Video https://mag.uchicago.edu/video en Mildred Dresselhaus, “Queen of carbon science,” dies at 86 https://mag.uchicago.edu/science-medicine/mildred-dresselhaus-queen-carbon-science-dies-86 <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/1702_Chung_Millie.jpg" width="1600" height="743" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/jmiller" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">jmiller</span></span> <span>Mon, 02/20/2017 - 11:24</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Mildred “Millie” Dresselhaus, PhD’59, will be remembered as a role model for girls who want to be scientists. (Photography by Dominick Reuter, courtesy MIT News Office. CC BY-NC-ND 3.0)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/jeanie-chung"> <a href="/author/jeanie-chung"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Jeanie Chung</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/web-exclusives" hreflang="en">Web exclusives</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item">02.20.2017</div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Dresselhaus, PhD’59, was a model for women and scientists everywhere.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Tuesday was a somber day in the <em>Magazine</em> offices. From <a href="http://news.mit.edu/2017/institute-professor-emerita-mildred-dresselhaus-dies-86-0221" target="_blank"><em>MIT News</em></a> we heard of the death of solid state physicist Mildred Dresselhaus, PhD’59, known to all of us who have met her as Millie. Dresselhaus had just been on our minds as the star of a new General Electric advertisement that imagines a world where brilliant scientists like her are regarded with the adoration and emulation we typically reserve for pop stars. Take a look at the ad, “<a href="http://www.slate.com/blogs/xx_factor/2017/02/09/ge_publicly_commits_to_hiring_more_women_with_a_gorgeous_ad_directed_by.html" target="_blank">What If Scientists Were Celebrities?</a>”</p> <h5>[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_original","fid":"3886","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"389","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"500"}}]] Dresselhaus. (Photography by Bryce Vickmark, courtesy MIT News Office. CC BY-NC-ND 3.0)</h5> <p>Directed by indie filmmaker Nicole Holofcener, the spot promotes GE’s efforts to have 20,000 women in technical roles by 2020, and ends by showing women already working in those roles—some, perhaps, inspired by Dresselhaus. Known as “the queen of carbon science” for her research into the optical, conductive, and vibrational properties of carbon at the atomic level, Dresselhaus was a strong advocate for and mentor of women in science. Toward the end of the ad, after walking out onto a stage in front of cheering fans—many of them women—she smiles as though she’s been in the spotlight her whole life.</p> <p>And often she was, if not in Hollywood style. Dresselhaus met two presidents, one of whom awarded her the highest civilian honor bestowed by the US government, the <a href="https://www.c-span.org/video/?322905-1/presidential-medal-freedom-ceremony" target="_blank">Presidential Medal of Freedom</a>. The recognition followed her National Medal of Science, Enrico Fermi Award, Kavli Prize, and many other honors. She was the first woman at MIT to attain the rank of full tenured professor. The president of MIT, Rafael Reif, commented, “Yesterday, we lost a giant—an exceptionally creative scientist and engineer who was also a delightful human being.” That was our experience of Millie too.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/science-medicine" hreflang="en">Science &amp; Medicine</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/stem" hreflang="en">STEM</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refuchicago field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/physical-sciences-division" hreflang="en">Physical Sciences Division</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-relatedstories field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>“<a href="http://mag.uchicago.edu/science-medicine/superconductor" target="_blank">Superconductor</a>” (<em>Inquiry</em>, Spring/15</p> <p>“<a href="http://magazine.uchicago.edu/0878/features/glimpses.shtml" target="_blank">Glimpses: Mildred S. Dresselhaus</a>” (<em>University of Chicago Magazine</em>, July–Aug/08</p> <p>“<a href="http://magazine.uchicago.edu/0878/peer_review/alumni_awards.shtml" target="_blank">Alumni Award Winners, 2008</a>” (<em>University of Chicago Magazine</em>, July–Aug/08 </p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-relatedlinks field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p><strong>Learn</strong> more about UChicago’s <a href="http://physics.uchicago.edu" target="_blank">Department of Physics</a>.</p> <p><strong>See</strong> UChicago’s list of Presidential Medal of Freedom <a href="http://www.uchicago.edu/about/accolades/23/" target="_blank">recipients</a>.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-storymedia field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><h2 class="media-icon media-icon-video">Video</h2> <iframe width="200" height="113" src="https://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/sQ6_fOX7ITQ?rel=0?ecver=1" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><p>“What If Scientists Were Celebrities?” Mildred Dresselhaus, PhD’59, stars in GE’s latest ad series.</p> <p> <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sQ6_fOX7ITQ" target="_blank" class="more-link">WATCH THE VIDEO AT YOUTUBE</a></p> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/science-medicine/mildred-dresselhaus-queen-carbon-science-dies-86" data-a2a-title="Mildred Dresselhaus, “Queen of carbon science,” dies at 86"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Fscience-medicine%2Fmildred-dresselhaus-queen-carbon-science-dies-86&amp;title=Mildred%20Dresselhaus%2C%20%E2%80%9CQueen%20of%20carbon%20science%2C%E2%80%9D%20dies%20at%2086"></a></span> Mon, 20 Feb 2017 17:24:36 +0000 jmiller 6263 at https://mag.uchicago.edu CIA’s John Brennan talks Russia, Trump at I-House https://mag.uchicago.edu/law-policy-society/cias-john-brennan-talks-russia-trump-i-house <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/1701_Allen_CIA-Brennan.jpg" width="1600" height="743" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/jmiller" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">jmiller</span></span> <span>Fri, 01/06/2017 - 16:41</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Before meeting president-elect Donald Trump, CIA director John Brennan said, “I am hoping he is going to be respectful of the profession, respectful of the agency.” (Photo courtesy University of Chicago Institute of Politics)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/susie-allen-ab09"> <a href="/author/susie-allen-ab09"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Susie Allen, AB’09</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/web-exclusives" hreflang="en">Web exclusives</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item">01.06.2017</div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>The spy agency’s director spoke the day before his first meeting with the president-elect.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>On the eve of his first meeting with president-elect Donald Trump, Central Intelligence Agency director John Brennan said he would give the nation’s new leader “the benefit of the doubt” and looked forward to a “rather robust if not sporty discussion” with him.</p> <p>At <a href="https://ihouse.uchicago.edu/" target="_blank">International House</a>&nbsp;on Thursday night, Brennan took questions from <a href="https://political-science.uchicago.edu/directory/robert-pape" target="_blank">Robert Pape</a>, professor of political science, and from members of the packed audience on topics including Russian interference in the presidential election, Trump’s contentious statements about the CIA and FBI, and terrorism.</p> <p>“I fully anticipate that the incoming administration will have a period of learning about what it is that the CIA does, what the intelligence community does,” said Brennan, who joined the CIA in 1980 and became director in 2013. Each of the five presidents he’s served, he said, arrived in Washington with a different style and understanding of the agency’s work.</p> <p>“It doesn’t bother me if someone is going to be skeptical and challenge our work,” he said. “But I expect that the president of the United States will recognize that the CIA, the intelligence community were established by statute for a very important reason. … &nbsp;I am hoping he is going to be respectful of the profession, respectful of the agency.”</p> <p>Throughout the event, which was sponsored by the University’s Institute of Politics, Brennan emphasized the need to understand Russia’s methods and motives for influencing the US presidential election. Brennan said president Barack Obama wants to “tell the world that this is something that you need to be watchful of, and take steps to safeguard your institutions of governance.” And with key upcoming elections in Germany and France, “It was determined that it was very important for the United States to understand exactly what happened here so that we can not only safeguard our system but also make sure that we inform others. By exposing this publicly, it may make [Russian president Vladimir] Putin more reluctant in the future to go down this path.”