 2014) and Sonali Deraniyagala’s memoir <em>Wave </em>(Vintage, 2013). I just read a few mysteries from my fellow Sisters in Crime, a business league of women suspense writers founded by <a href="http://www.chicagobooth.edu/magazine/winter-2016/features/the-page-turner" target="_blank">Sara Paretsky</a>, AM’69, MBA’77, PhD’77. <h2>How did UChicago influence you and your writing?</h2> I would not be a writer without the University of Chicago. I would not have had the courage or belief. I was given my number one favorite book ever of all times, <em>Sula</em> by Toni Morrison, in a Fiction of Three Americas class taught by William Veeder when I was a junior. That book was the tipping point for me to say I could throw together the craziness and idiosyncrasies of people as I knew them into a book. The <a href="http://college.uchicago.edu" target="_blank">College</a> was the most powerful experience and time of my life. I do not know too many places, even historically black colleges, where a little bookworm from Kankakee, Illinois, can wind up hosting or shaking hands with the likes of Octavia Butler, Angela Davis, Gwendolyn Brooks, Sonia Sanchez, Toni Morrison, Elizabeth Alexander, Derek Walcott, and John Edgar Wideman while dreaming of being a writer herself. That’s miraculous. The downside of being a U of C grad is my expectations of books are very, very high. I know their worth. I work long and hard, too long and hard I think, out of worry to measure up. <h2>What are you working on now?</h2> I am pruning and decorating a new novel I finished this past winter, <em>Speaking of Summer</em>. I have a play I first began 10 years ago at Chicago’s South Side <a href="http://www.etacreativearts.org" target="_blank">eta Creative Arts</a> Foundation’s playwriting workshop: <em>Conjugal Visits</em>. I am just now returning to it full force. I have a short story series on <a href="http://mag.uchicago.edu/arts-humanities/craft-singles" target="_self">Amazon Kindle Singles</a>, about a mixed-race couple in Hyde Park who want to adopt a black child. It is called “Pick Me.” I want to start another novel that’s been in my head for a while called “Choke Chains.” <a href="http://www.oxfordamerican.org" target="_blank"><em>Oxford American</em></a> will publish some of it as flash fiction in its June issue.</sh2></div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/arts-humanities" hreflang="en">Arts &amp; Humanities</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/books" hreflang="en">Books</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/reading" hreflang="en">Reading</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/creative-process" hreflang="en">Creative process</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/race" hreflang="en">Race</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refuchicago field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/college-alumni" hreflang="en">College alumni</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/college" hreflang="en">The College</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refformats field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/formats/interview" hreflang="en">Interview</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-relatedstories field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>“<a href="http://mag.uchicago.edu/arts-humanities/acts-union" target="_self">Acts of Union</a>” (<em>University of Chicago Magazine</em>, web exclusives, 02.11.2015) “<a href="http://mag.uchicago.edu/arts-humanities/novel-talent" target="_self">Novel Talent</a>” (<em>University of Chicago Magazine</em>, Nov–Dec/14) “<a href="http://thecore.uchicago.edu/Summer2013/departments/running-narrative.shtml" target="_blank">Running Narrative</a>” (<em>The Core</em>, Summer/13) “<a href="http://thecore.uchicago.edu/Winter2012/departments/BTQ-double-agents.shtml" target="_blank">Double Agents</a>” (<em>The Core</em>, Winter/12) “<a href="http://magazine.uchicago.edu/0912/arts_sciences/agents.shtml" target="_blank">Literary Agents</a>” (<em>University of Chicago Magazine</em>, Nov–Dec/09) “<a href="http://magazine.uchicago.edu/0904/arts_sciences/printbyhand.shtml" target="_blank">Printed by Hand</a>” (<em>University of Chicago Magazine</em>, Mar–Apr/09)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-relatedlinks field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Visit Kalisha Buckhanon’s <a href="http://www.kalisha.com" target="_blank">website</a>.</p> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/arts-humanities/life-through-fiction" data-a2a-title="Life through fiction"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Farts-humanities%2Flife-through-fiction&amp;title=Life%20through%20fiction"></a></span> Wed, 11 May 2016 15:44:04 +0000 jmiller 5640 at https://mag.uchicago.edu Releases https://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/releases-21 <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/1605_Gregg_Releases.jpg" width="1600" height="743" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Anonymous</span></span> <span>Fri, 04/29/2016 - 11:45</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>(Covers collage by Helen Gregg, AB’09)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/helen-gregg-ab09"> <a href="/author/helen-gregg-ab09"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Helen Gregg, AB’09</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/university-chicago-magazine" hreflang="en">The University of Chicago Magazine</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item">Spring/16</div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>The <em>Magazine</em> lists a selection of general interest books, films, and albums by alumni. For additional alumni releases, browse the <em>Magazine</em>’s&nbsp;<a href="http://www.goodreads.com/user/show/5471655-university-of-chicago-magazine" target="_blank">Goodreads bookshelf</a>.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><h2><strong><a href="https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/1641748465" target="_blank">Solemn</a></strong></h2> <h3><strong>Kalisha Buckhanon, AB’99, AM’07</strong><br /> Author</h3> <p>In the final novel in Kalisha Buckhanon’s trilogy on black American life, Solemn Redvine senses that a baby in her rural Mississippi trailer park may be her half sibling. After seeing the baby dropped down a community well, Solemn is thrown into chaos that only deepens when the baby’s mother disappears, a crime the local police force is reluctant to investigate. In this lyrical, haunting coming-of-age story, Solemn struggles to find identity and a way forward in the face of poverty and disenfranchisement.