The University of Chicago Magazine https://mag.uchicago.edu/publication-sources/university-chicago-magazine en The OI at 100 https://mag.uchicago.edu/oi100 <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/19_Summer_ALL_OI-At-100.jpg" width="2000" height="1000" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/rsmith" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">rsmith</span></span> <span>Thu, 08/15/2019 - 10:13</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>This 10-ton bull statue was excavated during the Oriental Instituteʼs Persian Expedition (1931–39). (Photo courtesy the Oriental Institute)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/university-chicago-magazine" hreflang="en">The University of Chicago Magazine</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item">Summer/19</div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>UChicagoʼs Oriental Institute celebrates a monumental first century.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>In 1919 James Henry Breasted founded the <a href="https://oi.uchicago.edu/">Oriental Institute</a> at the University of Chicago. To celebrate the OI centennial, the <em>Magazine</em> took a look at the past, present, and future of the Universityʼs first research institute. </p> <p><a href="https://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/fertile-soil"><strong>Fertile Soil</strong></a><br /> From small seeds, the OI thrived and grew.</p> <p><a href="https://mag.uchicago.edu/arts-humanities/ground"><strong>From the Ground Up</strong></a><br /> A brief history in pictures of some essential people, places, and treasures.</p> <p><a href="https://mag.uchicago.edu/arts-humanities/found-translation"><strong>Found in Translation</strong></a><br /> Director Christopher Woods, his work in Sumerology, and his vision for the OI’s second century.</p> <p><a href="https://mag.uchicago.edu/arts-humanities/past-and-future"><strong>Past and Future</strong></a><br /> How has the institute’s work evolved since 1919? A faculty roundtable.</p> <p><a href="https://mag.uchicago.edu/arts-humanities/chalk-egyptian"><strong>Chalk Like an Egyptian</strong></a><br /> The museum’s public outreach taps the littlest Egyptologists.</p> <p>The OI will celebrate its milestone throughout the 2019–20 academic year. To find centennial lectures, films, exhibitions, and more, visit <a href="https://oi100.uchicago.edu">oi100.uchicago.edu</a>.</p> <hr /><p><em>Do you have your own memories of or reflections on the OI? Write to us at <a href="mailto:uchicago-magazine@uchicago.edu">uchicago-magazine@uchicago.edu</a>. We’ll share your words with the OI and University Archives and publish a few in the Fall/19 issue.</em></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/arts-humanities" hreflang="en">Arts &amp; Humanities</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/archaeology" hreflang="en">Archaeology</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/middle-east" hreflang="en">Middle East</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/museums" hreflang="en">Museums</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refuchicago field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/oriental-institute" hreflang="en">Oriental Institute</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/oicentennial" hreflang="en">Oriental Institute Centennial</a></div> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/oi100" data-a2a-title="The OI at 100"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Foi100&amp;title=The%20OI%20at%20100"></a></span> Thu, 15 Aug 2019 15:13:34 +0000 rsmith 7165 at https://mag.uchicago.edu Eve L. Ewing, AB’08 https://mag.uchicago.edu/law-policy-society/eve-l-ewing-ab08 <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/19_Summer_Ewing_UChicagoan%20copy.jpg" width="2000" height="1000" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/admin" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">admin</span></span> <span>Fri, 08/09/2019 - 17:17</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>(Illustration by Lucie Rice)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/university-chicago-magazine" hreflang="en">The University of Chicago Magazine</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item">Summer/19</div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Questions for the author, College alumna, and SSA assistant professor.</p></div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><h2>What surprising job have you had in the past?</h2> <p>When I was younger, I worked at the legendary ice cream parlor Margie’s Candies, up on Armitage and Western near where I grew up. I also worked at a call center for a while. I was really good at politely reading a script to people over the phone.</p> <h2>What do you hate that everyone else loves?</h2> <p>I don’t hate cats, but I’m terribly, devastatingly allergic to them, so just the thought of being around them makes me anxious.</p> <h2>What do you love that everyone else hates?</h2> <p>Grits with butter and sugar. This makes me an oppressed minority in my community, and I don’t care.</p> <h2>What’s your least useful talent?</h2> <p>I do a really good imitation of Lumpy Space Princess from <em>Adventure Time</em> as well as a pretty good Princess Peach.</p> <h2>What was the last book you finished?</h2> <p><em>White Negroes</em> by UChicago graduate student Lauren Jackson. I was asked to write a blurb for it. It’s going to spur some good conversations when it comes out.</p> <div class="story-inline-img"> <figure role="group"><img alt="Eve Ewing portrait illustration" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="a955ea03-8965-4e87-ad05-047c1295c17f" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/19_Summer_Ewing_UChicagoan_SpotA.jpg" /><figcaption>(Illustration by Lucie Rice)</figcaption></figure></div> <h2>What advice would you give to a brand-new Maroon?</h2> <p>Chicago has 77 neighborhoods. Pick one, look up a restaurant or bookstore to check out, and go there without using a ride-share.</p> <h2>What book—or other work or idea—do you relish teaching?</h2> <p>I absolutely love teaching about Frederick Douglass. Any class I teach about education begins with the excerpt from his autobiography where he talks about learning to read and write while enslaved. I think it’s an important way to begin a conversation about what education represents for people.</p> <h2>What book changed your life?</h2> <p><em>Blacks</em>, the collection of Gwendolyn Brooks’s poems.</p> <h2>What was the last book you put down before you finished it?</h2> <p>I really wish I could tell you that because it was a widely lauded book that was just terrible, and I was so disappointed. But that would cause writer drama! But oh, it was bad. I’m still bummed about it.</p> <h2>Tell us the best piece of advice you’ve received—or the worst.</h2> <p>“Protect your byline.” My friend and the <em>Atlantic</em> writer Vann Newkirk says that, and I think it applies to everything, writing and otherwise. Always think carefully about what it means to attach your name to something, because your name is all you have.</p> <p> </p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/law-policy-society" hreflang="en">Law, Policy &amp; Society</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-refuchicago field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/college-alumni" hreflang="en">College alumni</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refformats field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/uchicagoan" hreflang="en">The UChicagoan</a></div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/law-policy-society/eve-l-ewing-ab08" data-a2a-title="Eve L. Ewing, AB’08"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Flaw-policy-society%2Feve-l-ewing-ab08&amp;title=Eve%20L.%20Ewing%2C%20AB%E2%80%9908"></a></span> Fri, 09 Aug 2019 22:17:25 +0000 admin 7161 at https://mag.uchicago.edu An expanding universe of discovery https://mag.uchicago.edu/science-medicine/expanding-universe-discovery <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/19_Summer_Olinto_Expanding-Universe-Discovery.jpg" width="2000" height="1000" alt="Angela Olinto" title="Angela Olinto" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/admin" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">admin</span></span> <span>Fri, 08/09/2019 - 17:17</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Angela Olinto, dean, Physical Sciences Division, and Albert A. Michelson Distinguished Service Professor, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Enrico Fermi Institute, and the College. (Photography by John Zich)</p></div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/angela-olinto"> <a href="/author/angela-olinto"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Angela Olinto</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/university-chicago-magazine" hreflang="en">The University of Chicago Magazine</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item">Summer/19</div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>The dean of the physical sciences shares a future vision anchored in the divisionʼs illustrious history.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>When I started as dean of the <a href="https://physicalsciences.uchicago.edu/">Physical Sciences Division</a> (PSD) in July 2018, <a href="https://www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/parker-solar-probe">NASA</a> was preparing to launch the <a href="https://news.uchicago.edu/tag/parker-solar-probe">Parker Solar Probe</a>, a spacecraft designed to make critical observations of the sun. <a href="https://mag.uchicago.edu/science-medicine/hot-pursuit">The probe is the first NASA spacecraft to be named after a living person</a>, my colleague and a professor emeritus at the University of Chicago, <a href="https://astro.uchicago.edu/people/eugene-n-parker.php"><strong>Eugene Parker</strong></a>. Parker developed the theory of the solar wind in 1958 and helped define the field of heliophysics.</p> <p>The timing of this NASA mission seemed especially significant as I took the helm of a division with a rich history of shaping and defining fields. There are countless University of Chicago physical scientists and mathematicians who have paved the way for researchers across the globe, including <a href="https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/physics/1907/michelson/biographical/">Albert A. Michelson</a>, whom my title honors. Michelson founded the Department of Physics at UChicago and helped measure the speed of light, becoming the first American scientist to win a Nobel Prize. Chemist <a href="https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/chemistry/1960/libby/biographical/">Willard Libby</a> developed the technique for dating organic compounds using carbon-14 here. Former faculty member <a href="https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/physics/1963/mayer/biographical/">Maria Goeppert Mayer</a> proposed the nuclear shell model of the atomic nucleus and became the second woman to win a Nobel Prize in physics. And Leonard E. Dickson, PhD 1896, who earned the first doctorate in mathematics from UChicago, was one of the earliest American researchers in the field of abstract algebra.</p> <p>As dean of the PSD, I have the unique opportunity to support the next generation of field-defining scientists who are following in these esteemed footsteps. PSD is expanding our computer science program and attracting new faculty members and students to lead advances in artificial intelligence, machine learning, internet security, and more. This past fall, the <a href="https://computerscience.uchicago.edu/">Department of Computer Science</a> moved into the <a href="https://facilities.uchicago.edu/construction/john_crerar_library_renovation/">John Crerar Library</a>, a newly renovated state-of-the-art academic building with space for experimental research and exploration. We are also spearheading a campus-wide data science initiative, which will bring together faculty and students from computer science, statistics, and the social sciences.</p> <p>Interdisciplinary connections not only facilitate research in our fields, but they also help us address the most important problems facing our world. Our chemists partner with researchers in the <a href="https://biologicalsciences.uchicago.edu/">Biological Sciences Division</a> and clinicians at <a href="https://www.uchicagomedicine.org/">UChicago Medicine</a> to develop new therapies to prevent and cure human diseases. Our geophysical scientists collaborate with statisticians, computer scientists, and policy researchers to address climate change. Our mathematicians and statisticians develop fundamental structures and concepts that inform new areas of science. Our physicists and astrophysicists work together to research new forms of matter and energy. And chemists, physicists, computer scientists, and researchers from the newly created <a href="https://pme.uchicago.edu/">Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering</a> collaborate to design new materials and advance the science of quantum information.