</p> <p>Later Brennan responded to an audience member's question about the CIA’s own history of electoral meddling in countries such as Nicaragua and Haiti. “In the past the agency was asked to do some things that by current standards, I think, are seen as beyond the pale,” he said. Today there is broad consensus that interference in elections “is not something we, the United States government, should be involved in at all. The concept of free and fair elections should not just apply to the United States; it should apply to countries worldwide.”</p> <p>Pape, who studies terrorism, asked Brennan to assess the use of drones as a counterterrorism measure, noting that drone campaigns in Somalia and Iraq appear to have been more effective than those in Afghanistan. Brennan argued that while drones are powerful instruments of war and intelligence gathering, more needs to be done in the Middle East to address the underlying causes of extremism. “It's not a question of just&nbsp;taking terrorists off the battlefield,” he said. The real challenge is to “resolve those underlying factors and conditions that have allowed these safe havens to develop.”</p> <p>As the event drew to a close, Brennan addressed an audience member’s concern that the CIA and intelligence gathering might be politicized by elected officials including Trump. “Any president could seek to use the CIA to advance their own agenda,” he said.</p> <p>For that reason, Brennan said, agents are trained to understand the importance of putting information into context, making sure lawmakers are “informed and enlightened” about the intelligence they receive. In the months before the Iraq War, “there was concern within the intelligence community that some individuals in the last administration were looking for intelligence that would justify moving against Saddam Hussein in Iraq. We learned a lot from that process,” Brennan reflected. “We have an obligation to make sure that we push forward the full and comprehensive appreciation of what a situation involves.”</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/law-policy-society" hreflang="en">Law, Policy &amp; Society</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/politics" hreflang="en">Politics</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/cia" hreflang="en">CIA</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/terrorism" hreflang="en">Terrorism</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/political-science" hreflang="en">Political Science</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/russia" hreflang="en">Russia</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refuchicago field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/institute-politics" hreflang="en">Institute of Politics</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-relatedstories field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>“<a href="http://mag.uchicago.edu/law-policy-society/deadly-force" target="_self">Deadly Force</a>” (<em>University of Chicago Magazine</em>, Summer/16)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-relatedlinks field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p><strong><a href="http://ihouse.uchicago.edu/events/upcoming_programs/" target="_blank">Attend</a></strong> the I-House Global Voices Lecture Series.</p> <p><strong><a href="http://politics.uchicago.edu/" target="_blank">Learn</a></strong> more about the Institute of Politics’ upcoming events.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-storymedia field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><h2 class="media-icon media-icon-video">Video</h2> <iframe width="200" height="113" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/dKUyubt1rFw?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><p>Director of the CIA John Brennan in conversation with professor Robert Pape.</p> <p> <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dKUyubt1rFw" target="_blank" class="more-link">WATCH THE VIDEO AT YOUTUBE</a></p> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/law-policy-society/cias-john-brennan-talks-russia-trump-i-house" data-a2a-title="CIA’s John Brennan talks Russia, Trump at I-House"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Flaw-policy-society%2Fcias-john-brennan-talks-russia-trump-i-house&amp;title=CIA%E2%80%99s%20John%20Brennan%20talks%20Russia%2C%20Trump%20at%20I-House"></a></span> Fri, 06 Jan 2017 22:41:26 +0000 jmiller 6156 at https://mag.uchicago.edu Cosmic cuisine https://mag.uchicago.edu/science-medicine/cosmic-cuisine <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/Latke.jpg" width="1600" height="743" alt="Wendy Freedman discusses Yiddish galaxies" title="Wendy Freedman at the 70th Latke-Hamantash Debate" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/mrsearcy" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">mrsearcy</span></span> <span>Tue, 12/20/2016 - 16:03</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Wendy Freedman, professor of astronomy and astrophysics, was the first debater of the night at the 70th annual Latke-Hamantash Debate on Tuesday, November 22, 2016. Photography by Eddie Quinones.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/maureen-searcy"> <a href="/author/maureen-searcy"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Maureen Searcy</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/inquiry" hreflang="en">Inquiry</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item">12.21.16</div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Professor Wendy Freedman applies astrophysics expertise to the Latke-Hamantash Debate.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>In November UChicago Hillel hosted the <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ut7wEN0zwwg" target="_blank">70th annual Latke-Hamantash Debate</a>, during which faculty members applied their expertise to champion traditional Jewish foods: the latke, a fried potato pancake eaten during Hanukkah, or the hamantash, a three-cornered pastry stuffed with poppy seeds or fruit preserves eaten on Purim.</p> <p>This year the debaters included David Nirenberg, dean of the Social Sciences Division; Wendy Freedman, the John and Marion Sullivan University Professor of Astronomy and Astrophysics; Shadi Bartsch-Zimmer, the Helen A. Regenstein Distinguished Service Professor of Classics and the Program in Gender Studies; and Anne Rogers, associate professor in the Department of Computer Science.</p> <p><a href="https://astro.uchicago.edu/people/wendy-freedman.php" target="_blank">Freedman</a>, who helped lead the team that conducted the Hubble Space Telescope Key Project and established the <a href="https://www.cfa.harvard.edu/~dfabricant/huchra/hubble/" target="_blank">Hubble Constant</a>, was a prime choice to explain the universe’s preference for one dish over the other. <em>Inquiry</em> presents Freedman’s presentation below.<em>—Maureen Searcy</em></p> <p><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/hr.png" /></p> <p><strong>Wendy Freedman:</strong> I am honored to have been asked to participate in an event of such cosmic and comic importance, and concerning a matter about which I am supremely qualified to speak. In that connection, I note a very, very serious omission on the part of the organizers of the Latke-Hamantash Debate. In the 69 years prior to this debate, not a single astronomer has ever been asked to participate. I think it’s a <em>shanda</em>. A scandal. The field of astronomy, probably the second oldest profession, has evidence of cosmic significance that has been excluded from this debate.</p> <p>I embrace controversial subjects. As a member of the Canadian Jewish community of Toronto, I grew up in culinary and cultural controversy. In my grandparents’ home, dinner arguments were in a combination of English, Yiddish, and Canadian beaver grunts. And I had to learn to distinguish those three languages. Sometimes the debates were so heated that our igloo started to melt.</p> <p>Yet you should be aware that my late grandmothers Chaike and Rivka would likely be <em>plotzing</em> if they were here, embarrassed by the very notion that I would be called to speak about anything related to cooking or baking. They both tried valiantly to teach me our wonderful family recipes for the holidays, but this was an area in which I did not excel. Never mind that I wanted to study astrophysics. Enough with this <em>mishegas</em>, craziness that would for sure seal my fate as an <em>alte moyd,</em> never to find a husband.</p> <p>My recollection—sorry, Mom and Dad, if you’re watching this live streaming. I apologize. My recollection was that these recipes went something along the lines of: add a <em>bissle</em> of flour until it looks right. Well, how many ounces are in a bissle? Approximately how much is that? <em>Nu</em> until the texture is right and you can roll the dough. Yes, but how much is that? Oy vey, or oy vey, eh, as we say in Canada. Let me do it. You are no help.</p> <p>Years later I still struggle to make dough. I don’t think I’ve ever gotten the consistency right for my grandmothers’ hamantashen. Fortunately, cooking and baking were not required prerequisites for astrophysics. After university I immigrated to the US. In those days, there was no wall between our countries. Not even a fence. I crossed the border in broad daylight with a few other Jewish scientists, some hockey players like Wayne Gretzky, some comedians you may have heard of—John Candy, Dan Aykroyd, Jim Carrey, Mike Myers, and Ted Cruz—seeking opportunities in a land that embraces immigrants.