</p> <p>For more, read our <a href="http://mag.uchicago.edu/arts-humanities/life-through-fiction" target="_self">interview with Buckhanon</a>.</p> <h2><strong><a href="https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/1641752109" target="_blank">The Defender: How the Legendary Black Newspaper Changed America</a></strong></h2> <h3><strong>Ethan Michaeli, AB’89</strong><br /> Author</h3> <p>Founded in 1905, the <em>Defender</em> newspaper in Chicago has become an influential publication for generations of African Americans thanks to its unflinching coverage of racial justice issues and columns by prominent black thinkers. Former <em>Defender</em> reporter Ethan Michaeli chronicles the paper’s past and the way it has shaped American history, from encouraging the Great Migration to galvanizing civil rights activists to helping elect presidents from John F. Kennedy to Barack Obama.</p> <p>For more, read an <a href="http://mag.uchicago.edu/law-policy-society/how-get-newspaper-job-english-degree-and-mononucleosis" target="_self">excerpt from the <em>Defender</em></a>.</p> <h2><strong><a href="https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/1641767592" target="_blank">City of Thorns: Nine Lives in the World’s Largest Refugee Camp</a></strong></h2> <h3><strong>Ben Rawlence, AM’99</strong><br /> Author</h3> <p>Ben Rawlence first visited Dadaab, a Kenyan refugee camp near the Somalian border, as a Human Rights Watch researcher in 2010. Over the course of four years and seven long visits, he saw the camp’s population swell to half a million people and witnessed the violence, destitution, and hopelessness in which they live. Through the stories of nine of the refugees, Rawlence examines the sociopolitical forces that keep them trapped at Dadaab and puts individual faces on a humanitarian crisis.</p> <h2><strong><a href="https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/1641770654" target="_blank">Markets of Provence: Food, Antiques, Crafts, and More</a></strong></h2> <h3><strong>Marjorie R. Williams, AB’80</strong><br /> Author</h3> <p>Markets have been a part of life in Provence, France, since the Middle Ages. Food and travel writer Marjorie R. Williams highlights 30 of the region’s markets in a pocket-sized guide. Including color-coded maps, browsing and payment etiquette, and key French phrases, the guide provides information both necessary and enriching for a Provençal shopping experience.</p> <h2><strong><a href="https://www.facebook.com/haroularose/info/?tab=page_info" target="_blank">Here the Blue River</a></strong></h2> <h3><strong>Haroula Rose (Spyropoulos)</strong><br /> Singer-songwriter</h3> <p>Folk singer/songwriter Haroula Rose’s second LP, named after a line in a Ralph Waldo Emerson poem, features layered, flowing melodies and plenty of storytelling. Many songs pay homage to her literary influences, from Pablo Neruda to Bonnie Jo Campbell, AB’84.</p> <h2><strong><a href="https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/1641776082" target="_blank">Emmett Till in Different States: Poems</a></strong></h2> <h3><strong>Philip C. Kolin, AM’67</strong><br /> Author</h3> <p>In 1955 14-year-old Emmett Till was lynched in Mississippi for reportedly flirting with a white woman. Poet and University of Southern Mississippi professor emeritus Philip C. Kolin’s latest collection reflects on more than seven decades of race relations in America through the evolving, still-resonant legacy of Till’s murder.</p> <h2><strong><a href="https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/1641778082" target="_blank">Heroines of Mercy Street: The Real Nurses of the Civil War</a></strong></h2> <h3><strong>Pamela Toler, AM’81, PhD’03</strong><br /> Author</h3> <p>In this companion book to the PBS drama series <em>Mercy Street</em>, history writer Pamela Toler tells the stories of several real-life nurses who worked at a makeshift Union hospital in Virginia during the Civil War. Toler draws on diaries, letters, and memoirs to show how overwhelming casualties on both sides of the war turned the Madison House nurses into fierce patient advocates, marking a new era in American medicine.</p> <h2><strong><a href="http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/25673927-hair" target="_blank">Hair: A Human History</a></strong></h2> <h3><strong>Kurt Stenn, LAB’57, SB’61</strong><br /> Author</h3> <p>Hair complements our fashion trends, is found in musical instruments, aids in forensic science—and has become part of our identity. Follicle expert Kurt Stenn, former director of skin biology at Johnson and Johnson, explores many biological, cultural, and anthropological strands of hair and its history, including the science behind relaxers and dyes, the role of hair shirts in medieval religion, the art of wig making, the use of hair in commercial products from brushes to tennis balls, and more.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/university-news" hreflang="en">University News</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/books" hreflang="en">Books</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/reading" hreflang="en">Reading</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refformats field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/formats/releases" hreflang="en">Releases</a></div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/releases-21" data-a2a-title="Releases"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Funiversity-news%2Freleases-21&amp;title=Releases"></a></span> Fri, 29 Apr 2016 16:45:04 +0000 Anonymous 5603 at https://mag.uchicago.edu Releases https://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/releases-20 <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/1602_Gregg_Releases.jpg" width="1600" height="743" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Anonymous</span></span> <span>Tue, 02/09/2016 - 11:33</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>(Collage by Joy Olivia Miller)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/helen-gregg-ab09"> <a href="/author/helen-gregg-ab09"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Helen Gregg, AB’09</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/university-chicago-magazine" hreflang="en">The University of Chicago Magazine</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item">Winter/16</div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>The <em>Magazine</em> lists a selection of general interest books, films, and albums by alumni. For additional alumni releases, browse the <em>Magazine</em>’s <a href="http://www.goodreads.com/user/show/5471655-university-of-chicago-magazine" target="_blank">Goodreads bookshelf</a>.