</p> <p>This fruitful intellectual environment would not be possible without attention to <a href="https://physicalsciences.uchicago.edu/about/diversity-inclusion/">equity, diversity, and inclusion (EDI) </a>throughout the PSD. This fall we hired a director of EDI to build on the foundation established by our departments, institutes, and centers. We will continue to grow our mentorship and pipeline programs for students from underrepresented backgrounds and to promote a climate where our diverse community feels supported and valued.</p> <p>As we look to the future, we plan to expand our master’s and continuing education programs so that more students have the opportunity to study the physical sciences at UChicago and to influence our world through business and industry.I’m excited and proud to serve a preeminent division at UChicago that is driving innovation and discovery, fostering an inclusive and creative intellectual environment, and helping shape the next generation of physical scientists and mathematicians.</p></div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/science-medicine" hreflang="en">Science &amp; Medicine</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-refuchicago field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/physical-sciences-division" hreflang="en">Physical Sciences Division</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refformats field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/formats/agenda" hreflang="en">On the Agenda</a></div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/science-medicine/expanding-universe-discovery" data-a2a-title="An expanding universe of discovery"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Fscience-medicine%2Fexpanding-universe-discovery&amp;title=An%20expanding%20universe%20of%20discovery"></a></span> Fri, 09 Aug 2019 22:17:25 +0000 admin 7160 at https://mag.uchicago.edu Readers sound off https://mag.uchicago.edu/sum19mail <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/18Fall_Letters.jpg" width="2000" height="1050" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/admin" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">admin</span></span> <span>Fri, 08/09/2019 - 17:17</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>(CC0 Public Domain)</p></div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/university-chicago-magazine" hreflang="en">The University of Chicago Magazine</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item">Summer/19</div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Readers weigh in on the specialness of Special Collections, medical care models, what ails our democracy, and more.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><h2>Special recollections</h2> <p>I was delighted by “<a href="https://mag.uchicago.edu/scrc">The Secrets of UChicago’s Special Collections</a>” (Spring/19). As a student in the Graduate Library School, I had the privilege of working with Bob Rosenthal, AM’55, for a couple of years when Regenstein was the new library. Along with general cataloging and editing, I served as exhibits coordinator. I had the chance to work with a number of experts at the University to organize and exhibit their specialties through books, manuscripts, and artifacts. I also put together a catalog for each exhibit. It was a really fun job. I am eternally grateful for the experience of working with Rosenthal.</p> <p>Sadly, the University closed its library school many years ago. I never understood why. In the late 1960s, the Library School was well ahead of its time in recognizing the impact that computers were to have on the way libraries (and now the rest of us) operate. I have benefitted in later adventures from having been introduced to the basic mysteries of computer programming (running punch cards through the computer at midnight when time was available). My library degree put me through law school a few years later.</p> <p>My position at Special Collections at the Regenstein is one of my most special life experiences.</p> <p><em>Carolyn Whitmore Baldwin, AM’71<br /> Concord, New Hampshire</em></p> <h2>Democracy dims</h2> <p>The article by Jason Kelly on Tom Ginsburg and Aziz Huq’s book <em>How to Save a Constitutional Democracy</em> (University of Chicago Press, 2018; “<a href="https://mag.uchicago.edu/law-policy-society/can-democracy-survive">Can Democracy Survive?</a>,” Spring/19) leaves out at least two factors that are chipping away at democracy in the United States. I don’t know whether this is the fault of the book or the article.</p> <p>The factors that are mentioned all line up to criticize Donald Trump. While I’m no fan of his, the article appears one-sided. One factor negatively impacting democracy in the United States has been the role of the courts in vastly expanding their power and curtailing that of voters and even elected officials. This has led to a lot of frustration and in fact fueled populism.</p> <p>Another factor is the “deep state”—or, more appropriately, a lack of neutrality on the part of the government bureaucracy. Ginsburg and Huq think “bureaucratic rule of law” and a nonpartisan civil service are a pillar of democracy. I agree yet believe that these have been weakened a great deal in the United States due to partisanship. This is not mentioned in the article probably because it doesn’t line up to get the bad guy.</p> <p>In light of actions by the IRS and FBI and the publicly expressed political opinions of officials in those agencies, nonpartisanship has been eroded and yet is not mentioned in the article. It is hard to imagine that IRS employees, who through their union contribute close to 90 percent to one party, are nonpartisan.</p> <p>I hope the book explores the role of courts and partisan governmental bureaucracy in weakening democracy. After all, the “populist” movement itself, at least in the United States, has been spurred by a perceived weakening of democracy. The reasons for this should also be examined.</p> <p><em>Tom Schroder, AB’67, AM’69<br /> Ave Maria, Florida</em></p> <h2>Comprehensive care</h2> <p>I read with interest “<a href="https://mag.uchicago.edu/science-medicine/value-primary-care">The Value of Primary Care</a>” (Spring/19). When I graduated from the Pritzker School of Medicine in 1972 and established a solo family practice, it was glaringly obvious that I saved Medicare money on hospital patients. It happened every day. I was deeply involved with my patients’ hospital care and shared Ram Krishnamoorthi’s frustration with trying to get the attention of the narrowly focused specialists, but it was worth it because I often was able to correct their false understandings about the patients’ medical conditions. It was frustrating, though, because no one other than the patients valued the work I did. Not the specialists; not the hospitals, who complained that I kept the patients in the hospital too long; and certainly not the insurance companies.</p> <p>Knowledge of their medicine dosages, tolerances, and allergies often averted adverse medical outcomes while in the hospital. And patients were often loath to take new medicines without approval of the family doctor. In my experience, unless you’re there when they leave the hospital, patients simply don’t get those new meds filled.</p> <p>Finally, I’ll comment on the economics of practice. I had a panel of over 2,000 patients, not the 200 described in your article, and I had no social workers, although my staff was adept at mobilizing community resources. Seeing hospital patients is quite time intensive and often is not reimbursed by Medicare. I simply could not continue to devote time to hospital patients and neglect those others, who were my bread and butter. I don’t see how it could ever be so without radical restructuring of the payment system.</p> <p>Hospitalists helped my bottom line, although I sincerely regret that I gave up my hospital patients to them.</p> <p><em>Louis L. Constan, SB’68, MD’72<br /> Saginaw, Michigan</em></p> <p>David Meltzer seized the opportunity to study the impact of continuity of care on outcomes for high-risk Medicare patients. His hypothesis is that continuity improves satisfaction and quality of care and decreases cost.</p> <p>In 1951 the University of Chicago School of Medicine curriculum included a quarter of research in the freshman year. When I began clinical medicine as a third-year student in 1953, each of my patients was my patient day and night. I was to be called “doctor,” even though I had not yet earned that degree, and I would be the first doctor my patients would see. Continuity was a theme.</p> <p>During surgical residency, my rotations were six to 12 months long, compared to much shorter rotations in residencies elsewhere. When I became the chief resident and instructor in surgery, I was on call and available every day and every night of the year, except for the three-day weekend during which I excused myself to wed my South Side Chicago bride. So continuity was a fundamental feature of my education. In none of the three medical schools I served thereafter did I find continuity like that at the U of C.</p> <p>Now we have what I call shift medicine, with duration-of-work restrictions for residents, routine changing of the guard, and a continuous eye on the clock in virtually all settings. Physicians are distracted from patients by the need to type into computerized medical records. Teaching physicians are hampered in delegating responsibility for patient care to their residents by needing to prove that they are present. Medical education has suffered, and continuity is not a theme.</p> <p>How about the future? I predict that Meltzer will conclusively prove the value of continuity of care for patients and physicians. I think they will find cost-of-care savings as a byproduct of continuity. If so, the application of the Meltzer model to the medical world at large will be challenging, at least in part because primary care physicians are not focused specialists.</p> <p>My 43 years as a focused specialist in thoracic surgery involved care for many patients who suffered because definitive care was delayed. Earlier consultation could have led to better outcomes. So, David Meltzer, I applaud your work and wish you well. I encourage you to give special emphasis to teaching primary care physicians that ego and cost considerations should not impair early consultation with a specialist. There should be pride, and no shame, in asking for timely help on behalf of patients.</p> <p><em>John R. Benfield, MD’55<br /> Los Angeles</em></p> <h2>Ratty T-shirts wanted</h2> <p>Having been a Reg Rat back in my school days, I quite loved the Reg Rat T-shirt on the cover of the latest issue (<a href="https://mag.uchicago.edu/issue/spring19">Spring/19</a>). Any ideas on where I might purchase or procure such a shirt? I would wear one proudly.</p> <p><em>Kenneth C. Baron, AB’87<br /> New York City</em></p> <p><em>Baron’s was one of several such queries we received. The Alumni Association is seeking out the artist for permission to reproduce the T-shirt. To learn more, visit <a href="https://mag.uchicago.edu/reg-rat">mag.uchicago.edu/reg-rat</a>.</em>—Ed.</p> <h2>One goal among many</h2> <p>How far should one go in seeking diversity? In “<a href="https://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/creating-more-diverse-and-inclusive-uchicago">Creating a More Diverse and Inclusive UChicago</a>” (On the Agenda, Spring/19), University vice provost Melissa Gilliam tells us that the quest for diversity requires that we “allow our individual assumptions and biases to be challenged, our points of view to evolve and change, and ourselves to be held accountable for the environment we create.” We are admonished that this can be difficult.</p> <p>The quoted words sound nice, but what exactly do they mean? What assumptions and biases must be challenged to achieve diversity? I hope they don’t include the assumption that a great university should select the intellectually strongest, even at the cost of some diversity.</p> <p>Albert Einstein, Enrico Fermi, Lise Meitner, Thurgood Marshall, Richard Wright, Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr., Sandra Day O’Connor: there is a natural diversity in great talent, and it does not have to be forced. If one believes otherwise, it is proof that one does not really believe that merit and diversity are compatible. And, to the extent that they may not be fully compatible at a given point in time, great universities like the University of Chicago should opt for intellect. The fundamental purposes of universities are the advancement of knowledge and the development of educated citizens, and these are best achieved by selecting those of greatest intellect, especially among the faculty.</p> <p>Perhaps there are some counterarguments. In certain fields, such as black studies, diversity is seen as a necessary predicate to effective teaching, learning, and understanding. In those circumstances, diversity is not a goal in and of itself; it is a qualification for the education of students and for the advancement of knowledge. It is also true that intellectual merit can be difficult to assess fairly, and that in the past racial and ethnic minorities have been judged unfairly. But going forward an honest and best judgment of intellectual merit should come first.</p> <p>Outstanding research universities should put the advancement of knowledge above all else, and ordinarily this requires that intellectual merit be at the forefront of all criteria, especially for faculty and research personnel. I feel sure Gilliam does not mean to challenge this foundational assumption of what a university should be. But I am troubled that the extent of this and many universities’ focus on diversity could end up compromising the most basic reasons for their existence.