</p> <p>Thirty-five years of research in astronomy has prepared me for this debate. I can state unequivocally that I am the only person who has participated in these debates qualified to give a complete recipe for either latkes or hamantashen. It requires patience to make either latkes or hamantashen. In fact, 13.7 billion years of patience are required to create the necessary ingredients.</p> <p>Here is a complete recipe for latkes and hamantashen. Preheat the universe in the big bang to about 1,000 trillion degrees Celsius. From the primordial chicken soup, create hydrogen and helium—hydrogen being an essential ingredient for water. Then expand and cool the universe for one billion years to allow the formation of stars. Zimmer. Oops, I meant simmer. Simmer. Add a bissle of supernova explosions. See, Bubbie, I learned something. Stir in more star formation, this time with heavy elements. We need sodium and chlorine to make salt, without which cooking is not very interesting. Add a dollop of planet formation. Next, a sprinkle of microbial life. Poppies and potatoes. And don’t forget the magic ingredient: bubbies! And then and only then do we get the recipe we’re all familiar with. For latkes we preheat the oil. For hamantashen we preheat the oven. And you can look the rest of it up on Google if you don’t know the recipe. But now you have the complete recipe.</p> <p>Let’s examine the ingredients for latkes. The first ingredient is potatoes. After God created the potato, he was so enamored by this perfect form that he decided to sprinkle them throughout the universe. I think these look good enough to eat. Turns out that in our solar system, there is a ready supply for latkes. The first two images are NASA images from the asteroid belt. Astronomy tells us that potatoes are the perfect ingredient—the key to heavenly taste. Now you might disagree. But good luck with free expression, even at the University of Chicago. God has spoken.</p> <p><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/LHD%20Freedman%20potatoes.png" alt="potatoes throughout the solar system" width="855" height="480" /></p> <p>Back to the debate at hand. I will examine the evidence, both historical and recent, for astronomical clues to the question of latkes versus hamantashen. I will make four arguments.</p> <p>(1) Galileo Galilei is known both as the father of modern astronomy and of modern physics, and he was a well-known connoisseur of Jewish cooking. He was the first to make an astronomical telescope and to look upward at the sky and not only to look at the sky but to record and interpret what he saw. In poring over his notebooks of 1609, I have been able to reveal an overlooked discovery.</p> <p>In addition to discovering the moons of Jupiter, the phases of Venus, and spots on the sun, Galileo’s notebooks contain hand-drawn and beautiful drawings of latkes. Imagine his surprise when he looked up into the heavens and saw a beautiful, textured, and bubbly image of a hot latke as the batter hits the frying pan and it turns a golden brown. Here is an image from Galileo’s notebook. The phases of making latkes. Galileo wrote, “I render infinite thanks to God for being so kind as to make me alone the first observer of marvels kept hidden in obscurity for all previous centuries.” I, too, now know how he felt.</p> <p><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/LHD%20Freedman%20Galileo.png" alt="Galileo's moon phases" width="856" height="481" /></p> <p>(2) Edwin Hubble [SB 1910, PhD 1917] changed forever our perception of the universe that we live in. In the 1920s, a debate was raging in the astronomical community. This debate predated our prestigious Latke-Hamantash Debate, and it was almost equally well known, i.e., completely unknown outside of the University of Chicago. Edwin Hubble himself began his distinguished academic career at the University of Chicago. He set out to study the nature of a class of astronomical objects known as nebulae. A person who devotes their life to the study of nebulae is known as a nebulish. That’s to be distinguished from the Yiddish word <em>nebbish</em>, which means pitifully ineffectual, luckless, and timid. You don’t want to be a nebbish. Hubble was not a nebbish. In fact, he was a superb athlete. He played basketball for the University of Chicago, he was a Rhodes Scholar, and he rose to the rank of colonel in World War I. So remember he was a nebulish, not a nebbish. At the heart of the debate was the question: Were these objects nearby new stars in the process of forming or were they distant island universes on their own?</p> <p>Using the most powerful telescopes in the world, Hubble made a monumental discovery. In the words of my famous late astronomical colleague Carl Sagan [AB’54, SB’55, SM’56, PhD’60], also a University of Chicago alum, Hubble discovered that the universe is filled with billions and billions of <em>galatkes</em>. Hubble found further evidence that these galaxies, as the galatkes are now referred to, are taking part in a global expansion of the entire universe. You think I’m kidding, but I checked the Yiddish-English Dictionary for galaxy. <em>Galaktik</em>. And for the young skeptics among you—most of you are not fluent in Yiddish—I double-checked with the indisputable source of all knowledge: Google. Galaktik. OK, close enough. Galatkes. Even with the powerful Hubble Space Telescope—and I’ve spent much of my career observing with it—you don’t see <em>galhamantashen</em> or any other astronomical objects resembling three cornered pastries with filling.</p> <p><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/LHD%20Freedman%20galaxies.png" alt="latke galaxies" width="855" height="481" /></p> <p>Albert Einstein was so intrigued by Hubble’s discoveries that he traveled to Pasadena, California, and to nearby Mount Wilson, home of the telescope Hubble had used. And Hubble let Einstein peer through the telescope. I looked for a reference to see if Einstein had weighed in on the Latke-Hamantash debate, or if there was a picture of Einstein in the Einstein Archives showing him enjoying either latkes or hamantashen, but I could find no clues. On this important question, Einstein did not leave us his answer, although I think one could make the argument that he was reacting to eating a hamantash, but we’ll debate that later.</p> <p><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/LHD%20Freedman%20Einstein.png" alt="Einstein reacting to hamantash?" width="853" height="481" /></p> <p>(3) Arno Penzias and Robert Wilson of the Bell Laboratories in New Jersey made a discovery for which they were awarded the Nobel Prize in 1965. If the universe had a beginning hot enough to make the ingredients for latkes and hamantashen, then a relic of this big bang radiation should be observable today, cooled to a temperature of three degrees above absolute zero. Penzias and Wilson discovered this background radiation, and modern measurements have now mapped this background to extraordinary precision. So here is a satellite image of the sky in microwaves. The color scheme is, of course, entirely false. It is intended simply to convey regions of the universe that are colder, in blue, than others, in red. The astronomers who chose this particular color scheme, however, have missed the opportunity to make a profound discovery, clearly evidence that the cosmos resembles a giant latke.</p> <p><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/LHD%20Freedman%20CMB.png" alt="Cosmic microwave background" width="854" height="481" /></p> <p><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/LHD%20Freedman%20CMB%20latkes.png" alt="Cosmic microwave background latkes" width="854" height="481" /></p> <p>Finally (4) This audience gets ahead of you. I guess you are familiar with the 27-kilometer long tunnel in the countryside running underground near the Swiss-French border outside of Geneva. It is known as the LHC, or Latke Hamantash Cooker. It is here that the World Wide Web was created in the early 1990s, presumably when Al Gore went there to learn of experiments intended to answer the question of which is better, latkes or hamantashen.</p> <p><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/LHD%20Freedman%20LHC.png" alt="Large Hadron Collider" width="854" height="482" /></p> <p>Test particles, latkes and hamantashen, are being smashed into each other at astronomical energies, accelerated to nearly the speed of light, creating showers of particles in order to learn about the fundamental constituents of matter. A host of other particles appear very briefly, particles that have not been seen since the big bang 13.7 billion years ago. What do we see from these collisions? Well, like the childhood game, which of these images is not like the other? Shower of particles created in the Latke Hamantash Cooker, a latke, a hamantash.</p> <p><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/LHD%20Freedman%20particles.png" alt="particles, latke, hamantash" width="854" height="481" /></p> <p>A three-year-old could answer this question. You don’t need a PhD scientist. Sure, the LHC discovered the Higgs boson, whatever that is. But I say Higgs schmigs. The great discovery justifying the modest investment in the LHC of $10 billion was that, just as the cosmos is full of potatoes, the submicroscopic world is shaped like a latke.</p> <p>And so I rest my case. Clearly, the empirical evidence from astronomy and physics gathered over a period of centuries indicates that the cosmos has a preference for latkes over hamantashen. We see it on all scales from the smallest particles, to our asteroid belt filled with potatoes, to an expanding world of <em>galatkes</em>, and an imprint of latkes on the grandest scale—that of the universe itself. Thank you very much.