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><h2><strong><a href="https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/1400792493" target="_blank">The Autobiography of James T. Kirk: The Story of Starfleet’s Greatest Captain</a></strong></h2> <h3><strong>David A. Goodman, AB’84</strong><br /> Author</h3> <p><em>Star Trek: Enterprise</em> writer David A. Goodman presents an in-world memoir of one of the show’s most famous characters, chronicling Captain Kirk’s life from his childhood on Tarsus IV to his rise to the helm of the <em>Enterprise</em>. By filling in Kirk’s backstory and including snippets of his personal correspondence and captain’s logs, Goodman presents a detailed, nuanced portrait of the Starfleet captain.</p> <h2><strong><a href="https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/1567837411" target="_blank">Sisters in Law: How Sandra Day O’Connor and Ruth Bader Ginsburg Went to the Supreme Court and Changed the World</a></strong></h2> <h3><strong>Linda Hirshman, JD’69</strong><br /> Author</h3> <p>As the first and second women appointed to the nation’s highest court, justices Sandra Day O’Connor and Ruth Bader Ginsburg overcame political and cultural differences to forge a strong friendship and worked together to promote women’s equality. Attorney and historian Linda Hirshman chronicles the distinct paths that O’Connor and Ginsburg traveled to the Supreme Court and how they changed America’s legal and cultural landscape.</p> <h2><strong><a href="https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/1567838447">The Typewriter Revolution: A Typist’s Companion for the 21st Century</a></strong></h2> <h3><strong>Richard Polt, AM’89, PhD’91</strong><br /> Author</h3> <p>From typewritten blogs to letter-writing socials to street poetry, the typewriter is enjoying a 21st-century revival. Xavier University philosophy professor and typewriter enthusiast Richard Polt chronicles the machine’s resurgence and provides practical information on how to select and care for a typewriter. Fully illustrated with vintage photographs, postcards, and manuals, <em>The Typewriter Revolution</em> is both a how-to and an inspiration for those who want to return to a world of carriage returns.</p> <h2><strong><a href="https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/1567844639" target="_blank">Privilege and Prejudice: The Life of a Black Pioneer</a></strong></h2> <h3><strong>Clifton R. Wharton, AM’56, PhD’58</strong><br /> Author</h3> <p>In 1958 Clifton R. Wharton became the first African American to receive a PhD in economics from the University of Chicago. His memoir details a trailblazing life—as the first black president of a major US university and the first black CEO of a Fortune 500 company, and as deputy secretary of state under president Bill Clinton—as well as the obstacles he faced along the way, including negative stereotypes and low expectations.</p> <h2><strong><a href="https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/1567846811" target="_blank">Consent</a></strong></h2> <h3><strong>Nancy Ohlin, AB’83</strong><br /> Author</h3> <p>In Nancy Ohlin’s third novel for young adults, high school piano prodigy Bea falls for her music teacher, Dane. He encourages Bea to apply to Juilliard, and their relationship becomes intimate after a campus visit in New York. An unflinching look at a student-teacher relationship and its repercussions, Consent explores issues surrounding love and morality.</p> <h2><strong><a href="https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/1567847649">The Shift: One Nurse, Twelve Hours, Four Patients’ Lives</a></strong></h2> <h3><strong>Theresa Brown, AB’87, PhD’94</strong><br /> Author</h3> <p>Practicing nurse and <em>New York Times</em> contributor Theresa Brown offers an honest, detailed account of a typical shift in the oncology ward of a teaching hospital. Her descriptions of caring for four very different patients showcase the skill, sensitivity, and sense of humor that nursing requires and illuminate the dysfunction of the modern health care industry.</p> <h2><strong><a href="https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/1567849008" target="_blank">$2.00 a Day: Living on Almost Nothing in America</a></strong></h2> <h3><strong>Kathryn Edin and H. Luke Shaefer, AM’05, PhD’08</strong><br /> Coauthors</h3> <p>About 1.5 million US families live on less than $2.00 per day, per person. Edin and University of Michigan associate professor and census data expert H. Luke Shaefer profile some of these Americans who have virtually no income, showing how welfare reform and an increasingly competitive and unpredictable low-wage labor market have quietly left millions destitute, and describing what these families have to do to survive.</p> <h2><strong><a href="https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/1567850530" target="_blank">The City at Three P.M.: Writing, Reading, and Traveling</a></strong></h2> <h3><strong>Peter LaSalle, AM’72</strong><br /> Author</h3> <p>Fiction writer Peter LaSalle has walked around the UChicago campus with Saul Bellow, EX’39; followed Gustave Flaubert’s footsteps through Carthage; and sat in Jorge Luis Borges’s preferred spot in a Buenos Aires library. In 11 personal essays, LaSalle shares stories from his bookish travels and meditates on the life of a writer and the power of literature.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/university-news" hreflang="en">University News</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/books" hreflang="en">Books</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/reading" hreflang="en">Reading</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refformats field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/formats/releases" hreflang="en">Releases</a></div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/releases-20" data-a2a-title="Releases"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Funiversity-news%2Freleases-20&amp;title=Releases"></a></span> Tue, 09 Feb 2016 17:33:51 +0000 Anonymous 5441 at https://mag.uchicago.edu Releases https://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/releases-19 <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/1511_Gregg_Releases.jpg" width="1600" height="743" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/jmiller" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">jmiller</span></span> <span>Sun, 11/22/2015 - 15:18</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>(Collage by Joy Olivia Miller)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/helen-gregg-ab09"> <a href="/author/helen-gregg-ab09"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Helen Gregg, AB’09</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/university-chicago-magazine" hreflang="en">The University of Chicago Magazine</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item">Fall/15</div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>The <em>Magazine</em> lists a selection of general interest books, films, and albums by alumni. For additional alumni releases, browse the <em>Magazine</em>’s <a href="http://www.goodreads.com/user/show/5471655-university-of-chicago-magazine" target="_blank">Goodreads bookshelf</a>.