</p> <p><em>Robert S. Venning, AM’66<br /> Oakland, California</em></p> <h2>A university’s purpose</h2> <p>I am not sure what is more disappointing or embarrassing: the letter that Michael Sanders, MBA’74, wrote or that the <em>Magazine</em> chose to publish it (<a href="https://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/readers-sound-38">Letters</a>, Spring/19). I am not a big Milton Friedman, AM’33, fan, but I respect Sanders’s right to express his opinion and believe that a strong academic institution thrives when there is a diversity of opinion. I took my daughter to see Grinnell College as part of our college tours. I always ask the tour guide, “What is one thing you would change about the school?” The Grinnell guide’s answer: “I wish we had more conservative viewpoints on campus, not because I’m a conservative, but because I believe we need a diversity of opinion.” I still send money even though the University saw fit to establish the Becker Friedman Institute, because I am grateful for the education I received. I hope Sanders can gain a better understanding of the true purpose of a university.</p> <p><em>Victor S. Sloan, AB’80<br /> Flemington, New Jersey</em></p> <h2>Great adaptation</h2> <p>I was delighted and impressed with Susie Allen’s (AB’09) account of the brilliant architectural transformation of the former Royal Hong Kong Police Force’s Special Branch detention center on Mt. Davis into a new UChicago campus (“<a href="https://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/view-tree-house-knowledge">The View from the Tree House of Knowledge</a>,” Winter/19).</p> <p>In fall 1965 I stayed in a friend’s government flat overlooking the site for three weeks while preparing for postdoc research on urban and cultural change in Tsuen Wan, New Territories. I never could have imagined that this isolated, windswept repository for political “troublemakers” would one day be a beautifully situated UChicago intellectual and social center.</p> <p>My doctoral thesis, <em>Ocean Shipping in the Evolution of Hong Kong</em>, was published as a Department of Geography research paper.</p> <p><em>Baruch Boxer, AM’57, PhD’61<br /> Palo Alto, California</em></p> <h2>A picture worth 1,000 memories</h2> <p>On page 77 of the Fall/18 <em>Magazine</em> (Alumni News), there is a <a href="http://photoarchive.lib.uchicago.edu/db.xqy?one=apf2-03331.xml">charming picture</a> of a lovely young lady reading and listening to poetry. Perhaps you’d like to know that she is Nancy Cushwa, AB’53, AM’62. She was a dear friend of my wife, Petra Herd Rosenberg, EX’53, as was Ruth Curd, AB’52, later Dickinson.</p> <p><em>David Rosenberg, PhB’48, SB’50, MD’54<br /> Highland Park, Illinois</em></p> <h2>Info, please</h2> <p>Researching family history, I came across a 2017 <em>Magazine</em> article regarding the Chicago Pile (“<a href="https://mag.uchicago.edu/science-medicine/core-stories">Core Stories</a>,” Fall/17). I had a great grand aunt, Rose Watt, who lived in Cook County, Illinois. According to a family story, Mrs. Watt had a certificate for her contribution to the Manhattan Project.</p> <p>Born in Wigan, Lancashire, England, in 1895, Mrs. Watt emigrated to Chicago in 1927 with her Scottish husband, Sydney Watt, and three children. When they were naturalized in 1942, they lived on Ashland Avenue.</p> <p>I would like to know if the story is true. I have had no luck speaking to the US Department of Energy, and I doubt Rose would have served in the Armed Forces. Could she have participated in some way at the Chicago Pile? If any of your readers know, I would be grateful to hear from them.</p> <p><em>John Murphy<br /> Cheshire, England</em></p> <p><em>Responses to Murphy’s query may be sent via the </em>Magazine<em>. Email <a href="mailto:uchicago-magazine@uchicago.edu">uchicago-magazine@uchicago.edu</a>.</em>—Ed.</p> <h2>Who’s that bluesman?</h2> <p>I believe one of the acts at the <a href="http://photoarchive.lib.uchicago.edu/db.xqy?one=apf7-05986-002.xml">1997 Blues and Ribs</a> (Alumni News, Spring/19) was tenor sax front man Jesse Scinto, AB’94. At the time, Jesse Scinto and the Dignitaries were in rotation at blues clubs around Chicago. I still have and listen to a demo tape from the group. Jesse went on to record an album with blues legend Big Jay McNeely in 2003, The Clutch.</p> <p><em>Noel T. Southall, AB’97, SM’97<br /> Potomac, Maryland</em></p> <h2>Great Lakes mistake</h2> <p>“<a href="https://mag.uchicago.edu/scrc">The Secrets of UChicago’s Special Collections</a>” (Spring/19) pulsed the Chicago drumbeat of studying primary sources, in particular regarding Dr. William Beaumont at Mackinac Island. I look forward to discovering more for a future book.</p> <p>I suppose it appropriate for a geography major to point out Fort Mackinac is between Lake Huron and Lake Michigan, not Lake Superior.</p> <p><em>Paul A. Markun, AB’78<br /> Mill Valley, California</em></p> <p><em>We regret the error and thank Markun for the correction.</em>—Ed.</p> <h2>Behind the book</h2> <p>An addendum to your piece about Claire Hartfield’s (JD’82) books (“History Matters,” Spring/19): I acquired and edited Hartfield’s <em>A Few Red Drops: The Chicago Race Riot of 1919</em>. It was published by Clarion Books/Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, which has been my professional home for the last 30 years.</p> <p><em>Dinah Solomon Stevenson, AB’63, AM’66<br /> Hoboken, New Jersey </em><br />  </p> <h2>Scare tactic</h2> <p>May I suggest that the Magazine’s habit of adding in quotation marks the common shortening of one’s formal first name following the name itself (e.g., William “Bill” Wordsworth; Robert “Bob” Oppenheimer) is at best unnecessary and silly, and at worst pretentious and still silly. If you are following some uniform style code developed within the bowels of the University, its teachings do not seem to be followed by such literary contemporaries as the New York “Times” or the Wall Street “Journal.” If they were U of C alums, would you be writing in your pages about Donald “Don” J. Trump or Lawrence Peter “Yogi” Berra? I suggest you go with one or the other, but not both, and lose the “air quotes.”</p> <p><em>George “Georgie Porgie” Vernon, JD’75, CER’08<br /> Monroe, Wisconsin </em><br />  </p> <p><em>We agree with Vernon that the </em>Magazine<em> has been a bit generous with quotation marks of late and thank him for raising the point. Beginning in the Fall/19 issue, we’ll reserve the use of quotes for nicknames that are not common shortened forms of given names.—</em>Ed.</p> <hr /><p><em>The </em>University of Chicago Magazine <em>welcomes letters about its contents or about the life of the University. Letters for publication must be signed and may be edited for space, clarity, and civility. To provide a range of views and voices, we encourage letter writers to limit themselves to 300 words or fewer. Write: Editor, </em>The University of Chicago Magazine<em>, 5235 South Harper Court, Suite 500, Chicago, IL 60615. Or email: <a href="mailto:uchicago-magazine@uchicago.edu">uchicago-magazine@uchicago.edu</a>.</em></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/university-news" hreflang="en">University News</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-refformats field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/formats/letters" hreflang="en">Letters</a></div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/sum19mail" data-a2a-title="Readers sound off"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Fsum19mail&amp;title=Readers%20sound%20off"></a></span> Fri, 09 Aug 2019 22:17:25 +0000 admin 7159 at https://mag.uchicago.edu House Beautiful editor in chief Elizabeth Gordon, PhB’27, fought for “good” design in the Cold War era https://mag.uchicago.edu/arts-humanities/house-beautiful-editor-chief-elizabeth-gordon-phb27-fought-good-design-cold-war-era <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/19_Summer_Oneil_Glimpses.jpg" width="2000" height="1000" alt="Frank Lloyd Wright and Elizabeth Gordon" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/admin" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">admin</span></span> <span>Fri, 08/09/2019 - 17:17</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Elizabeth Gordon and Frank Lloyd Wright at Taliesin West in Scottsdale, Arizona. Gordon’s attacks on International Style attracted criticism but earned her a lifelong friend in Wright. (Maynard L. Parker, photographer. Courtesy of The Huntington Library, San Marino, California.)</p></div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/brooke-e-oneill-am04"> <a href="/author/brooke-e-oneill-am04"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Brooke E. O’Neill, AM’04</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/university-chicago-magazine" hreflang="en">The University of Chicago Magazine</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item">Summer/19</div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>She made enemies with her attacks on International Style–but a powerful friend in Frank Lloyd Wright.</p></div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Two ways of life stretch before us. One leads to the richness of variety, to comfort and beauty. The other, the one we want to fully expose to you, retreats to poverty and unlivability,” declared <em>House Beautiful</em> editor in chief Elizabeth Gordon, PhB’27, in a controversial 1953 essay, “The Threat to the Next America.”</p> <p>The road to perdition? International Style architecture. For Gordon, an Indiana native who for more than two decades brought her vision of good design to America’s middle-class homemakers, the work of architects such as Ludwig Mies van der Rohe and Le Corbusier was nothing less than an affront to reason.</p> <p>Embracing modular forms, mass-produced industrial materials, and flat glass surfaces, the style had emerged in Europe in the 1920s, and by 1932 was being lauded by curators at New York’s Museum of Modern Art. Gordon took a dimmer view, accusing its architects of shunning comfort, convenience, and functionality, all necessities of home life—a stance that “sparked an instant and enduring controversy,” according to Gordon’s biographer Monica Penick, author of <em>Tastemaker: Elizabeth Gordon, “House Beautiful,” and the Postwar American Home </em>(Yale University Press, 2017).</p> <p>In <em>House Beautiful</em>’s pages, Gordon pulled no punches. “The much-touted all-glass cube of International Style architecture,” she wrote of Mies van der Rohe’s famous Farnsworth House in Plano, Illinois, “is perhaps the most unlivable type of home for man since he descended from the tree and entered a cave. You burn up in the summer and freeze in the winter, because nothing must interfere with the ‘pure’ form of their rectangles—no overhanging roofs to shade you from the sun; the bare minimum of gadgets and possessions so as not to spoil the ‘clean’ look. … No children, no dogs, extremely meager kitchen facilities—nothing human that might disturb the architect’s composition.”</p> <p>Gordon’s blistering words won her critics and admirers alike, most notably Prairie School pioneer and fellow International Style detractor Frank Lloyd Wright, who wired this response: “Surprised and delighted. Did not know you had it in you. From now on at your service.” That message marked the start of a lifelong collaboration. Calling her office “an extension of Taliesin,” after Wright’s design studio, Gordon would go on to produce two special issues celebrating his work and hire a Taliesin apprentice architect as <em>House Beautiful</em>’s architectural editor.</p> <p>While the essay brought Wright and Gordon closer, it prompted much criticism. Architect William Wurster, for example, penned a letter of opposition, cosigned by 30 fellow California designers and sent to several architectural magazines and schools. They rejected the suggestion that modern architects were attempting to “undermine American freedom” and “regret[ted] deeply the attack on European art and architecture … [and] the implication that all ‘good’ art has its roots in America and all that is European is subversive, perverted or sick.” Editor Peter Blake at <em>Architectural Forum</em> was particularly incensed and suspected Gordon had cast a die that would end her career. “Here lies <em>House Beautiful</em>,” he wrote, “scared to death by a chromium chair.”</p> <p><img alt="A cover of House Beautiful featuring a Frank Lloyd Wright home" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="77fc443e-4093-4ebe-8653-1cb9348690f2" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/19_Summer_Oneil_Glimpses_SpotA2_0.png" /></p> <p>The only child in a devout Methodist family, Gordon developed her critic’s eye—and rebellious streak—early. In an unpublished autobiography, she would deride her cluttered, dusty two-story Carpenter Gothic childhood home in Logansport, Indiana, as “best seen from the outside.” As a young woman, Gordon briefly escaped the small farming town, enrolling at Northwestern University for a single semester before her parents forced her to leave because she attended a school dance.