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/science-medicine" hreflang="en">Science &amp; Medicine</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/astronomy" hreflang="en">Astronomy</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/astrophysics" hreflang="en">Astrophysics</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/latke-hamantash" hreflang="en">Latke-Hamantash</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refuchicago field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/latke-hamantash-debate" hreflang="en">Latke-Hamantash debate</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/physical-sciences-division" hreflang="en">Physical Sciences Division</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-relatedstories field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p><a href="http://mag.uchicago.edu/science-medicine/small-universe-big-glass" target="_blank">"Small Universe, Big Glass"</a> (<em>University of Chicago Magazine</em>, Mar-Apr/15)</p> <p><a href="https://news.uchicago.edu/article/2014/11/14/68th-latke-hamantash-debate-set-nov-25" target="_blank">"68th Latke-Hamantash Debate set for Nov. 25"</a> (University of Chicago News Office, November 14, 2014)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-relatedlinks field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Give now: <a href="http://campaign.uchicago.edu/priorities/psd/astronomy-and-astrophysicsbig-glass/" target="_blank" data-unsp-sanitized="clean">Support the Physical Sciences Division</a>.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-storymedia field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><h2 class="media-icon media-icon-video">Video</h2> <iframe width="200" height="113" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Ut7wEN0zwwg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><p>The Latke-Hamantash Debate has been a University of Chicago tradition since 1946. UChicago faculty members apply the knowledge and tools of their disciplines to resolve this age-old question in an evening of fun and frivolity! Past participants have included Nobel Prize winners and University presidents. Spectators gathered in Mandel Hall for yet another attempt to resolve this question once and for all.</p> <p> <a href="https://youtu.be/Ut7wEN0zwwg" class="more-link">WATCH THE VIDEO AT YOUTUBE</a></p> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/science-medicine/cosmic-cuisine" data-a2a-title="Cosmic cuisine"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Fscience-medicine%2Fcosmic-cuisine&amp;title=Cosmic%20cuisine"></a></span> Tue, 20 Dec 2016 22:03:56 +0000 mrsearcy 6141 at https://mag.uchicago.edu Architect Jeanne Gang on the complex geometries of Campus North https://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/architect-jeanne-gang-complex-geometries-campus-north <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/1609_Allen_Complex-geometries-Campus-North.jpg" width="1600" height="743" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/jmiller" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">jmiller</span></span> <span>Tue, 09/20/2016 - 10:19</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>(Photography by Steve Hall, copyright Hedrick Blessing)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/susie-allen-ab09"> <a href="/author/susie-allen-ab09"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Susie Allen, AB’09</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/web-exclusives" hreflang="en">Web exclusives</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item"><p>09.20.2016</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item">A look inside UChicago’s newest residence hall.</div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item">Last Monday was one of the final days of quiet in <a href="http://housing.uchicago.edu/houses_houses/campus_north_residence_hall_and_dining_commons/" target="_blank">Campus North Residential Commons</a>—and probably among the last times the 400,000-square-foot complex of three towers would smell so little like three-day-old Giordano’s. Just a few days before a flood of first-year students began settling in, architect <a href="http://studiogang.com/people/jeanne-gang" target="_blank">Jeanne Gang</a> and assistant vice president for campus life David Clark gave reporters a tour of the still-pristine space. Here’s a peek inside. <h5>[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_original","fid":"3675","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"326","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"500"}}]] (Copyright Tom Harris Photography)</h5> Gang is pleased with the “complex geometries” created by the towers’ custom-made concrete facades and the interplay between the three towers. A key goal of the project was to create “greater connectivity and a sense of community,” Gang said, both within houses and between campus and Hyde Park. <h5>[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_original","fid":"3676","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"574","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"500"}}]] (Photography by Steve Hall, copyright Hedrick Blessing)</h5> Students will enter into a welcoming lobby area, which also includes a sizable mail room behind the reception desk. Think nobody gets mail anymore? Over 100,000 packages came through UChicago’s residence halls last year, according to Clark. Gang said she and her team spent time on campus to learn about students’ daily habits, so they knew a place to collect “your toothpaste from Amazon” would be welcome. <h5>[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_original","fid":"3677","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"332","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"500"}}]] (Photography by Steve Hall, copyright Hedrick Blessing)</h5> The <a href="https://news.uchicago.edu/article/2016/03/28/campus-north-dining-commons-named-college-alumnus-frank-baker-and-laura-day" target="_blank">Frank and Laura Baker Dining Commons</a> has tables for each of the eight newly named <a href="https://news.uchicago.edu/article/2016/06/01/university-announces-names-eight-new-college-houses" target="_blank">College Houses</a> in Campus North. Although students can eat at any dining hall, 92 percent choose to eat at their house table, Clark said. An overlook from the floor above allows students to peek down and see which of their friends is midmeal. <h5>[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_original","fid":"3678","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"332","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"500"}}]] (Photography by Jean Lachat)</h5> Many colleges encourage architects to dispense with bookshelves in new dorm rooms. Not so in Campus North. “Our students are decidedly analog,” according to Clark. Students involved in the design process had strong opinions about how much shelf space they needed (12 linear feet, to be precise). Among UChicago students, there’s a “real respect for the book, which I share,” Gang said. Within their rooms, students also have the option to choose between natural ventilation and air-conditioning—one of many environmentally friendly features of the building. Residents can monitor their energy use online, and Gang hopes this might spark some friendly sustainability competitions between houses. <h5>[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_original","fid":"3679","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"332","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"500"}}]] (Photography by Susie Allen)</h5> “I might be seen studying here someday,” Gang said of this reading room, which offers a 270-degree view of the city. A student on the project’s design advisory committee convinced the architects the study space should have pride of place near the very top of the tower.</div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/university-news" hreflang="en">University News</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-relatedstories field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>“<a href="https://news.uchicago.edu/article/2016/09/12/university-chicago-opens-campus-north-residential-commons" target="_blank">University of Chicago Opens Campus North Residential Commons</a>” (University of Chicago News Office, 09.12.2016)</p> <p>“<a href="https://news.uchicago.edu/article/2016/06/01/university-announces-names-eight-new-college-houses" target="_blank">University Announces Names for Eight New College Houses</a>” (University of Chicago News Office, 06.01.2016)</p> <p>“<a href="https://news.uchicago.edu/article/2016/03/28/campus-north-dining-commons-named-college-alumnus-frank-baker-and-laura-day" target="_blank">Campus North Dining Commons named for College alumnus Frank Baker and Laura Day</a>” (University of Chicago News Office, 03.28.2016)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-relatedlinks field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p><a href="https://news.uchicago.edu/article/2016/09/12/university-chicago-opens-campus-north-residential-commons" target="_blank">Learn</a> more about Campus North.</p> <p><a href="https://youtu.be/bjeXlr_qsGE" target="_blank">Watch</a> a time lapse of the construction process.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-storymedia field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><h2 class="media-icon media-icon-video">Video</h2> <iframe width="220" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/uvYubrSs44w?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><p>Listen as John Boyer and Jeanne Gang discuss the design of Campus North.