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><h2><strong><a href="https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/1415748496" target="_blank">Reading Claudius: A Memoir in Two Parts</a></strong></h2> <h3><strong>Caroline Heller, AB’72</strong><br /> Author</h3> <p>Caroline Heller’s mother, Liese, had fallen for Erich Heller while studying in prewar Prague, but Erich’s brother, Paul, remained in love with Liese even during the six years he spent in concentration camps. Paul and Liese were later reunited and married in the United States, where their daughter, Caroline, grew up with the ghost of her parents’ past. In <em>Reading Claudius</em>, she combines their story with her own and shows how two generations found solace and strength in literature.</p> <h2><strong><a href="https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/1437979398" target="_blank">The Senator Next Door: A Memoir From the Heartland</a></strong></h2> <h3><strong>Amy Klobuchar, JD’85</strong><br /> Author</h3> <p>In 2006 Amy Klobuchar became the first woman elected to the US Senate from Minnesota. This frank memoir chronicles her life thus far and shows how the challenges she’s faced, from her father’s struggles with alcoholism to tough battles in Congress, have molded her into a determined politician with an unshakable faith in our government. Political courage, she believes, is “stand[ing] next to someone you don’t agree with for the betterment of this country.”</p> <h2><strong><a href="https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/1437978369" target="_blank">Out on the Wire: The Storytelling Secrets of the New Masters of Radio</a></strong></h2> <h3><strong>Jessica Abel, AB’91</strong><br /> Author</h3> <p>Cartoonist and writer Jessica Abel’s graphic novel takes readers behind the scenes of seven popular narrative radio shows and podcasts. With a foreword by <em>This American Life</em>’s Ira Glass and plenty of insider anecdotes, Abel illustrates how shows like <em>Serial</em>, <em>Planet Money</em>, <em>Snap Judgment</em>, and <em>RadioLab</em> find and construct compelling stories that engage growing audiences.</p> <h2><strong><a href="https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/1437990957" target="_blank">Swedish Design: An Ethnography</a></strong></h2> <h3><strong>Keith M. Murphy, AB’99</strong><br /> Author</h3> <p>Furniture and household goods manufacturers like Ikea have spread iconic Swedish design around the world. But the simple, functional style is about more than aesthetics. Since the 19th century, Swedish politicians and social planners have used design to promote egalitarianism, responsibility, and other social democratic values. With an anthropological focus, University of California, Irvine, associate professor Keith M. Murphy investigates the political and social power of design in Sweden.</p> <h2><a href="https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/1437993908" target="_blank">Contraband: Smuggling and the Birth of the American Century</a></h2> <h3><strong>Andrew Wender Cohen, AM’92, PhD’99</strong><br /> Author</h3> <p>Smuggling tested Americans’ patriotism in the 18th and 19th centuries, tempting citizens to dodge protectionist tariffs to procure foreign luxuries. Focusing on the Gilded Age, Syracuse University associate professor Andrew Wender Cohen uses the history of smuggling in America to illuminate larger ideas about US economics, culture, and power.</p> <h2><strong><a href="https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/1437999143" target="_blank">Street Poison: The Biography of Iceberg Slim</a></strong></h2> <h3><strong>Justin Gifford, AM’99</strong><br /> Author</h3> <p>In 1967, after decades as a pimp and criminal, Robert Beck released a gritty memoir, <em>Pimp</em>, that launched him as one of the best-selling and most influential black writers of the 20th century. University of Nevada associate professor Justin Gifford presents a nuanced biography of the man known as Iceberg Slim, from his life on the streets to his subversive writing to his wider impact on “street,” and American, culture.</p> <h2><strong><a href="https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/1437997244" target="_blank">Revolution: Mapping the Road to American Independence, 1755-1783</a></strong></h2> <h3><strong>Richard H. Brown and Paul E. Cohen, AM’75</strong><br /> Coauthors</h3> <p>Rare book dealer Paul Cohen helps provide a cartographical account of the American Revolution, using historical maps and drawings to illustrate how, and where, the conflict unfolded. From maps of land claims in North America before the war to a battlefield diagram of Yorktown, the 60 images and accompanying essays in <em>Revolution </em>provide a fresh perspective on America’s beginnings.</p> <h2><strong><a href="https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/1437996167" target="_blank">Mothers, Tell Your Daughters</a></strong></h2> <h3><strong>Bonnie Jo Campbell, AB’84</strong><br /> Author</h3> <p>The female protagonists in Bonnie Jo Campbell’s latest collection of short stories inhabit a brutal rural American landscape, full of traumatic pasts and limited dreams. From an abused wife who takes revenge on her bedridden husband to a mother searching for a warm home for her family, the women are flawed but strong, fighting for the best lives they can get.