</p> <p>A year later she enrolled at the University of Chicago—with her mother accompanying her as a campus chaperone. Much to Gordon’s relief, her mother soon began taking classes and was too engrossed to monitor her daughter’s every move. Exulting in her newfound freedom, Gordon threw herself into her studies and joined the <em>Maroon</em> staff, setting the stage for her future career.</p> <p>After graduating she spent a year teaching high school English in Janesville, Wisconsin, saving enough money to move to New York. In Manhattan she wrote freelance home columns for <em>New York World</em> and the <em>New York Herald Tribune</em> before joining Blaker Advertising Agency, first as a copywriter, then as an account executive. Applying her reporting skills to the growing field of consumer research, Gordon investigated women’s purchasing habits. Her work caught the attention of one of her clients, <em>Good Housekeeping</em>, which hired her to cover building and decorating. Gordon quickly made a name for herself in the field. At age 35, when the editor-in-chief position at <em>House Beautiful </em>opened up, she stepped in.</p> <p>Gordon transformed the magazine into a powerful vehicle for rallying like-minded designers and bringing their work to the average American consumer. Its broad audience included housewives and design professionals who shared an interest in improving domestic life through architecture, interiors, furnishings, and gardening. Under her leadership, the magazine’s readership exploded from 226,304 in 1940 to nearly a million at her retirement in 1964. As one of only a few women leading a mass-circulated publication, Gordon elevated <em>House Beautiful</em> into a serious architectural and commercial influence.</p> <p>“I used <em>House Beautiful</em> as a propaganda and teaching tool—to broaden people’s ‘thinking-and-wanting’ apparatus,” Gordon wrote later. That meant introducing everyday homemakers to concepts such as the California ranch house and climate control through green design.</p> <p>Sporting bold hats and even bolder opinions, Gordon crisscrossed the globe to bring readers what she deemed the best in design. “When she covered a topic, she did it in staggering depth,” Louis Oliver Gropp, a former <em>House Beautiful</em> editor, told the <em>New York Times</em> when Gordon died in 2000. Two special issues introducing traditional minimalist Japanese design to American readers in 1960 reflected five years of research and seven trips to Japan. A later edition dedicated to Scandinavian styles earned her a Finnish knighthood. Her vision of the best in aesthetics and quality focused on craftsmanship and materials, regardless of style or country of origin—a distinction that explains how she could laud, say, the minimalism of Japan while skewering that of the International Style.</p> <p>Writing at the height of the McCarthy era, Gordon borrowed freely from the rhetoric of the times, assailing the International Style’s brand of minimalism as an insidious influence that threatened American life by spreading “something ... rotten” into our homes. For Gordon, the offending style was “clinical” rather than livable and humanistic, two key qualities she sought in “good” design. While she saw the polarizing essay as part of a larger mission to empower consumers with the knowledge needed to create their own beautiful living spaces, its political overtones clearly reinforced a nativism that had taken root in the country.</p> <p>In <em>Tastemaker</em>, Penick argues that Gordon’s “motivations—why she worked so vigorously to discredit a small group of modernists—were complex.” They were, Penick believes, driven at least in part by her professional interests. Being “inextricably tied to the consumption-centric business of American design,” the biographer writes, “the International Style’s minimalism and its lack of storage for household goods was actually a ‘threat’ to her own industry and livelihood.”</p> <p>After leaving her post in 1964, Gordon continued to espouse her views through public lectures and consulting. Though her positions were not universally shared, their influence was indisputable; endorsement letters for Gordon’s honorary membership in the American Institute of Architects noted her years of advocacy and “indefatigable pursuit of good domestic architecture.”</p> <hr /><p><em>Brooke E. O’Neill, AM’04, is a freelance writer in Chicago.</em></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/arts-humanities" hreflang="en">Arts &amp; Humanities</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/architecture" hreflang="en">Architecture</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refformats field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/formats/legacy" hreflang="en">Legacy</a></div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/arts-humanities/house-beautiful-editor-chief-elizabeth-gordon-phb27-fought-good-design-cold-war-era" data-a2a-title="House Beautiful editor in chief Elizabeth Gordon, PhB’27, fought for “good” design in the Cold War era"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Farts-humanities%2Fhouse-beautiful-editor-chief-elizabeth-gordon-phb27-fought-good-design-cold-war-era&amp;title=House%20Beautiful%20editor%20in%20chief%20Elizabeth%20Gordon%2C%20PhB%E2%80%9927%2C%20fought%20for%20%E2%80%9Cgood%E2%80%9D%20design%20in%20the%20Cold%20War%20era"></a></span> Fri, 09 Aug 2019 22:17:25 +0000 admin 7158 at https://mag.uchicago.edu Fertile soil https://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/fertile-soil <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/19_Summer_Demanski_Fertile-soil.jpg" width="1772" height="1300" alt="Oriental Institute lamassu" title="Oriental Institute lamassu" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/admin" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">admin</span></span> <span>Fri, 08/09/2019 - 17:17</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>This sculpture, part of a pair that once guarded the entrance to the throne room of King Sargon II, depicts a protective spirit known as a <em>lamassu</em>—a bull body, a human head, and bird wings. (Photo courtesy the Oriental Institute)</p></div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/laura-demanski-am94"> <a href="/author/laura-demanski-am94"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Laura Demanski, AM’94</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/university-chicago-magazine" hreflang="en">The University of Chicago Magazine</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item">Summer/19</div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>From the seeds first planted by William Rainey Harper and James Henry Breasted, the Oriental Institute blossomed into something rare.</p></div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><em>This article is part of the special feature “<a href="https://mag.uchicago.edu/oi100">The OI at 100</a>,” which commemorates the centennial celebration of the Oriental Institute.</em></p> <hr /><p>In this issue we observe the astonishing century that the <a href="https://oi.uchicago.edu/">Oriental Institute</a> is about to celebrate. The OI was established in 1919 as the University’s first research institute, but its seeds go back further, to 1894, when William Rainey Harper appointed James Henry Breasted to the University of Chicago faculty.</p> <p>Harper, the wunderkind who was the first to lead this University, had crossed paths with Breasted at Yale. The newly minted president had been a professor of ancient Hebrew and the Old Testament there when Breasted attended as a divinity graduate student with a strong interest in Semitic languages and literature.</p> <p>What Breasted set in motion in Chicago would have been hard to foresee when Harper brought to campus the brand-new doctor of Egyptology—the first American so degreed. Twenty-five years down the road, a decade after Harper’s death, the University established the Oriental Institute with a gift from John D. Rockefeller Jr.</p> <p>Moving from its first home in the Haskell Museum to its current location in 1931, the OI thrived. More than in most fields, the assumptions, methods, and real-world contexts of Middle East archaeology changed with the volatile political times and technological leaps of the 20th century and early 21st (see “<a href="https://mag.uchicago.edu/arts-humanities/past-and-future">Past and Future</a>”).</p> <p>The OI’s blossoming, which continues, made the <em>Magazine</em>’s task on this occasion frankly daunting. The world of its research, archaeology, museum, dictionaries, public outreach, and conservation—I could go on—is as vast and rich as the cultures of the region that Breasted was the first to call the Fertile Crescent. In our <a href="https://mag.uchicago.edu/oi100">centennial special section</a> we’ve only scratched the surface of the OI’s past achievements, present work, and future ambitions.</p> <p>Luckily, there are more opportunities to learn—and to participate firsthand. The OI will celebrate its milestone throughout the 2019–20 academic year. To find centennial lectures, films, exhibitions, and more, keep an eye on <a href="https://oi100.uchicago.edu/">oi100.uchicago.edu</a>.</p> <p>Finally, we hope you’ll add your own OI memories to the record (archaeological and/or written). Send them to <a href="mailto:uchicago-magazine@uchicago.edu">uchicago-magazine@uchicago.edu</a>. We’ll share readers’ recollections with the OI and the University Archives, and print a few in the Fall/19 issue.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/university-news" hreflang="en">University News</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/archaeology" hreflang="en">Archaeology</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/middle-east" hreflang="en">Middle East</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/museums" hreflang="en">Museums</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refuchicago field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/oriental-institute" hreflang="en">Oriental Institute</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/oicentennial" hreflang="en">Oriental Institute Centennial</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refformats field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/formats/editors-notes" hreflang="en">Editor&#039;s Notes</a></div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/fertile-soil" data-a2a-title="Fertile soil"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Funiversity-news%2Ffertile-soil&amp;title=Fertile%20soil"></a></span> Fri, 09 Aug 2019 22:17:25 +0000 admin 7157 at https://mag.uchicago.edu Toward a safer world https://mag.uchicago.edu/albright <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/19_Summer_Demanski_CPOST.jpg" width="2000" height="1186" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/admin" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">admin</span></span> <span>Fri, 08/09/2019 - 17:17</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>At the Quadrangle Club, undergraduate and graduate students had an hour to question Madeleine Albright and Chuck Hagel. (Photography by Jason Jones)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/laura-demanski-am94"> <a href="/author/laura-demanski-am94"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Laura Demanski, AM’94</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/university-chicago-magazine" hreflang="en">The University of Chicago Magazine</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item">Summer/19</div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>The first annual Hagel Lecture at UChicago brought together Madeleine Albright and Chuck Hagel to speak to students and the public.</p></div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>“The world’s a mess,” said Madeleine Albright. On this evening late in May, more than 900 people had filled Mandel Hall to hear the former secretary of state and Chuck Hagel talk foreign policy and world politics in the first annual Hagel Lecture, named for the former secretary of defense and Republican senator from Nebraska.</p> <p>The lecture was hosted by the Chicago Project on Security and Threats (CPOST). Introducing the two political heavyweights (who are also good friends) was CPOST’s founder and director, <strong>Robert Pape</strong>, PhD’88. In his remarks, the UChicago political science professor also provided a brief introduction to CPOST, a nonpartisan center that “generates authoritative, advanced knowledge to improve security and prosperity in practical ways.” Gathering and analyzing masses of data, CPOST’s teams of faculty and students aim to answer questions critical to international politics, security, and trade.</p> <p>The project’s origins trace back to Pape’s Suicide Attack Database, begun after 9/11 as a comprehensive record of attacks and attackers. Regularly updated, it remains an essential tool for scholars and government and is one of many ongoing projects based at CPOST today. Among them is Pape’s current collaboration with psychology professor <strong>Jean Decety</strong> to study online terrorist propaganda and recruitment.</p> <p>Another project, led by CPOST associate director <strong>Paul Staniland</strong>, AB’04, associate professor of political science, asks why terrorist groups in South Asia sometimes work against and sometimes in concert with the region’s governments. To answer that question, Staniland’s team is building a database cataloging all instances of and changes in state-insurgent relations in the region since 1945.