</p> <p> <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uvYubrSs44w" class="more-link" target="_blank">WATCH THE VIDEO AT YOUTUBE</a></p> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/architect-jeanne-gang-complex-geometries-campus-north" data-a2a-title="Architect Jeanne Gang on the complex geometries of Campus North"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Funiversity-news%2Farchitect-jeanne-gang-complex-geometries-campus-north&amp;title=Architect%20Jeanne%20Gang%20on%20the%20complex%20geometries%20of%20Campus%20North"></a></span> Tue, 20 Sep 2016 15:19:21 +0000 jmiller 5948 at https://mag.uchicago.edu Discussing development https://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/discussing-development <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/1608_Belanger_Discussing-development.jpg" width="1600" height="743" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/jmiller" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">jmiller</span></span> <span>Mon, 08/01/2016 - 11:51</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Peter Levavi recites a poem, as Stacy Patrice uses yoga to demonstrate principle number seven (stack, leverage, and access) at the June 23 <a href="http://placelab.uchicago.edu/ethical-redevelopment" target="_blank">Public Convening on Ethical Redevelopment</a>. (Photo by Robert Kozloff)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/christian-belanger-ab17"> <a href="/author/christian-belanger-ab17"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Christian Belanger, AB’17</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/web-exclusives" hreflang="en">Web exclusives</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item"><p>08.01.2016</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item">Members of local, UChicago communities gather for performances and conversation surrounding the Place Lab’s proposed process of ethical redevelopment.</div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item">“What would a day look like where we were trying to get people hot for policy?” That was the rhetorical question artist <a href="http://civicengagement.uchicago.edu/profiles/theaster-gates/" target="_blank">Theaster Gates</a> posed to <a href="http://politics.uchicago.edu/" target="_blank">Institute of Politics</a> executive director <a href="https://news.uchicago.edu/article/2014/02/06/steve-edwards-appointed-executive-director-institute-politics" target="_blank">Steve Edwards</a> at the June 23 <a href="http://placelab.uchicago.edu/ethical-redevelopment" target="_blank">Public Convening on Ethical Redevelopment</a>. The community forum featured artistic performances, academic lectures, and audience discussion about a new vision for fair, principled urban development in Chicago. (Edwards joked that Gates had stumbled on the new motto for <a href="http://harris.uchicago.edu" target="_blank">Chicago Harris</a>: “Hot for Policy.”) In addition to his own artistic practice, Gates is the director of the University’s <a href="https://arts.uchicago.edu/artsandpubliclife" target="_blank">Arts + Public Life initiative</a>. Both efforts aim to nurture and expand art—and conversations about art and its place in the public sphere—in Chicago and beyond. He is also leading the University’s efforts to develop an Arts Block in the <a href="https://news.uchicago.edu/article/2016/06/03/university-chicago-announces-plans-arts-block-washington-park" target="_blank">Washington Park community</a>. In part, the concept of ethical redevelopment has its roots in Gates’s childhood experience of seeing buildings demolished in his East Garfield Park neighborhood. “It becomes difficult when you feel like you’re not in the conversation for change,” Gates said. Ethical redevelopment was designed as an antidote to these feelings of exclusion: a blueprint for thinking about how neighborhoods can be involved and influential in their own development. Right now it consists of nine principles that are equal parts exhortation and reflection, designed to serve as a corrective to traditional methods of urban development. The principle of “pedagogical moments” asks people to “consider the steps in each project that are instructive,” while the principle of “place over time” muses that “a sense of place cannot be developed overnight.” Much like the reimagined process of community development the principles call for, the process of crafting them is supposed to be a collaborative venture. So Gates and the Place Lab invited artists to the convening to interpret the principles. The performances included a speech by former <a href="http://chicagodefender.com" target="_blank"><em>Chicago Defender</em></a> reporter Ethan Michaeli, AB’89; a collaboration between soul singer Coultrain and experimental producer Takuya Nakamura; and a number of spoken word poems. Real estate developer Peter Levavi read a paper about the “intricate dance” of financing affordable housing developments, while Stacy Patrice, a Chicago-based yoga teacher, intertwined her limbs in her own intricate dance, complementing Levavi’s words with her movements. In the program’s second act, five academics and community organizers—sometimes the line was blurred—spoke about the role of factors from art to economics in ensuring ethical redevelopment takes place. <a href="http://political-science.uchicago.edu/people/faculty/cohen.shtml" target="_blank">Cathy Cohen</a>, the David and Mary Winton Green Professor of Political Science, used an interview with the basketball player LeBron James to illustrate the ethos behind the organizing strategies of activist group <a href="http://byp100.org/" target="_blank">BYP100</a>, most famous for its demonstrations against police brutality after the release of the Laquan McDonald shooting video, and other organizations like it. Drawing on James’s comments about the support and love he received from his hometown of Akron, Ohio, because of his athletic ability, Cohen argued that a similar sort of “radical love” should be extended to all<em> </em>members of marginalized communities. “His feelings of being supported and loved are what activists are looking for within the black, feminist, and queer tradition,” said Cohen. “How many people in Chicago believe their city loves and cares for them?” The event ended with questions from the audience—composed of a mix of South Side residents and UChicago students—for Gates and Edwards, and a lively debate between audience members over the sustainability of capitalism. (The prevailing mood was, to put it mildly, skeptical.) Audience member Maya Camilla Baumann appreciated the convening as an attempt to bring together community voices and institutional power. “The stage provided a space in which people of color artistically and academically presented their ideals on redevelopment and other important themes,” said Baumann, a rising third-year in the College. “I look forward to the smaller, more discussion-based events Place Lab intends to hold.” Gates ended by emphasizing the need for action to ensure inclusion in present and future development, and noting his own feelings of urgency. “I really think I’m an introvert,” he said. “I just don’t have the luxury for that.”</div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/university-news" hreflang="en">University News</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-refuchicago field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/arts-public-life-0" hreflang="en">Arts + Public Life</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/chicago-harris" hreflang="en">Harris Public Policy</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/place-lab" hreflang="en">Place Lab</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-relatedstories field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>“<a href="https://news.uchicago.edu/article/2016/07/28/artists-and-scholars-convene-address-equitable-neighborhood-development" target="_blank">Artists and Scholars Convene to Address Equitable Neighborhood Development</a>” (University of Chicago News Office, 07.28.2016)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-relatedlinks field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Learn more about the <a href="http://placelab.uchicago.edu/" target="_blank">Place Lab</a> and ethical redevelopment.</p> <p>Follow <a href="https://twitter.com/PlaceLabChicago" target="_blank">@PlaceLabChicago</a> on Twitter.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-storymedia field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><h2 class="media-icon media-icon-video">Video</h2> <iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/158374273?byline=0&portrait=0" width="200" height="113" frameborder="0" webkitallowfullscreen mozallowfullscreen allowfullscreen></iframe><p>A look at the nine principles of ethical redevelopment, as formulated by Theaster Gates and the Place Lab team.