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/university-news" hreflang="en">University News</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/books" hreflang="en">Books</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/reading" hreflang="en">Reading</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refformats field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/formats/releases" hreflang="en">Releases</a></div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/releases-19" data-a2a-title="Releases"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Funiversity-news%2Freleases-19&amp;title=Releases"></a></span> Sun, 22 Nov 2015 21:18:39 +0000 jmiller 5235 at https://mag.uchicago.edu Five things you didn’t know about John Boyer and UChicago history https://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/five-things-you-didnt-know-about-john-boyer-and-uchicago-history <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/1511_Golus_Five-things-Boyer-UChicago_0.jpg" width="1600" height="743" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/jmiller" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">jmiller</span></span> <span>Fri, 11/06/2015 - 20:02</span> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/carrie-golus-ab91-am93"> <a href="/author/carrie-golus-ab91-am93"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Carrie Golus, AB’91, AM’93</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/web-exclusives" hreflang="en">Web exclusives</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item"><p>11.08.2015</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item">His views on Thucydides, Hutchins, Sturm und Drang, and more.</div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Last week <a href="https://president.uchicago.edu/directory/john-w-boyer" target="_blank">John W. Boyer</a>, AM’69, PhD’75, dean of the <a href="https://college.uchicago.edu" target="_blank">College</a>, completed a three-event book tour without going north of 57th Street.</p> <p><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/1511_Golus_Five-things-Boyer-UChicago_spotA.jpg" align="right" />On Wednesday he spoke at the <a href="https://divinity.uchicago.edu" target="_blank">Divinity School</a>’s community lunch in Swift Hall. On Friday he did back-to-back readings at the <a href="http://www.semcoop.com" target="_blank">Seminary Co-op</a>; the store had to schedule a second reading to meet demand.</p> <p>The page-turner in question is <em><a href="http://press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/chicago/U/bo19782446.html" target="_blank">The University of Chicago: A History</a></em> (University of Chicago Press, 2015). The book builds on the 17 monographs he’s published since 1996.</p> <p>At the <a href="https://divinity.uchicago.edu/wednesday-lunch" target="_blank">Div School lecture</a>, Boyer spoke about the history behind his history. Here are five things that might surprise you.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>1.&nbsp; There are notable similarities between Boyer and <a href="https://divinity.uchicago.edu/richard-rosengarten" target="_blank">Richard Rosengarten</a>, AM’88, PhD’94, interim dean of the Divinity School, who introduced Boyer at the lunch.</strong></p> <p>They are the only two <a href="http://president.uchicago.edu/directories/compact/deans" target="_blank">deans</a> who are University alumni. They are the tallest deans. And they both like to ride their bicycles to and from campus. “He’s a little faster than I am,” Rosengarten admitted.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>2.&nbsp; Thucydides and World War II helped inspire the book.</strong></p> <p>When Boyer was a graduate student, one of his mentors was <a href="http://articles.chicagotribune.com/1990-10-13/news/9003260018_1_mr-krieger-intellectual-history-university-professor" target="_blank">Leonard Krieger</a>, a distinguished scholar of German history and the first University Professor at UChicago.</p> <p>During World War II Krieger served in the research and analysis branch of the <a href="http://www.osssociety.org" target="_blank">Office of Strategic Services</a>, the precursor to the <a href="https://www.cia.gov" target="_blank">CIA</a>. His boss was William Langer, a historian on leave from <a href="http://www.harvard.edu" target="_blank">Harvard</a>.</p> <h5>[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_original","fid":"3054","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"589","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"500"}}]] Boyer (left) with Krieger, 1976. (University of Chicago Photographic Archive, <a href="http://photoarchive.lib.uchicago.edu/db.xqy?keywords=Leonard+Krieger" target="_blank">apf3-00778</a>, Special Collections Research Center, University of Chicago Library)</h5> <p>After Pearl Harbor was bombed, Krieger and his colleagues went to talk to Langer in despair. Langer’s advice, according to Boyer, was not to become disheartened: “You’re historians. You’ve already read Thucydides.”</p> <p>What did that have to do with Germany’s victories over Belgium and France? “The way wars start is often very different from the way wars end,” Boyer said.</p> <p>In other words, “Historians often have unique insight into the subject of human agency and contingent events. Outcomes are not predetermined. That may be helpful in guiding and making wiser choices.”</p> <p>So in the late 1990s, when the University was considering making controversial changes to the size of the College, “I remembered this story about Langer and Krieger and Thucydides,” Boyer said. He started digging through the University’s archives “instead of working on the history [<em>Austria, 1867–1985</em>] that <a href="http://global.oup.com" target="_blank">Oxford</a> was expecting.”</p> <p>The result was his first monograph on the historical role of the College in the University—financially, demographically, and culturally.</p> <p><strong>3.&nbsp; Boyer never intended to write a University history.</strong></p> <p>He didn’t even intend to write a second monograph. But the following year brought a fresh controversy over the Core curriculum. Older faculty loved the Core; younger faculty wanted to reduce its size significantly.&nbsp;</p> <p>At some universities they go to war over the football coach, Boyer noted dryly. “At this institution, we go to war over curricula.”</p> <p>So he went back into the archives. He discovered there had been seven or eight different Cores since it was first invented in the 1930s. Another monograph was born.</p> <p>And then, “People began to say, ‘That’s nice. What’s the next one going to be on?’”&nbsp;</p> <h5>[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_original","fid":"3055","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"437","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"500"}}]] President Hutchins “meets” Dean Boyer. (Chicago Special Collections, University of Chicago Library)</h5> <p><strong>4. In Boyer's view, the most fascinating chapter is the one on <a href="https://president.uchicago.edu/directory/robert-maynard-hutchins" target="_blank">Robert Maynard Hutchins</a>.