</p> <p><strong>Benjamin Lessing</strong>, also a political science associate professor and CPOST associate director, studies organized armed violence by gangs and drug cartels in Latin America. The database Lessing’s team is at work on will help them estimate how many people are effectively under criminal governance, including by criminal gangs operating from inside prisons.</p> <p>Data is one sine qua non of CPOST’s work. The other essential, says Pape, is “building real bridges and connections.” That means making CPOST’s data accessible to other scholars and establishing connections to Washington. Reaching out to the broader public is a priority too, and is where the Hagel Lecture comes in.</p> <p>The relationship with the former defense secretary, and others like it, are indispensable to what Pape and CPOST want to achieve. As Albright told the <em>Magazine</em>, a pipeline from the academy to the policy world is “exactly what needs to be happening in terms of putting the intellectual rigor into getting data, and then making it available to government decision makers. … This is a remarkable exercise and very, very useful.” On the other side, Hagel added, “it gives our academic friends some balance and perspective on how policy is made.”</p> <p>At Mandel Hall, Albright kicked off the evening with brief remarks before Pape moderated a conversation between her and Hagel. Pape then invited students in the audience to ask questions about global problems and policies. How to better the messy, dangerous, and endangered world of Albright’s opening comment? The two drew on their own experiences at the highest levels of government to advocate for bipartisanship, diplomacy, and the deep engagement of young people like the evening’s questioners. <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TKtZcMxzkgg">View the entire program.</a></p> <p>That wasn’t the only chance for UChicago students to ask questions that day. A few hours earlier, across University Avenue, two dozen or so graduate students and undergraduates who work with CPOST gathered in the bright, intimate setting of the Quadrangle Club’s second-floor solarium. Exuberant yet businesslike in suits and dresses, they chatted about final exams and papers as they waited for Albright and Hagel to arrive. Following a group photograph, the duo settled in to take questions.</p> <p><em>The following extracts from this session have been edited and condensed.</em></p> <hr /><div class="story-inline-img"> <figure role="group"><img alt="Madeleine Albright and Chuck Hagel" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="a6ec4429-d2b1-4547-a5ae-55d6fcb74542" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/19_Summer_Demanski_Cpost_SpotA.jpg" /><figcaption>Hagel has worked with CPOST for the past few years. “I was appreciative they’d let a poor Nebraska boy” help, he joked. (Photography by Jason Jones)</figcaption></figure></div> <h2>What is your advice for those of us in the younger generation who want to be future policy makers, who may be slightly naive currently but at the same time want to make a better future?</h2> <p><strong>Madeleine Albright</strong> If you are going to enter public service, you have to know your value system and try to figure out how you are going to make your views known. I have students [at Georgetown University, where Albright is a professor of diplomacy] now who are coming to me and saying, “Do you think we should go into this government? We disagree with what they’re doing.” And I say, yes, you should, because there need to be people there who are interested in foreign policy, national security policy, and all the elements of it.</p> <p>I hate to say this to you, but I say to my students that when they first go in, they are not going to be making policy, they’re going to be stamping visas. There’s value in being in the system and learning how it works, and then, as you rise up in it, having the opportunity to state your views clearly and show why you believe in them.</p> <p>I don’t think people should forget what they believe in. National security policy has to be based on values and ideas. What any system needs is to have people with different ideas who are figuring it out— not always saluting and saying, I’m going to do everything that I’m told to do.</p> <p><strong>Chuck Hagel</strong> You always have to remember that our country, our Constitution, our institutions, are much, much bigger than any one individual. We’re all just fleeting stewards of the same.</p> <p>There will be another president, and then another president. Your loyalty is to the country. We all take an oath of office when we enter government. It’s to the Constitution. It’s to our country, it’s to people, America. We don’t take an oath of office stating loyalty to a president, to a political party, or to a philosophy.</p> <p>If you believe you can make a contribution to our country to make it better, that’s where it starts. That’s the fundamental anchor, and then you go from there. I’m often asked, as Madeleine is, by a lot of young people, should I go into politics, should I run for office? And I say, that’s your decision. I can’t tell you if you should do it or not do it. But I would give you this advice, and I think it applies to all things: you’ve got to ask yourself some pretty fundamental questions that only you can answer. The most fundamental is, why do you want to do it? If the answer is not to make a better world, then I tell them, don’t do it. That should be the answer down deep in you.</p> <h2>Is there anything in your tenure that, if you had a chance, you would do differently?</h2> <p><strong>Albright</strong> I second-guess myself about everything. I am often asked if we did the right thing in Kosovo, for instance, or did we do the right thing in expanding NATO. I think it is worth thinking about, and what would have happened if you didn’t do it. Would it have made a difference? In those particular cases I think I came out on the right thing.</p> <p>The one that I find the hardest to deal with happened when I was ambassador at the United Nations, over Rwanda. We did not go in with a peacekeeping operation in Rwanda. I can explain why we didn’t. I won’t take the time to do it, but it made a lot of sense at the time. But given what happened, I think it would have made a big difference to go in.</p> <p>Usually you’re not the only person making the decision, especially a big one. It comes as a result of a principals meeting or an interagency meeting of some kind. Then the question is more like, should I resign over that? You do go over things, there’s no question. If you don’t, then you shouldn’t have the job. It’s worth analyzing why you did it, especially if it doesn’t have a happy ending or it’s a difficult issue. Asking yourself about do-overs is an essential part of a decision-making process.</p> <p><strong>Hagel</strong> I agree with everything Secretary Albright said. You can second-guess yourself into paralysis, and you can talk yourself into anything. Now, you should always be second-guessing yourself—not to paralysis, but you’ve got to come at it from all the different perspectives: Is this the right thing? Why isn’t it? Go back and review it. That’s part of a process that I’ve tried to maintain in every job I’ve had. Take inventory. If you’re doing that honestly with yourself, then you’ll come to the right decision on almost everything. There are situations where I could have done something better, I should have said it differently, I should have said it better, maybe made a better decision. But you build on those experiences and learn from them, and hopefully you get better.</p> <div class="story-inline-img"> <figure role="group"><img alt="Madeleine Albright" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="5bb5c913-b3bd-4a16-9a20-5f31a11f4d49" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/19_Summer_Demanski_Cpost_SpotB.jpg" /><figcaption>Albright wore a pin depicting the Chicago skyline for the occasion. (Photography by Jason Jones)</figcaption></figure></div> <h2>How does cooperation between the State Department and the Department of Defense play out, and how can diplomatic solutions still play into an evolving security situation when you do need stronger military forces on the ground, as in Syria?</h2> <p><strong>Albright</strong> In a course I teach called The National Security Toolbox, I say foreign policy is just trying to get somebody to do what you want. That’s all it is. So what are the tools? We are the most powerful country in the world, but there are not a lot of tools in the toolbox. There’s diplomacy, bilateral and multilateral; economic tools of aid and trade and sanctions; the threat of the use of force; the use of force; intelligence; and law enforcement. That’s it.</p> <p>The reason I started teaching the course is that I remember what it was like in the Carter administration when the Soviets invaded Afghanistan. We had an interagency meeting and it was insane. We knew we couldn’t get the Soviets out, but we were trying to figure out how to punish them. So it was like show-and-tell, saying, well, we can cut off their fishing rights or we’ll have a grain embargo or we’ll have a call-up of the draft. Ultimately somebody said, we’re not sending our athletes to the Olympics. I thought, this is the most disorganized way of trying to figure out how to do this.</p> <p>The toolbox is what’s discussed in these meetings. Diplomacy is the bread-and-butter of things, but it’s viewed as weak. Sometimes force is used at the end, because it’s strong. And an awful lot of times you use economic tools. But the discussion is often ultimately about the relationship between state and defense.</p> <p>I’ll never forget this: I was outside the Situation Room standing with General [John] Shalikashvili, who was chairman of the Joint Chiefs at the time, and [Robert] Rubin, secretary of the treasury, walked by and he said, “Aha: force and diplomacy.” Shali said, “And which is which?” Because I was more inclined to use force, and he was inclined to use diplomacy. I do often think that the State Department is more prepared to use force than the Defense Department.</p> <p><strong>Hagel</strong> In almost every case the military should be used only if there’s a diplomatic agenda. Now, if America is attacked, that’s different. But when you use your military, you want to use it with as much precision as you can. It should follow the ultimate objective, and that’s got to be led by the State Department, in conjunction with the White House and the president. Ultimately, where does the president want to go with this? What does the president want to accomplish?</p> <p>The relationship between a secretary of state and secretary of defense is important to make it all work. When I was secretary of defense, [Secretary of State John] Kerry and I would meet once a week. That was very helpful. We could clear our own thinking with each other, and then we would meet when everybody was in town once a week with the national security adviser. The interests of all three don’t always come together, but Kerry and I had a relationship where he never surprised me, I never surprised him, and that was really important.</p> <h2>What are the current challenges of dealing with the Middle East, especially in situations where national security interests dictate what the United States does?</h2> <p><strong>Albright</strong> I think we don’t fully understand all of the complications of the Middle East. In addition to artificial countries having been created, most Americans don’t know much about Islam, much less the difference between Shia and Sunni. And they don’t focus on the centuries-old struggle between Arabs and Persians and that complicated aspect of it.</p> <p>The issue is always whether American foreign policy is idealistic or realistic. That’s a false dichotomy. I never could figure out if I was an idealistic<br /> realist or a realistic idealist. You need both. And as hard as it is to say, especially to young people, our policy is inconsistent because we look at various countries and realize we need them for X.</p> <p>My problem at the moment would be Saudi Arabia. They have, from everything that one can tell, committed murder on the orders of the highest echelon. On the other hand, I think it’s very important to have relations with Saudi Arabia. I personally would not sell them arms at this moment, especially with what’s going on in Yemen and the Houthi, but I think it’s crazy to break off relations.</p> <p>So one makes certain allowances for having a pragmatic relationship. When I was in office, I always believed in the pragmatic, but I never gave up on human rights. No matter where I was, talking about whatever, especially in China, I would say, you know, you’ve got to do something about your human rights policy. We need to do both.</p> <p><strong>Hagel</strong> Every nation always responds in its own self-interest, and its foreign policy is conducted on that basis. At the same time, as Madeleine mentioned, there’s always a struggle between the idealism and realism in the principle of foreign policy. The principle, I’ve always thought, is a foreign policy that includes our self-interests, that has a strong defense of human rights, liberty, values, and that melds that with the reality of an imperfect world and the imperfections of what the Middle East represents: unfortunately, authoritarian governments.