</p> <p> <a href="https://vimeo.com/158374273" target="_blank" class="more-link">WATCH THE VIDEO AT VIMEO</a></p> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/discussing-development" data-a2a-title="Discussing development"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Funiversity-news%2Fdiscussing-development&amp;title=Discussing%20development"></a></span> Mon, 01 Aug 2016 16:51:45 +0000 jmiller 5889 at https://mag.uchicago.edu Olympic hopeful tries to swim her way to Rio https://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/olympic-hopeful-tries-swim-her-way-rio <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/1606_Belanger_Olympic-hopeful.jpg" width="1600" height="743" alt="Naomy Grand’Pierre" title="Naomy Grand’Pierre" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/jmiller" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">jmiller</span></span> <span>Tue, 06/28/2016 - 17:00</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Naomy Grand’Pierre and her family hope to raise awareness of the sport of swimming in Haiti. (Photos courtesy Naomy Grand’Pierre)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/christian-belanger-ab17"> <a href="/author/christian-belanger-ab17"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Christian Belanger, AB’17</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/web-exclusives" hreflang="en">Web exclusives</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item">06.28.2016</div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Naomy Grand’Pierre, ’19, aims to represent Haiti at the Rio de Janeiro games.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>At the end of May, when most other undergraduates at the University of Chicago were preparing for finals, first-year Naomy Grand’Pierre hopped on a flight to Romania. It was her first time in Europe, and she took a couple of days to hang out in the malls of downtown Bucharest.</p> <p>The rest of her time was spent in a pool, trying to qualify for this summer’s <a href="https://www.olympic.org/rio-2016" target="_blank">Olympic games in Rio de Janeiro</a> in the 50-meter freestyle as a member of the Haitian swim team.</p> <p>And while she didn’t succeed there, she has her best, and last, chance this week in the Bahamas at the <a href="http://www.bahamasswimmingfederation.com/_m1791/CaribbeanIslandsSwimmingChampionships" target="_blank">Caribbean Islands Swimming Championship</a>, where she must finish in less than 26.17 seconds. Her fastest time, she says, is around a 27.6.</p> <p>[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_original","fid":"3554","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"432","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"500"}}]]</p> <p>In a sport where races are often decided by tenths of a second—the gap separating the gold and silver medalists in the 2012 Olympics was 0.23 seconds—Grand’Pierre faces a daunting task.</p> <p>Still, she’s hopeful, and training harder than ever. At the <a href="https://www.spireinstitute.org" target="_blank">SPIRE Institute</a> in Geneva, Ohio—used by swimmers from countries without their own Olympic training centers—she spends two hours in the pool every morning, followed by an hour and a half of weight lifting. Three times a week, she swims for another two hours in the afternoon.</p> <p>“It’s obviously a really fast time, but if I continue training here I should be able to get pretty close,” she said.</p> <p>Grand’Pierre’s Olympic hopes were born a couple of years ago, back in Haiti, when her mother returned home for a funeral. There, Clio Grand’Pierre met a swim club owner who told her: “I see online that your kids are pretty good. Why don’t you see what it would be like to have your daughter represent Haiti at the Olympics?”</p> <p>The idea resonated with her. Clio and her husband, Reginald, had both left Haiti for university in Canada, eventually moving to the United States and settling near Atlanta, raising their five children with dual American and Haitian citizenship. “When you leave Haiti, sometimes you forget to look back,” she said. “But when the earthquake happened in 2010, it forced a lot of Haitians to turn back home and look where we came from.”</p> <p>After speaking with the swim club owner, Clio did some research. Haiti had never had a female swimmer at the Olympics. (A male swimmer, Alain Sergile, competed in the 1996 Atlanta games.) Because she possesses dual citizenship, Naomy Grand’Pierre is eligible to swim for the island nation at the Rio de Janeiro Olympics in August.</p> <p>Initially the Grand’Pierre family thought Naomy’s status as the fastest Haitian woman in her event would allow her to compete. They later learned that she would have to meet a designated cutoff time of 26.17 to qualify.</p> <p>She’s handled the setback well, according to her UChicago coach <a href="http://athletics.uchicago.edu/sports/mswimdive/coaches/jason_weber?view=bio" target="_blank">Jason Weber</a>. “She just comes here and works well and stays really positive,” he says.</p> <p>For the Grand’Pierre family, though, there’s a greater hope than just an Olympic berth. When she was 8, Naomy started swimming lessons after Clio’s fourteen-year-old cousin drowned at a summer camp in Boston. In Haiti, two of Clio’s younger cousins also drowned, one after jumping in to save the other. And while Naomy and her siblings became competitive swimmers, Clio noted that less than 1 percent of the population of Haiti knows how to properly swim, despite it being an island.</p> <p>Clio hopes that with Naomy’s spot in the Olympics, the family will be able to raise swimming’s profile in Haiti, and hopefully save lives in the process. “My goal is to create awareness for the sport of swimming in Haiti,” said Clio. “If they see that it’s something cool to do, then we can work on raising funds to bring more pools, or start an exchange program with UChicago students. Those are the types of programs that I would like to see if we can establish.”</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/university-news" hreflang="en">University News</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/olympics" hreflang="en">Olympics</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refuchicago field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/college-students" hreflang="en">College students</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/college" hreflang="en">The College</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/uchicago-athletics" hreflang="en">UChicago Athletics</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-relatedstories field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>“<a href="http://www.uchicago.edu/features/swimmer_chases_olympic_dreams/" target="_blank">Swimmer Chases Olympic Dreams</a>” (University of Chicago News Office, 06.28.2016)</p> <p>“<a href="http://mag.uchicago.edu/law-policy-society/sports-guy" target="_self">Sports Guy</a>” (<em>University of Chicago Magazine</em>, web exclusives, 07.26.2012)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-relatedlinks field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>See pictures of <a href="https://www.facebook.com/UChicagoCollege/photos/?tab=album&amp;album_id=347861558626080" target="_blank">UChicago Olympians</a>.</p> <p>Follow UChicago Athletics (<a href="https://twitter.com/ChicagoMaroons" target="_blank">@ChicagoMaroons</a>) on Twitter.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-storymedia field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><h2 class="media-icon media-icon-video">Video</h2> <iframe width="200" height="113" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/OXxXrzVU_2k?rel=0&amp;showinfo=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><p>Naomy Grand’Pierre trains for a chance to represent Haiti at the 2016 Olympics.</p> <p> <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OXxXrzVU_2k" target="_blank" class="more-link">WATCH THE VIDEO AT YOUTUBE</a></p> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/olympic-hopeful-tries-swim-her-way-rio" data-a2a-title="Olympic hopeful tries to swim her way to Rio"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Funiversity-news%2Folympic-hopeful-tries-swim-her-way-rio&amp;title=Olympic%20hopeful%20tries%20to%20swim%20her%20way%20to%20Rio"></a></span> Tue, 28 Jun 2016 22:00:02 +0000 jmiller 5823 at https://mag.uchicago.edu A singular discovery https://mag.uchicago.edu/science-medicine/singular-discovery <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/1605_Searcy_Singular-discovery.jpg" width="1600" height="743" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/ldemanski" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">ldemanski</span></span> <span>Tue, 05/03/2016 - 14:34</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>An artist’s impression of gravitational waves generated by binary neutron stars. (Illustration by R. Hurt/Caltech-JPL)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/maureen-searcy"> <a href="/author/maureen-searcy"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Maureen Searcy</div> </a> </div> </div> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/daniel-holz-sm94-phd98"> <a href="/author/daniel-holz-sm94-phd98"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Daniel Holz, SM’94, PhD’98</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/university-chicago-magazine" hreflang="en">The University of Chicago Magazine</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item">Spring/16</div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Albert Einstein predicted the existence of gravitational waves a century ago. Daniel Holz was part of the team of scientists that finally found them last fall.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><strong>Daniel Holz</strong>, SM’94, PhD’98, is an associate professor in the Department of Physics, the Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, the Enrico Fermi Institute, the Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, and the College. He is also a member of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) collaboration, founded in 1997 to search for ripples in space-time, which would confirm a key part of Albert Einstein’s 1915 general theory of relativity.