</strong></p> <p>“It had to be <a href="http://news.uchicago.edu/multimedia/john-w-boyer-enormous-talent-robert-hutchins" target="_blank">Hutchins</a>. He’s such a totemic figure. Extraordinarily loved by his supporters, extraordinarily disliked by his detractors.”</p> <p><strong>5.&nbsp; Boyer, a <a href="http://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/back-future" target="_blank">five-term</a> College dean, doesn’t mind a little drama in his University politics.</strong></p> <p>“Sturm und Drang is good. It’s good for the soul.”&nbsp;</p> <h6><em>Updated 11.09.2015</em></h6> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/university-news" hreflang="en">University News</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/reading" hreflang="en">Reading</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/history" hreflang="en">History</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refuchicago field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/college" hreflang="en">The College</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/university-history-0" hreflang="en">University history</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/university-chicago-press" hreflang="en">University of Chicago Press</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/wednesday-lunch-series" hreflang="en">Wednesday Lunch Series</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refformats field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/formats/list" hreflang="en">List</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-relatedstories field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item">“<a href="http://www.uchicago.edu/features/historian_illuminates_uchicagos_125_years" target="_blank">Historian Illuminates Chicago’s 125 Years</a>” (University of Chicago News Office, 09.14.2015) “<a href="http://www.uchicago.edu/features/Core_combines_timeless_courses_and_fresh_ideas/" target="_blank">Core Combines Timeless Courses and Fresh Ideas</a>” (University of Chicago News Office, 12.23.2013) “<a href="http://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/back-future" target="_self">Back to the Future</a>” (<em>University of Chicago Magazine</em>, Nov–Dec/12) “<a href="http://thecore.uchicago.edu/Summer2012/departments/EotQ-puppet-government.shtml" target="_blank">Puppet Government</a>” (<em>Core</em>, Summer/12)</div> <div class="field field--name-field-relatedlinks field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item">Join the UChicago 125 conversation using #<a href="http://125.uchicago.edu/stay-connected/" target="_blank">UChicago125</a>. Read along with the <a href="https://alumniandfriends.uchicago.edu/volunteer/volunteer-tools-resources/125th-anniversary-global-book-club" target="_blank">125th Anniversary Global Book Club</a>. Follow @<a href="http://www.twitter.com/UChicago" target="_blank">UChicago</a> and @<a href="http://www.twitter.com/UChicagoCollege" target="_blank">UChicagoCollege</a>. Visit the UChicago 125 <a href="http://125.uchicago.edu/" target="_blank">website</a>.</div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/five-things-you-didnt-know-about-john-boyer-and-uchicago-history" data-a2a-title="Five things you didn’t know about John Boyer and UChicago history"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Funiversity-news%2Ffive-things-you-didnt-know-about-john-boyer-and-uchicago-history&amp;title=Five%20things%20you%20didn%E2%80%99t%20know%20about%20John%20Boyer%20and%20UChicago%20history"></a></span> Sat, 07 Nov 2015 02:02:22 +0000 jmiller 5185 at https://mag.uchicago.edu Memoir: The new fairy tale https://mag.uchicago.edu/arts-humanities/memoir-new-fairy-tale <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/1511_Gibson_Memoir-fairy-tale.jpg" width="1600" height="743" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/jmiller" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">jmiller</span></span> <span>Tue, 11/03/2015 - 22:02</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item">(Photo via Pixabay, public domain)</div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/lydialyle-gibson"> <a href="/author/lydialyle-gibson"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Lydialyle Gibson</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/web-exclusives" hreflang="en">Web exclusives</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item"><p>11.04.2015</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item">UChicago literary scholar Armando Maggi, PhD’95, says “once upon a time” is now.</div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>For years, <a href="http://rll.uchicago.edu/faculty/maggi" target="_blank">Armando Maggi</a>, PhD’95, professor of Italian literature and a scholar of Renaissance culture, has been telling Americans that our fairy tales are all used up. That Cinderella and Snow White and Sleeping Beauty—at least as we know them today, with their bright, orderly narratives and easy happy endings—don’t have much left to teach us.</p> <h5>[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_original","fid":"3030","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"374","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"500"}}]] Illustration of Sleeping Beauty from <em>Three Fairy Princesses: Snow-White, Sleeping Beauty, Cinderella</em> (1885) by C. Paterson. (Public domain)</h5> <p><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/1511_Gibson_Memoir-fairy-tale_spotA.jpg" width="150" align="right" />And that even as we return to them again and again, attempting to mine new truths from their exhausted mythologies, they offer little meaning. “We are, in a sense, beating a dead horse,” Maggi <a href="http://mag.uchicago.edu/arts-humanities/spellbound" target="_blank">told the <em>Magazine</em></a> in 2012. “We feel like this horse could still ride us somewhere, but it can’t. We need to find another vehicle.”</p> <p>He thinks perhaps he’s found one. This year Maggi published <a href="http://press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/chicago/P/bo19804503.html" target="_blank"><em>Preserving the Spell: Basile’s</em> <em>“The Tale of Tales” and Its Afterlife in the Fairy-Tale Tradition</em></a> (University of Chicago Press). The book traces the evolution of modern-day fairy tales from their 17th-century Italian origins, but it also imagines a way forward: memoir.