</p> <p>As for Madeleine’s mentioning of Saudi Arabia, that’s exactly where I am too. We couldn’t walk away from that relationship, because there’s too much at risk. But there are things we can do. The Congress did pass a law not allowing funding for the Yemen war, but the president vetoed that.</p> <p>The essence of diplomacy is finding smart, realistic—but yet as idealistic as we can—ways to solve problems. If you give away the idealism of your foreign policy, and if that’s seen by other countries as walking away from it, then this world is in for a real tough time.</p> <p>We are seeing more and more of a drive toward authoritarianism in the world. Xi [Jinping] probably is a master, with as much power as any Chinese leader since Mao [Zedong]. Obviously [Vladimir] Putin, [Recep Tayyip] Erdoğan in Turkey. You’re looking at Western democracies in Europe, like Hungary and Poland, that are moving in those directions.</p> <p>We have been the one country that more than any other has stood for values and tried to implement idealism and “let’s do this right.” Now, we’re more powerful. We’ve got more authority. Maybe you could say, well, that’s our responsibility. But it’s easy to forfeit that too.</p> <p>I’ll give you one example. I was secretary of defense when the president of Egypt was overthrown in a military coup by [Abdel Fatteh el-] Sisi. I’d been in Egypt a month before that, and we met with the president and Sisi, who was defense minister at the time. I remember the National Security Council meeting with the president [after the coup]. A lot of the conversation was, let’s pull the plug on Egypt and Sisi. I was, I think, the only voice that said, we’re going to have to do something to respond to this, but let’s think this through. When you say, “pull the plug,” what do you mean? They wanted to cut off everything—everything. I remember turning to President Obama and saying, “Mr. President, if we do that, we have just lost any influence and any instrument of influence we might have left in Egypt. Plus the Suez Canal.”</p> <p>As you start thinking about the consequences of that action, it’s a difficult situation always, and there are never any good options that the secretary of state has to work through. Probably the same as the secretary of defense. But I think the secretary of state has more bad options that come to him or her than anybody in the cabinet, because they wouldn’t come to her if it was good news. Figure it out, Madame Secretary.</p> <p><strong>Albright</strong> It’s still a pretty good job.</p> <p><strong>Hagel</strong> No, there are some privileges to that. So, anyway, that’s the way I’ve always seen it, and I’ve seen it up close.</p> <div class="story-inline-img"> <figure role="group"><img alt="Students with Madeleine Albright and Chuck Hagel" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="d154594a-a1ed-4527-b524-e6453c2f9203" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/19_Summer_Demanski_Cpost_SpotC.jpg" /><figcaption>(Photography by Jason Jones)</figcaption></figure></div> <h2>With the decline and recession of diplomacy, I’m interested in the two principles of the stick and the carrot [defense and state]. How do you get those parts of our government to talk to each other and to work together in an interagency process?</h2> <p><b>ALBRIGHT </b>Well, it’s frankly one of the hardest parts. The US government makes thousands of decisions a day. Some of them are done within an individual department, but more and more they require an interagency approach. </p> <p>The hard part is, who’s the boss of the interagency process? That isn’t a problem at the top, where the national security adviser brings people together. But as you get up there, there are questions to whether the Defense Department takes the decision or the State Department. And these days it takes more and more departments. Now you have to involve commerce and treasury and health and human services.</p> <p>I was a National Security Council [NSC] staffer in the Carter administration, and there’s nothing more invigorating than going into a meeting, and they know you’re the NSC and you say, “The president wants,” and then you kind of take charge of the interagency process. On the other hand, the NSC staff is basically parasitic: they depend on the other parts of the government to provide information, and so it’s, I’m in charge, but tell me what you know.</p> <p>At the top, the national security adviser summons the meeting. Then it’s important to, what I would say is, break the eggs: make sure that each secretary gets a chance to speak, and with any luck to actually disagree, because I think it’s important to have different views. Then it’s up to the national security adviser to make an omelet out of it to give to the president. If you can’t make an omelet, then you give the egg mess to the president and make your arguments in front of the president. </p> <p>The other part is to understand what is wrong with your argument, so that if people disagree with you within the interagency process, you can defend what you decide to do. </p> <p><b>HAGEL </b>The interagency process in our government reflects the reality of the interconnectedness of the world: security, intelligence, the economy, diplomacy, trade. They’re all intertwined.</p> <p>I would add that it’s really important that the president of the United States set the tone as to how he wants that interagency process to work. When I was secretary of defense, it worked pretty well. The principals, the secretaries of state, defense, treasury, and others for the most part had personal relationships.</p> <p>That doesn’t always have to happen, but it helps, because, as Madeleine said, it’s people that have to make it work. If you’ve got trust and confidence in each other and you’re not worried about somebody pulling something on you or not being honest, that’s really important. But the president is the one that assures that doesn’t happen.</p> <h2>How did you deal with disagreements with what you thought was the right choice if the president pushed back?</h2> <p><b>HAGEL</b> When the president and I disagreed on something, my approach always was to be very straight about it, and I think the president was very straight with me. There were issues that we had differences of opinion on. You serve at the pleasure of the president. It’s clear there’s one boss. But as long as you can articulately make your case as to why you think you’re right or why whatever it is is a bad decision, that’s the best you can do. I think you owe that to a president if you think it’s the wrong direction.</p> <p>Madeleine, I know, feels the same way. But all you can do is your best and give your best and most honest judgment, and then ultimately the decision is the president’s to make.</p> <p><b>ALBRIGHT</b> There are disagreements, and if there weren’t disagreements, we’d be living in a totalitarian society. The reason that you have this process is to hear different opinions.</p> <p>And I think they’re fine so long as they are inside. One thing that frankly does happen, and you don’t know why, is somebody leaks that there was a disagreement. Or the press will call somebody and say, “I hear you quite didn’t like that discussion,” and then you think, well, I have to say I did. </p> <p>Let’s take, for instance, some of the decisions on Iraq. From what one sees now, Secretary of State Colin Powell disagreed with some of the issues, but it wasn’t clear until afterward. It was not out there. </p> <p>I know what President Bill Clinton would do. We would be in meetings, and he’d say, “Do you all agree? I want to hear what Madeleine has to say,” or whatever, because we were chosen for our competence in the job we were doing, and the strength we had to defend the arguments we made. One of the things that I tell my students is it’s important to know why you think something, and what is wrong with what you’re arguing. What are the counterarguments to what you’re proposing?</p> <h2>What are some foreign policy issues that you believe this next generation of policy makers will face?</h2> <p><b>HAGEL</b> Our world now, and what you’re going to be facing and leading, is interconnected. Everything is interconnected. That means you’re going to have to widen your aperture more than I had to widen mine to deal with the big issues coming.</p> <p>What are those big issues? Well, our demographers tell us by 2050 we’re going to have nine billion people. Just start with that. That means climate is huge. It affects everything, everybody—food production, health, security, and so on. That will be as big an issue overall as you’ll be able to deal with, because it’s everything. Obviously, the nuclear issue will unfortunately still be with us. There’s always been some form of terrorism in the world. That’s not new. </p> <p>All the more reason why Madeleine’s old job, diplomacy, is going to be really critical. We’ve got to get along with people. We have to have alliances. We have to be able to rely on friends and allies. And we’ve done that pretty well since World War II. </p> <p>We can’t go it alone. We’re not that good, we’re not that smart. No country can go it alone. We have to rely on other countries to allow us to base there and keep troops there. It’s in their interest as well, but certainly it’s in our interest.</p> <p>All these alliances that are so critical need to be adapted and adjusted to new technologies, new opportunities, new challenges, always. That’s going to be a big part of what you’re going to be dealing with. Technology is driving this faster than anybody would have ever predicted. </p> <p>And I’d say that’s the last point, managing the good—and managing the challenges and managing evil. There’s still evil in this world. I suspect there will continue to be evil, I’m sorry to say, but how do you manage that? We can’t do it alone. </p> <p><b>ALBRIGHT</b> I agree. I’m known as Multilateral Madeleine. The bottom line is partnerships and trying to develop those. The thing that I absolutely insist on now when I teach is to be able to put yourself into the other person’s shoes, the other country’s shoes. You can’t be involved in anything that is a zero-sum game. There is no such thing as zero-sum. It’s important to have that wider look to see what the other side needs. That is what diplomacy is about.</p> <hr /><p>CPOST researchers will appear on a September 26, 2019, live broadcast of <a href="http://freakonomics.com/live/"><em>Freakonomics</em> <em>Radio Live! </em></a>at Chicago’s Harris Theater with Stephen J. Dubner and UChicago economics professor Steven D. Levitt.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/law-policy-society" hreflang="en">Law, Policy &amp; Society</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/politics" hreflang="en">Politics</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refuchicago field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/1588" hreflang="en">Chicago Project on Security and Threats</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/1589" hreflang="en">CPOST</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/1590" hreflang="en">Hagel Lecture</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refformats field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/formats/marketplace-ideas" hreflang="en">Marketplace of Ideas</a></div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/albright" data-a2a-title="Toward a safer world"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Falbright&amp;title=Toward%20a%20safer%20world"></a></span> Fri, 09 Aug 2019 22:17:25 +0000 admin 7156 at https://mag.uchicago.edu Hermit philosophy https://mag.uchicago.edu/arts-humanities/hermit-philosophy <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/19_Summer_Mcgranahan_Hermit.jpg" width="2000" height="1000" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/admin" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">admin</span></span> <span>Fri, 08/09/2019 - 17:17</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Visitors take in the <em>Hutopia</em> exhibition at the Neubauer Collegium. (Photography by Robert Heishman)</p></div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/lucas-mcgranahan"> <a href="/author/lucas-mcgranahan"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Lucas McGranahan</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/university-chicago-magazine" hreflang="en">The University of Chicago Magazine</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item">Summer/19</div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Dieter Roelstraete’s course explored exile, retreat, and homes away from home.</p></div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Those of you who think that we’re actually going to build a hut, I’ll have to disappoint,” <a href="https://arthistory.uchicago.edu/index.php/faculty/profiles/roelstraete"><strong>Dieter Roelstraete</strong></a> tells the 12 or so students who have arrived at the Cochrane-Woods Art Center on Monday, April 1, for the first day of A Curating Case-Study: The Hut. When one student points out that a construction project was mentioned in the course description, Roelstraete wryly informs her that it will be “spiritual construction work,” adding, “We’re not going to build a hut, because I wouldn’t know how to hold a hammer.”