</p> <p>In September LIGO detected these gravitational waves. The discovery not only confirms Einstein’s century-old theory but also marks the beginning of a new era in astrophysics. Holz spoke to the <em>Magazine</em> about what it’s like—and what it means—to hear two black holes colliding.<em>—Maureen Searcy</em></p> <hr /><p><strong>I was in bed</strong> when I got the news. It was around 7:00 in the morning on September 14, and I was checking email before work. There was a message with the subject line, “Very interesting event.” I didn’t believe it, though. No one believed it. We test ourselves to make sure our equipment is working—there are people who secretly create fake events, and then we see if we can find them. We were in testing mode, so surely it was fake. But very quickly, within two and a half hours, we’d done preliminary analyses and it was fairly clear it was real. So by the time I got to work, I was already intrigued. By lunchtime, I was excited. By dinnertime, I was living the dream. It was real, it was happening, just like we had predicted. We had detected gravitational waves.</p> <p><strong>Einstein was right.</strong> In 1905 he developed his theory of special relativity, which, in addition to producing his equation E = mc<sup>2</sup>, defined space and time as one unified construct: a four-dimensional fabric of the universe. His theory of general relativity, published a decade later, uses the nature of space-time to explain gravity: it’s not a force but instead is the result of space-time warping around massive objects. Put a bowling ball at the center of a trampoline; the fabric will dip and wrap around its bulk. Now put a marble at the edge of the trampoline; it will roll toward the bowling ball.</p> <p>The marble isn’t pulled by the bowling ball; it’s rolling down the curvature in the trampoline caused by the bowling ball—that’s gravity. Now bounce the bowling ball; it will send ripples through the trampoline, and that’s what gravitational waves are—ripples in the fabric of space-time. It’s not just a metaphor. If you shake an actual bowling ball around, you make gravitational waves, on a tiny scale. Whenever anything accelerates, gravitational waves propagate outward, letting the rest of the universe know that something has changed. These waves travel at the speed of light and are very weakly coupled, meaning they don’t interact much with matter, so they go through everything. We’re constantly bathed in these waves. But they are very difficult to detect, even when produced by a cataclysmic event.</p> <p>For waves to be loud enough for us to hear, they must be generated from an extreme event, such as black holes or neutron stars smacking into each other at roughly light speed. The waves we detected in September were produced by two black holes crashing into each other a billion light-years away. This collision was phenomenally energetic, for a fraction of a second outshining the entire rest of the universe combined. And that was another part of Einstein’s theory, that there should be these mysterious regions of space-time with insurmountable gravity; everything falls in and can’t escape, including light. He called them singularities, which are at the center of what we now call black holes.</p> <p>For a long time people thought they weren’t real—they were some extreme, mathematical thought experiment that we could never hope to prove and that probably didn’t exist in nature. We couldn’t directly observe them as they don’t emit light. We could only infer their existence by looking at their presumed effect on the surrounding universe, the way light bends and such. By detecting gravitational waves and measuring them, we’ve shown that black holes do in fact exist, and behave the way Einstein predicted. We can only detect waves if the event occurs reasonably close to us, though. A billion light-years is really close in this language, and within this distance we think these events happen many times a year. We just needed technology advanced enough to detect them.</p> <p><strong>I’ve been studying relativity</strong> since I was an undergrad. My junior year at Princeton, we were encouraged to do a research project. I approached a professor in the physics department, John Wheeler. He had done a lot of work on black holes, actually coined the name, and was one of the legendary figures in the theory of relativity. It was intimidating. I remember standing outside his door, too nervous to go in. But I had to find an adviser—it was getting late and I was desperate. I figured, what do I have to lose? So I went in, and that’s the moment everything shifted. That first time I introduced myself, he sat me down, and I was there over two hours. I walked out with a project—on gravitational waves and black holes, no less. For the next year and a half, I worked with Wheeler nonstop; I was in his office for many hours almost every single day. It was an incredible experience.</p> <p>When I came to the University of Chicago for graduate school, my adviser was Robert Wald (Charles H. Swift Distinguished Service Professor, Department of Physics, Enrico Fermi Institute, and the College), who had been Wheeler’s student and is an expert on general relativity and black holes. I’ve been working on gravity ever since. I joined the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) collaboration a couple of years ago. I had all these questions about LIGO. I had been writing theoretical papers about gravitational waves and black holes and neutron stars and cosmology. If I really wanted to make these a reality, I should try to learn from and contribute to the effort to detect gravitational waves. So I joined the collaboration.</p> <p><strong>LIGO is the most sensitive instrument</strong> ever built by mankind. It consists of twin detectors, one in Livingston, Louisiana, and the other in Hanford, Washington. These devices act like antennae to detect gravitational waves, using lasers to register even the slightest “wiggle” in space-time. If both detectors, separated by thousands of miles, wiggle in a predictable way at about the same time, we know it’s a wave event and not caused by some local disturbance. When LIGO was proposed in the early ’90s, people thought it was crazy, that taxpayer money shouldn’t fund it because it was impossible. The instrument can’t possibly be sensitive enough. And if it is, what if gravitational waves aren’t even real? Or what if there are no sources of gravitational waves loud enough for us to hear?</p> <p>But LIGO was built, and it works. We could have been waiting a long time to find out if it worked because we weren’t sure how frequently these powerful events happened. I coauthored a series of papers saying they should be fairly common, that we’d see an event maybe once a month or so. We found something just a few days after turning on. One resounding detection. Gravitational waves aren’t sound waves—they’re not compression waves in the air—but they have similar properties. You can take the gravitational waveform and put it directly into speakers. So we did that, and it sounds like a thump. You can hear it with your unaided ear, even with the noise. We expected most of the sources to be very difficult to hear, but this one was really loud. That’s part of the reason we’re so confident. It’s beautiful and perfect.</p> <p><strong>The LIGO collaboration is enormous.</strong> The discovery paper, published in February, has 1,004 coauthors. The UChicago contingent includes myself; Ben Farr, a postdoctoral McCormick Fellow in the Enrico Fermi Institute; astronomy graduate student Hsin-Yu Chen; and physics graduate student Zoheyr Doctor. Part of the research we do involves deciphering the waveforms. We detect something, and then we ask, well, what was that? You have to turn the data into a statement: that was two black holes, each 30 times the mass of the sun, merging a billion light-years away in that part of the sky. We help figure that out.</p> <p>Now that we’ve detected gravitational waves, now that we know they’re real, we can start probing questions about the evolution of the universe, how stars live and die, how black holes form. This discovery opens the door to so much astrophysical and cosmological exploration. This feeling is hard to describe. It’s something I’ve been working on essentially my entire career. You spend all this time searching for something, and then suddenly you hear it; the event is in your data, loud and clear. It’s a moving experience. Even now, it gives me goose bumps to think about it. I see a plot of our results, and I just can’t help but smile.<em>—Daniel Holz, SM’94, PhD’98</em></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/science-medicine" hreflang="en">Science &amp; Medicine</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/black-holes" hreflang="en">Black holes</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/gravitational-waves" hreflang="en">gravitational waves</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/physics" hreflang="en">Physics</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refuchicago field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/physical-sciences-division" hreflang="en">Physical Sciences Division</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-relatedstories field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>“<a href="http://news.uchicago.edu/article/2016/02/11/gravitational-waves-detected-100-years-after-einstein-s-prediction">Gravitational Waves Detected 100 Years after Einstein’s Prediction</a>” (University of Chicago News Office, 02.11.2016)</p> <p>“<a href="http://www.uchicago.edu/features/drawing_inspiration_from_the_classroom/">Drawing Inspiration from the Classroom</a>” (University of Chicago News Office, 06.01.2015)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-relatedlinks field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Learn more about <a href="http://danielholz.com/danielholz/home.html">Daniel Holz</a>.