</p> <p align="center"><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/hr.png" width="450" /></p> <h2>What do you mean, memoirs are the new fairy tales?</h2> <p>When I was doing my research, I went to <a href="http://www.semcoop.com/57th-street-books" target="_blank">57th Street Books</a>, and I bought piles of memoirs. I just got everything they had.</p> <p>The thread that emerges from all these works is that our life is somehow magical itself. That’s what American memoirs are about. They detail some kind of turning point in a person’s life, an experience that becomes a trial.</p> <p>This is typical of a fairy tale: the hero who has to face a trial and overcomes it. In memoirs, having a difficulty, like a drug addiction, an abusive parent, or a child who suffers from mental illness, marks the beginning of a person’s life and then is followed by a journey toward healing and resurrection. That is a fairy tale.</p> <p>Maybe an American reader is not totally aware of the uniqueness of the American memoir. The genre is not so widespread in other Western cultures.</p> <p><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/1511_Gibson_Memoir-fairy-tale_spotC.jpg" width="150" align="right" />Here, even Joan Didion, who writes the most unmagical book, because she wants to be very scientific. But in her memoir, <em><a href="http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/7815.The_Year_of_Magical_Thinking" target="_blank">The Year of Magical Thinking</a></em>, magic is everywhere. Going through the ritual of saying, “I cannot give my dead husband’s shoes away, because how can he come back without shoes? I have to keep the shoes.” And, “If I am by myself in the bedroom he will overcome his shyness and be able to come back.”</p> <h2>Why is memoir culture so different here?</h2> <p>I think there’s a parallel with the enormous production in the United States of stories, movies, television shows, graphic novels, and so on, that are about the fairy tales we all know. Retelling them, remixing them. There is no comparison with the rest of Western culture.</p> <p>Here we take fairy tales, magic tales, and wonder tales so seriously. This is the land of magic. I think it’s because overall American culture is still able to dream about a better future, to dream that something better is going to come. It’s part of the American DNA.</p> <p>That’s also why we take memoirs so seriously. Do you remember James Frey’s <em><a href="https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1241.A_Million_Little_Pieces" target="_blank">A Million Little Pieces</a></em>? And what happened to the author when people found out that it wasn’t all completely true? The intense anger and sense of betrayal.</p> <p><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/1511_Gibson_Memoir-fairy-tale_spotD.jpg" width="150" align="right" />It was like he had insulted a religious practice, like he had done something heretical. It was like, “How dare you?” And then he was excommunicated. It was like he had come up with a sacred text that said, “See, I can be saved. I can be born again. Look at what I went through, and now I’m a new person.”</p> <p>Even though the bottom line of his struggle with addiction and alcohol was pretty faithful, the fact that he had not been 100 percent faithful to reality was seen as a complete betrayal.</p> <h2>The uproar was so intense—much more so than, for instance, the reaction when a journalist is found to have plagiarized or fabricated a story.</h2> <p>Yes. I think it’s because the memoir touched upon the deep-seated desire for change that is inside of us. The desire for improving ourselves, for becoming better people, for finding a better life.</p> <p>The happy ending for all of us. Then this story turned out to be not completely faithful to his story.</p> <h2>In the book, you use the phrase the “magic of reality,” to describe what memoirs are doing.</h2> <p>In the beginning, I looked at memoirs in a more negative light. A lot of critics say there are too many memoirs. Everyone is writing memoirs. But then I realized that if they are written, it’s because we read them and we need them. They are necessary. They are a new kind of fairy tale.&nbsp;</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/arts-humanities" hreflang="en">Arts &amp; Humanities</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/books" hreflang="en">Books</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/reading" hreflang="en">Reading</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/memoirs" hreflang="en">Memoirs</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/fairy-tales" hreflang="en">Fairy Tales</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refuchicago field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/humanities-division" hreflang="en">Division of the Humanities</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refformats field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/formats/interview" hreflang="en">Interview</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-relatedstories field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item">“<a href="http://mag.uchicago.edu/arts-humanities/spellbound" target="_blank">Spellbound</a>” (<em>University of Chicago Magazine</em>, May-June/12) “<a href="http://mag.uchicago.edu/arts-humanities/told-and-retold" target="_blank">Told and Retold</a>” (<em>University of Chicago Magazine</em>, May–June/12)</div> <div class="field field--name-field-relatedlinks field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item">Learn more about <a href="http://press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/chicago/P/bo19804503.html" target="_blank">Maggi’s new book</a>. Follow @<a href="http://twitter.com/uchicagohum" target="_blank">UChicagoHum</a>. <a href="http://campaign.uchicago.edu/priorities/humanities/nurture-the-arts/" target="_blank">Join the campaign</a> and nurture the arts at UChicago. Support the Division of the Humanities as they work to establish new professorships, artist residencies, and student fellowships to inspire the creative potential of students, faculty, and working artists.