</p> <p>A tall bearded man with a hard-to-pin-down Continental accent (Belgium!), Roelstraete is the curator at the <a href="https://neubauercollegium.uchicago.edu/">Neubauer Collegium for Culture and Society</a>. He designed the course as a companion to an exhibition he is curating at the Collegium through September 6. Titled <a href="https://neubauercollegium.uchicago.edu/exhibitions/current_exhibition/"><em>Hutopia</em></a>, it features models of the real or imagined retreats (“huts”) of three giants of 20th-century philosophy: Ludwig Wittgenstein, Martin Heidegger, and Theodor Adorno. Hutopia follows up Roelstraete’s 2018 exhibition in Venice, <em><a href="http://www.fondazioneprada.org/project/machines-a-penser/?lang=en">Machines à penser</a> </em>(“machines for thinking”), and it asks the same question: How do our living spaces shape our thinking?</p> <p>It’s an idiosyncratic course—what Roelstraete calls “an art-meets-philosophy course in the architectural context of a hut”—and the students are an eclectic group as well. About half are graduate students. When Roelstraete asks for introductions, they list fields including art history and philosophy but also social work, neuroscience, and molecular engineering. If a classroom is a machine for thinking, this one has an interesting set of moving parts.</p> <p>That Roelstraete likes to introduce topics by testing the students’ knowledge (Who recognizes this building? Who has read Adorno?) might seem intimidating if he were not also, disarmingly, a big fan of birthdays. He opened the class by projecting an image of 19th-century French writer Joseph de<br /> Maistre—because it’s his birthday. “Every morning I wake up—whose birthday is it today?” he told the students.</p> <p>Who is this hutty professor?</p> <div class="story-inline-img"> <figure role="group"><img alt="Illustration of Dieter Roelstraete" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="238b98e1-2ea4-406b-9035-fa9c3d083ac3" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/19_Summer_Mcgranahan_Hermit_SpotA.gif" /><figcaption><strong>(Illustration by Daniel Hertzberg)</strong></figcaption></figure></div> <p>Roelstraete explains that, before joining the Neubauer Collegium two years ago, he worked on the curatorial team of <em>Documenta</em>, an exhibition of international contemporary art held every five years in Kassel, Germany. Prior to that, he was a curator at institutions including the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago. Teaching is newer to Roelstraete than curating; he is up front with the class that it is only his second time teaching a formal academic course, saying that it will be an “experimental enterprise.”</p> <p>He begins by walking the class through the lives, works, and housing preferences of the course’s three philosophers. Going by birth order (obviously), he first discusses Wittgenstein, the neurotic Austrian polymath who, upon becoming obsessed with a logical paradox, abandoned his career as an aeronautical engineer, came under Bertrand Russell’s tutelage, and retreated to a cabin at the edge of a Norwegian fjord to attempt to solve all philosophical problems through logical clarification. One early result of this effort was the 1921 work <em>Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus</em>, whose mysterious passage 6.44 is cited in a tattoo on Roelstraete’s left shoulder. (He mentions his ink but doesn’t show it.) The passage reads, “Not how the world is, is the mystical, but that it is.”</p> <p>Roelstraete turns to Heidegger by projecting a 1933 or 1934 image of the German philosopher, who sits unsmiling before a wall of books and averts his eyes from the camera. “So what do you think is the punctum here?” he asks the class, explaining Roland Barthes’s term for a striking detail that establishes a connection with the viewer. “The mustache?” a male student guesses. “Good, close,” Roelstraete responds. Heidegger’s dark, short mustache may call to mind the ascent of Adolf Hitler and the Nazis at that time in Germany, but it is the philosopher’s lapel pin—with a Nazi eagle insignia—that Roelstraete sees as crucial. Notoriously, Heidegger was the most prominent German intellectual to align himself with the Third Reich, something for which he never publicly apologized.</p> <div class="story-inline-img"> <figure role="group"><img alt="Sculpture/Planter of Heidegger" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="d6cb1d37-7aa6-4517-b3e1-7be131d634fe" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/19_Summer_Mcgranahan_Hermit_SpotB.jpg" /><figcaption>Heidegger sprouts some fresh ideas in a sculpture by London-based Polish artist Goshka Macuga. (Photography by Robert Heishman)</figcaption></figure></div> <p>Heidegger had a small ski hut built in his native Black Forest region, where he worked on his 1927 magnum opus, <em>Being and Time</em>, and returned throughout his life. If Wittgenstein’s hut was for escaping home—especially the distractions of his wealthy upbringing and bourgeois academic career—Heidegger’s hut was for feeling at home. He even claimed in a 1934 essay that his philosophy belongs to the Black Forest inextricably, much as the work of its peasant farmers does. Such rhetoric raises deep questions for the course. How does love of hut and homeland, not to mention fatherland, shape one’s philosophy, or possibly taint it?</p> <p>As for Adorno’s hut, it doesn’t exist. Or rather, it exists only as a sculpture, <em>Adorno’s Hut</em>, by late Scottish artist Ian Hamilton Finlay (the father of <em>Hutopia</em> artist Alec Finlay). Roelstraete takes this abstract doghouse-size structure to be a kind of visual joke, since the leftist cosmopolitan Adorno—who once dedicated an entire book to criticizing Heideggerian ideas about authenticity—was “the last philosopher in the world who would be caught dead in a hut.”</p> <p>Roelstraete projects an image of the white two-story Los Angeles house where Adorno lived in the 1940s, not far from other Weimar-era German exiles such as Bertolt Brecht and Arnold Schoenberg. Adorno, like Wittgenstein, came from an assimilated partially Jewish family and had to flee Nazi rule. Thus, Adorno’s home in LA, if not a hut, was still a retreat.</p> <p>Class wraps up with a trip to the Neubauer Collegium on the corner of 57th Street and Woodlawn Avenue. Here the students see Roelstraete’s exhibit <em>Kleine Welt</em>, which ponders how specific artworks—by Paul Klee especially—have become ubiquitous on academic book jackets. That exhibition will soon make way for Hutopia. Outside, Chicago artist <strong>John Preus</strong>, MFA’05, has already completed a half-size model of Wittgenstein’s cabin on the patio.</p> <p>Roelstraete and his class walk the few blocks back to the Cochrane-Woods Art Center and wrap up for the day. The students exit the room that will be their hut for the quarter—a hut for reflecting on huts—and make their way to their next classes, their homes, and their homes away from home.</p> <h2>Syllabus</h2> <p>A Curating Case-Study: The Hut (ARTV 20012/30012; ARTH 26790/36790) was open to undergraduates and graduate students and met once a week, whether in a classroom, a hut, a cemetery.</p> <p>Students read works by Wittgenstein, Heidegger, and Adorno; gave group presentations on the philosophers’ lives and works; and visited <em>Hutopia </em>for its opening on April 25 (the eve of Wittgenstein’s 125th birthday, Roelstraete pointed out in his welcoming remarks). They completed a final project of spiritual construction work in the form of a philosophical guide to the hut of their dreams.</p> <hr /><p><strong>Read more in the web exclusive “<a href="https://mag.uchicago.edu/hut">Head Space</a>” and “<a href="https://mag.uchicago.edu/arts-humanities/hut-ones-own">A Hut of One's Own</a>” from the Summer/19 <em>Core</em>.</strong></p> <hr /></div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/arts-humanities" hreflang="en">Arts &amp; Humanities</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/arts" hreflang="en">Arts</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/philosophy" hreflang="en">Philosophy</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/architecture" hreflang="en">Architecture</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refuchicago field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/neubauer-collegium-culture-and-society-0" hreflang="en">Neubauer Collegium for Culture and Society</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/uchicago-arts" hreflang="en">UChicago Arts</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refformats field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/formats/course-work" hreflang="en">Course work</a></div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/arts-humanities/hermit-philosophy" data-a2a-title="Hermit philosophy"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Farts-humanities%2Fhermit-philosophy&amp;title=Hermit%20philosophy"></a></span> Fri, 09 Aug 2019 22:17:25 +0000 admin 7155 at https://mag.uchicago.edu After 40 years representing Hyde Park’s district in the Illinois House, a veteran lawmaker steps aside https://mag.uchicago.edu/law-policy-society/after-40-years-representing-hyde-parks-district-illinois-house-veteran-lawmaker <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/19_Summer_Chung_Local-Interest.jpg" width="2000" height="1000" alt="Barbara Flynn Currie" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/admin" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">admin</span></span> <span>Fri, 08/09/2019 - 17:17</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Barbara Flynn Currie, LAB’58, AB’68, AM’73, at the Illinois State Capitol in 2013. (AP Photo/Seth Perlman)</p></div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/jeanie-chung"> <a href="/author/jeanie-chung"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Jeanie Chung</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/university-chicago-magazine" hreflang="en">The University of Chicago Magazine</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item">Summer/19</div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Barbara Flynn Currie, LAB’58, AB’68, AM’73, helped pave the way for other female politicians in the Prairie State.</p></div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>If a single day could be said to have spanned the spectrum of <strong>Barbara Flynn Currie</strong>’s experience as an elected official, it might have been December 15, 2008. At 10 a.m., as a member of the Electoral College, she cast her ballot for Barack Obama, who once served alongside her in the Illinois legislature. Two hours later she announced an impeachment investigation into then-governor Rod Blagojevich by an Illinois House panel, which she would lead. (He was later removed from office and convicted on federal corruption charges.)</p> <p>“It was the high and the low,” she says.</p> <p>During her 40 years in the Illinois House of Representatives, Currie, LAB’58, AB’68, AM’73, saw numerous highs, weathered some lows, and crossed paths with every significant political figure in the state. She served with six governors before retiring this past January, and will continue to draw on her political expertise as a member of Illinois’s Pollution Control Board, to which she was appointed in April by Governor J. B. Pritzker.</p> <p>As House majority leader for more than 20 years, she helped pass bills establishing a state earned income tax credit, outlawing the death penalty, and legalizing gay marriage.</p> <p>Quite a run for someone who fell into a political career almost by chance.</p> <p>Currie grew up mostly in Hyde Park; her father, Frank Flynn, PhD’49, taught in the School of Social Service Administration. She enrolled at UChicago in 1958 but left in 1959 and married David P. Currie, AB’57, later the Edward H. Levi Distinguished Service Professor in the Law School until his death in 2007.</p> <p>Between David’s last year of law school at Harvard and clerkships, including one for Supreme Court justice Felix Frankfurter, the couple didn’t return to Chicago until 1962, when David began teaching at the University. By then they had a two-year-old son, Stephen, who was soon joined by a daughter, Margaret.</p> <p>“So I did finally finish college,” Currie says, “but slowly, on the motherhood plan.”</p> <p>Although she followed her undergraduate degree at UChicago with a master’s in political science, Currie wasn’t interested in an academic career. She was politically active—the Flynn family had always talked about current events around the dinner table—but never considered running for anything.</p> <p>Then one day in 1978, she ran into Chicago attorney and activist <strong>Michael Shakman</strong>, AB’62, AM’64, JD’66. Bob Mann, who represented the 24th District in the Illinois House, had recently announced his retirement. Currie asked Shakman, whose campaign she had worked on when he ran for constitutional convention delegate, whether he planned to run for Mann’s seat.</p> <p>“No,” he said. “Why don’t you?”</p> <p>“I grew up in the benighted 1950s,” says Currie, “when there weren’t very many women in public office, and those who were generally inherited the job.” But her children were nearly grown, and after consulting with family and with friends in local politics, she says, “we decided to go for it.”</p> <p>She won, “though not real handily,” and entered a new world.</p> <p>At the time women made up just 13 percent of the Illinois General Assembly, but “there were enough of us to make people feel as if they had a responsibility to be doing good things for women.” She remembers male legislators who would cite their support of a specific domestic violence bill while refusing to support the Equal Rights Amendment.</p> <p>But she also found strong support networks. The bipartisan Conference of Women Legislators began the year she came to Springfield, giving new legislators like Currie a forum to try out their first bills, “so you could go through the ropes without people laughing at you, or get your arguments organized before you actually turned up in a real committee hearing.”</p> <p>She also noticed that male legislators seemed relieved to let her and other women take the lead on bills addressing sexual harassment, maternity leave, and other so-called women’s issues, about which Currie was passionate. “People were really helpful with figuring out what legislation I might be interested in,” she says, “but it was also fair to say that they were delighted to get rid of the ‘girl bills’ when they saw the girl.”</p> <p>Currie was known for her diligent preparation to present a bill—a habit she acquired at UChicago. “You did learn to establish arguments for and against your position. And to me that was extremely valuable.”</p> <p>She enjoyed the preparation but also found it necessary. Every legislator wields a different type of power, she believes. When she started, most women in the legislature did not enjoy the power of strong financial backing or party support. That’s still the case for many. “What we have is knowledge,” she says. “We know the bills, we know the issues, we know how to make a case.”</p> <p>When Currie became House majority leader in 1997, women made up just 26 percent of the Illinois General Assembly as a whole. The reaction of women in the capitol—across party lines—was unanimous, “whether they were secretaries, lobbyists, or whatever,” Currie says. “They could not have been more pleased with the fact that one of us made it. Because if one of us makes it, we all do.”</p> <p>As majority leader, Currie was responsible for getting bills passed—not always exciting work. Most legislation concerns what Currie calls “bread-and-butter” issues that affect a specific interest group and simply involve working with that group to drum up support among legislators.</p> <p>Horse-trading, in which legislators agree to support each other’s bills, does happen for these bread-and-butter bills, but it is relatively rare on big issues like gay marriage or the death penalty. “They’re issues you really believe in or you really don’t,” Currie says.</p> <p>Passing significant legislation can, however, require time and grassroots activity to build the political will of legislators to support it. She remembers a failed bill she sponsored in the early 1990s to fund needle exchanges for intravenous drug users. One downstate Republican told her that the idea made perfect sense, but he couldn’t vote for it because he could never explain it at home. “In a way, he was right,” Currie says. “He probably couldn’t explain it at home.”</p> <p>A few months into her retirement, Currie hopes to be remembered for her honesty, fair-mindedness, and ability to see other perspectives. <strong>Christian Mitchell</strong>, AB’08, a former representative of Illinois’s 26th District who’s now a deputy governor of Illinois, used to drive Currie back to Chicago from Springfield legislative sessions. He considers her “the smartest person I’ve ever met in my life”—and one with a sense of humor. “Even in the most difficult floor debate, while someone is hurling invective at her,” Mitchell says, “she’d smile and disarm the person with her amazing wit.”</p> <p>In turn, Mitchell and the newest group of incoming legislators make Currie hopeful for the future of politics, even as she laments the current climate of polarization.</p> <p>“I would never have been in politics all these years,” she says, “if I had not been an optimist.”</p> <hr /><h2>MILESTONES</h2> <p><strong>1978</strong><br /> Elected to the Illi-nois House’s 24th District, becoming one of just 23 women in the 177-member General Assembly.</p> <p><strong>1985</strong><br /> Helps pass the Educational Reform Act, a comprehensive funding package providing state-funded preschool, full-day kindergarten, and more.</p> <p><strong>1997</strong><br /> Becomes the first woman to serve as Illinois House majority leader.</p> <p><strong>2000</strong><br /> Along with then– state senator Barack Obama, cosponsors a bill establishing the state earned income tax credit.</p> <p><strong>2008</strong><br /> Chairs the Illinois House committee to investigate then-governor Rod Blagojevich on corruption charges.</p> <p><strong>2011</strong><br /> Cosponsors HB5687, outlawing the death penalty in Illinois.</p> <p><strong>2013</strong><br /> Cosponsors HB5170, legalizing gay marriage in Illinois.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/law-policy-society" hreflang="en">Law, Policy &amp; Society</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/politics" hreflang="en">Politics</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refuchicago field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/hyde-park" hreflang="en">Hyde Park</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/college-alumni" hreflang="en">College alumni</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/graduate-alumni" hreflang="en">Graduate alumni</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refformats field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/formats/c-vitae" hreflang="en">C Vitae</a></div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/law-policy-society/after-40-years-representing-hyde-parks-district-illinois-house-veteran-lawmaker" data-a2a-title="After 40 years representing Hyde Park’s district in the Illinois House, a veteran lawmaker steps aside"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Flaw-policy-society%2Fafter-40-years-representing-hyde-parks-district-illinois-house-veteran-lawmaker&amp;title=After%2040%20years%20representing%20Hyde%20Park%E2%80%99s%20district%20in%20the%20Illinois%20House%2C%20a%20veteran%20lawmaker%20steps%20aside"></a></span> Fri, 09 Aug 2019 22:17:25 +0000 admin 7154 at https://mag.uchicago.edu Releases https://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/releases-37 <span><span lang="" about="/profile/admin" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">admin</span></span> <span>Fri, 08/09/2019 - 17:17</span> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/andrew-peart-am16-phd18"> <a href="/author/andrew-peart-am16-phd18"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Andrew Peart, AMʼ16, PhDʼ18</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/university-chicago-magazine" hreflang="en">The University of Chicago Magazine</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item">Summer/19</div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>A selection of books, films, and recordings by UChicago alumni.</p></div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><h2>They Played the Game: Memories from 47 Major Leaguers</h2> <p><strong>Norman L. Macht, PhB’47</strong></p> <p>Red Schoendienst was “smart, did things that don’t ever show up in the box scores,” as power-hitting Milwaukee Braves first baseman Joe Adcock remembers his 1950s teammate. The same goes for many of the players who figure as storytellers or subjects in this collection of oral histories from baseball historian <strong>Norman L. Macht</strong>. Gathering more than three decades’ worth of interviews, Macht’s collection covers the game from 1912 to 1981 and captures stories the records don’t tell, with Hall of Famers like Ted Williams sharing memories alongside Adcock, Harvey Haddix, and other lesser-known stars.</p> <h2>Art for People’s Sake: Artists and Community in Black Chicago, 1965–1975</h2> <p><strong>Rebecca Zorach, AM’94, PhD’99</strong></p> <p>Extensively illustrated with artworks, archival photographs, and other documents, this book chronicles the achievements of visual artists associated with the Black Arts Movement in Chicago. Northwestern University art historian <strong>Rebecca Zorach</strong> highlights painter Jeff Donaldson, printmaker Barbara Jones-Hogu, and filmmaker DeWitt Beall, along with such groups as the Organization of Black American Culture (OBAC), the African Commune of Bad Relevant Artists (AFRICOBRA), and Art &amp; Soul, examining their vision of a black community united across class divisions by art.</p> <h2>The Rationing: A Novel</h2> <p><strong>Charles Wheelan, PhD’98</strong></p> <p>The US government was prepared for an epidemic. Then a biomedical contractor’s cost-saving schemes decimated the national stockpile of Dormigen, a cure-all drug. To avoid rationing the available supply, can the government rely on cooperation among a variety of actors—congressional lawmakers, diplomats, the National Institutes of Health—for an effective course of action? Set in the near future, this political satire by Dartmouth College public policy senior lecturer <strong>Charles Wheelan</strong> gives control of the narrative to a fictional NIH scientist with a dual PhD in microbiology and public health from the University of Chicago.</p> <h2>1919</h2> <p><strong>Eve L. Ewing, AB’08</strong></p> <p>This second full-length poetry collection by <strong>Eve L. Ewing</strong>, assistant professor in the School of Social Service Administration, examines the 1919 Chicago race riot, which began with the killing of a black teenager named Eugene Williams. Inspired by a 1922 state government–commissioned report, Ewing’s poems embrace the idea that understanding the riot means comprehending everyday life for the era’s black Chicagoans. Built to be “what-if machines” and “time-traveling devices,” according to Ewing, the poems shift scale and perspective by shifting among forms—dramatic monologues, biblical adaptations, even a jump-rope rhyme—as they probe the human reality of events before, during, and after the riot. For more about Ewing, see <a href="https://mag.uchicago.edu/law-policy-society/eve-l-ewing-ab08">the UChicagoan</a>.</p> <h2>Ensemble-Made Chicago: A Guide to Devised Theater</h2> <p><strong>Chloe Johnston, AB’99</strong></p> <p>An ensemble-made, or devised, theatrical production can be ephemeral: it starts with a group’s improvised performance, not with a playwright’s script. So when it’s over, is there anything left for readers? Yes, Lake Forest College associate professor of theater <strong>Chloe Johnston</strong> and her coauthor show. Pairing short histories of 15 Chicago-based theater companies with examples of their improvisation exercises, this book documents the origins of Second City, Free Street Theater, and other ensembles (many with UChicago ties) and creates a record of how they perform.</p> <h2>Rabbit’s Blues: The Life and Music of Johnny Hodges</h2> <p><strong>Con Chapman, AB’73</strong></p> <p>“He was the Calvin Coolidge of the jazz world of his day, never saying three words when two would do,” writes novelist, playwright, and humorist <strong>Con Chapman</strong> of saxophonist Johnny Hodges (1907–70). Because of the musician’s reticence, mystery has shrouded much of his life and legacy. Filling gaps and dispelling myths, Chapman’s account is the first full-length biography of the Massachusetts-born sax soloist and Duke Ellington collaborator. Chapman explores the reputation Hodges held as the greatest jazz altoist until Charlie Parker upended swing with bebop.</p> <h2>Speaking of Summer: A Novel</h2> <p><strong>Kalisha Buckhanon, AB’99, AM’07</strong></p> <p>Her twin sister, Summer, disappeared from their Harlem apartment, but Autumn Spencer can’t count on authorities to pursue her missing person claim. Searching on her own, Autumn contacts detectives in their Illinois hometown, trawls for news about killings of Harlem women, and spirals into vexed family memories. Centered on the sister who vanishes and the sister left alone to grapple with the mystery, <strong>Kalisha Buckhanon</strong>’s fourth novel is a literary thriller about women whose suffering is ignored by society.</p> <hr /><p><em>For additional alumni releases, use the link to the </em>Magazine<em>’s Goodreads bookshelf at <a href="mag.uchicago.edu/alumni-books">mag.uchicago.edu/alumni-books</a>.</em></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/university-news" hreflang="en">University News</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/books" hreflang="en">Books</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refuchicago field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/college-alumni" hreflang="en">College alumni</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/graduate-alumni" hreflang="en">Graduate alumni</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refformats field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/formats/releases" hreflang="en">Releases</a></div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/releases-37" data-a2a-title="Releases"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Funiversity-news%2Freleases-37&amp;title=Releases"></a></span> Fri, 09 Aug 2019 22:17:25 +0000 admin 7153 at https://mag.uchicago.edu