</div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/arts-humanities/memoir-new-fairy-tale" data-a2a-title="Memoir: The new fairy tale"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Farts-humanities%2Fmemoir-new-fairy-tale&amp;title=Memoir%3A%20The%20new%20fairy%20tale"></a></span> Wed, 04 Nov 2015 04:02:30 +0000 jmiller 5158 at https://mag.uchicago.edu The importance of “sleazy trash” https://mag.uchicago.edu/arts-humanities/importance-sleazy-trash <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/1510_Gregg_Banned-Books-Krug.jpg" width="1600" height="743" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/jmiller" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">jmiller</span></span> <span>Thu, 10/01/2015 - 15:08</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item">Above: The American Library Association’s annual Banned Books Week traces its founding to librarian and free speech advocate Judith Krug, AM’64. Below, top: Portrait of Krug. (Image and photo courtesy of the American Library Association)</div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/helen-gregg-ab09"> <a href="/author/helen-gregg-ab09"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Helen Gregg, AB’09</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/web-exclusives" hreflang="en">Web exclusives</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item"><p>10.01.2015</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item">Banned Books Week and the legacy of librarian Judith Krug, AM’64.</div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item">It’s <a href="http://www.ala.org/bbooks/bannedbooksweek" target="_blank">Banned Books Week</a>, when bookstores and libraries host events and proudly display the titles most often challenged as being too obscene, offensive, or subversive to be on the shelves. <img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/1510_Gregg_Banned-Books-Krug_spotA.jpg" align="right" /> Banned Books Week was cofounded and championed by Judith Krug, AM’64 (1940–2009), an alumna of University’s <a href="http://www.lib.uchicago.edu/e/alumnifriends/GLS.html" target="_blank">Graduate Library School</a>. By the time the first weeklong event was held in 1982, Krug had been fighting censorship in libraries for more than 15 years. Dedicating an entire week to highlighting banned books is a “chance to say to the American public, we have wonderful freedoms that are guaranteed to us in our <a href="http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/charters/constitution_transcript.html" target="_blank">Constitution</a> and <a href="http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/charters/bill_of_rights_transcript.html" target="_blank">Bill of Rights</a>,” Krug once <a href="http://tabcarson.com/Geektastic/2011/09/25/geek-of-the-week-judith-krug/" target="_blank">told CSPAN</a>. “And two of the most important ones are freedom of speech and freedom of the press. But they are very fragile, and if you don’t use them, you really stand a chance that somebody’s going to take them away.” A lifelong opponent of censorship, Krug joined the <a href="http://www.ala.org" target="_blank">American Library Association</a> in 1965. In 1967 she was appointed the first director of its <a href="http://www.ala.org/offices/oif" target="_blank">Office for Intellectual Freedom</a>, which supports libraries and librarians in providing free, open access to patrons. In 1969 she became executive director of the ALA’s legal and educational support arm, the <a href="http://www.ftrf.org" target="_blank">Freedom to Read Foundation</a>. Krug was a major figure in several free speech cases that reached the <a href="http://www.supremecourt.gov" target="_blank">Supreme Court</a>, and in the early 2000s challenged numerous laws that sought to censor the internet. Krug <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2009/04/15/us/15krug.html" target="_blank">made a point</a> of not letting her personal feelings about a work influence her duties as a librarian. She found the <a href="http://www.jbs.org" target="_blank">John Birch Society</a>’s <span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em><a href="https://archive.org/stream/TheBlueBook/MicrosoftWord-Document1_djvu.txt" target="_blank">The Blue Book</a></em></span> offensive but helped ensure it remained on library shelves. In 1992 she <a href="http://articles.chicagotribune.com/1992-12-13/news/9204230459_1_adult-room-librarians-medium-sized-library" target="_blank">told the <em>Chicago Tribune</em></a> that <a href="http://www.madonna.com" target="_blank">Madonna</a>’s book <em><a href="https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/302236.Sex" target="_blank">Sex</a> </em>was “sleazy trash, but it should be in every medium-sized library in the United States.”</div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/arts-humanities" hreflang="en">Arts &amp; Humanities</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/books" hreflang="en">Books</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/reading" hreflang="en">Reading</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/censorship" hreflang="en">Censorship</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refuchicago field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/library-0" hreflang="en">Library</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-relatedstories field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item">“<a href="http://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/opening-inquiry" target="_blank">Opening Inquiry</a>” (<em>University of Chicago Magazine</em>, July–Aug/15) “<a href="http://magazine.uchicago.edu/9512/9512Investig.html" target="_blank">Room for Debate</a>” (<em>University of Chicago Magazine</em>, Dec/95)</div> <div class="field field--name-field-relatedlinks field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item">Follow <a href="https://twitter.com/BannedBooksWeek" target="_blank">@BannedBooksWeek</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/bannedbooksweek?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Ehashtag%20" target="_blank">#bannedbooksweek</a> on Twitter Read about Kurt Vonnegut’s (AM’71) <em><a href="http://www.pen.org/nonfiction/kurt-vonnegut’s-slaughterhouse-five" target="_blank">Slaughterhouse-Five</a></em> Download the Press’s <a href="http://www.press.uchicago.edu/books/freeEbook.html" target="_blank">latest free ebook</a> Support the <a href="http://campaign.uchicago.edu/priorities/library/" target="_blank">University of Chicago Library</a></div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/arts-humanities/importance-sleazy-trash" data-a2a-title="The importance of “sleazy trash”"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Farts-humanities%2Fimportance-sleazy-trash&amp;title=The%20importance%20of%20%E2%80%9Csleazy%20trash%E2%80%9D"></a></span> Thu, 01 Oct 2015 20:08:07 +0000 jmiller 5019 at https://mag.uchicago.edu