</p> <p>Explore LIGO’s <a href="https://www.ligo.caltech.edu">website</a>.</p> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/science-medicine/singular-discovery" data-a2a-title="A singular discovery"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Fscience-medicine%2Fsingular-discovery&amp;title=A%20singular%20discovery"></a></span> Tue, 03 May 2016 19:34:48 +0000 ldemanski 5620 at https://mag.uchicago.edu Rosenwald redux https://mag.uchicago.edu/arts-humanities/rosenwald-redux <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/1511_Golus_Rosenwald-redux.jpg" width="1600" height="743" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/jmiller" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">jmiller</span></span> <span>Fri, 11/20/2015 - 08:16</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Julius Rosenwald with students from a Rosenwald school. (Courtesy Fisk University)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/carrie-golus-ab91-am93"> <a href="/author/carrie-golus-ab91-am93"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Carrie Golus, AB’91, AM’93</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/university-chicago-magazine" hreflang="en">The University of Chicago Magazine</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item">11.20.2015</div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>A new documentary on philanthropist Julius Rosenwald leaves UChicago on the cutting room floor.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>There’s a lot to know about <a href="http://www.lib.uchicago.edu/e/webexhibits/building/rosenwald.html" target="_blank">Julius Rosenwald</a> (1862–1932), the <a href="http://www.sears.com" target="_blank">Sears</a> executive who gave away $62 million, and yet he is all but forgotten today. <em><a href="http://www.rosenwaldfilm.org" target="_blank">Rosenwald</a></em>, a new documentary by Aviva Kempner, tries to put this right.</p> <p>The film includes only a passing mention of the University of Chicago, one of the few places where Rosenwald’s name is preserved. A University trustee, he celebrated his 50th&nbsp;birthday in 1912 by making a gift of $250,000—about $6 million in today’s money.</p> <p>The University used the money for a building to house the geology and geography departments, naming it Rosenwald Hall in his honor. Except he didn’t want the honor. The building had been named when he was “in the Orient,” he wrote to the University later, “and I felt that it would have been extremely discourteous for me to ask to have it changed.”</p> <p> <h5>[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_original","fid":"3113","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"393","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"500"}}]] Rosenwald Hall under construction. (University of Chicago Photographic Archive, <a href="http://photoarchive.lib.uchicago.edu/db.xqy?keywords=apf2-07052" target="_blank">apf2-07052</a>, Special Collections Research Center, University of Chicago Library)</h5> </p> <p>Rosenwald was hugely important to the success of the University in its early days. He led the first major fundraising campaign. He helped raise more than $5 million as a trustee. He facilitated the merger that resulted in the <a href="https://www.ssa.uchicago.edu" target="_blank">School of Social Service Administration</a>.</p> <p>But <em>Rosenwald</em> doesn’t have time for any of that. The man just did too much.</p> <p>Instead, the film focuses on the schools that he built for African American children across the rural South. A canny philanthropist as well as a businessman, Rosenwald offered these communities matching grants. A third of the money for each school came from the Rosenwald Foundation, a third from the white community (usually state education funds), and a third from the black community.</p> <p>It’s difficult to overstate the importance of Rosenwald’s role in educating African Americans of that generation. Beginning in 1913, more than 5,000 schools were built.</p> <p>By 1932, one out of every three black children in the rural South attended a Rosenwald school. The buildings remained in use until the <a href="http://www.supremecourt.gov" target="_blank">Supreme Court</a> ordered schools to be desegregated in the 1950s.</p> <p>“We thought it was a beautiful school,” the late <a href="http://mayaangelou.com" target="_blank">Maya Angelou</a>—probably the most famous Rosenwald school alum—says in the film. “Lafayette County Training School.”</p> <p>The second half of <em>Rosenwald</em> focuses mainly on the Rosenwald Fund Fellowship Program, which provided grants to African American artists and intellectuals. A short list of recipients: writers Ralph Ellison, Langston Hughes, and Zora Neale Hurston; photographer <a href="http://news.uchicago.edu/article/2015/10/23/uchicago-community-celebrates-gordon-parks-arts-hall" target="_blank">Gordon Parks</a>; and UChicago’s own <a href="https://www.lib.uchicago.edu/e/webexhibits/IntegratingTheLifeOfTheMind/AlbertAndKatherineDunham.html" target="_blank">Katherine Dunham</a>, PhB’36, dancer and anthropologist.</p> <p>Rosenwald himself never finished high school. He got his start selling men’s clothing and then formed a business relationship with Sears. Eventually he became president of the company and one of the richest men in the United States.</p> <p>Rosenwald’s philanthropy came out of the Jewish ideal of <em>tikkun olam</em> (repairing the world), as well as a deep sense of identification with African Americans as a persecuted minority.</p> <p>“He did not have to care about black people,” civil rights activist <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/17/us/julian-bond-former-naacp-chairman-and-civil-rights-leader-dies-at-75.html" target="_blank">Julian Bond</a> says in the film. “But he did.”</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/arts-humanities" hreflang="en">Arts &amp; Humanities</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-refuchicago field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/university-history-0" hreflang="en">University history</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-relatedstories field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>“<a href="http://magazine.uchicago.edu/0606/peer/book.shtml" target="_blank">Open Book: Review of <em>Julius Rosenwald</em> by Peter M. Ascoli, AB’64</a>” (<em>University of Chicago Magazine</em>, June/06) “<a href="http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/ct-julius-rosenwald-philanthropist-per-flashback-20151029-story.html" target="_blank">Chicago Philanthropist Julius Rosenwald’s Dollars and Sense</a>” (<em>Chicago Tribune</em>, 10.30.2015)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-relatedlinks field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Learn more about the <em><a href="http://www.rosenwaldfilm.org/" target="_blank">Rosenwald</a></em> film. Check out the <a href="https://www.lib.uchicago.edu/e/scrc/findingaids/view.php?eadid=ICU.SPCL.ROSENWALDJ" target="_blank">Julius Rosenwald papers</a> at University of Chicago Special Collections Research Center. <a href="http://campaign.uchicago.edu/priorities/uei/" target="_blank">Join the campaign</a> and support the Urban Education Institute’s ambitious mission to produce knowledge to create reliably excellent urban schooling nationwide.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-storymedia field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><h2 class="media-icon media-icon-video">Video</h2> <iframe width="200" height="113" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/LyLWd5F3CPQ?rel=0&amp;showinfo=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><p><em>Rosenwald</em> is a documentary about Chicago philanthropist Julius Rosenwald.</p> <p> <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LyLWd5F3CPQ" target="_blank" class="more-link">WATCH THE TRAILER AT YOUTUBE</a></p> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/arts-humanities/rosenwald-redux" data-a2a-title="Rosenwald redux"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Farts-humanities%2Frosenwald-redux&amp;title=Rosenwald%20redux"></a></span> Fri, 20 Nov 2015 14:16:23 +0000 jmiller 5223 at https://mag.uchicago.edu How can you be happier? https://mag.uchicago.edu/arts-humanities/how-can-you-be-happier <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/1511_Chung_Happiness.jpg" width="1600" height="743" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/jmiller" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">jmiller</span></span> <span>Sun, 11/15/2015 - 13:38</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>(<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/barnimages/22395210581" target="_blank">Photography</a> by Barn Images, CC0 1.0)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/jeanie-chung"> <a href="/author/jeanie-chung"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Jeanie Chung</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/web-exclusives" hreflang="en">Web exclusives</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item">11.16.2015</div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Philosophy professor Candace Vogler is on the case.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>What role does happiness play in human life?</p> <p>Is humility a worthwhile virtue? Or is it a form of weakness?</p> <p>How can we even think about—let alone achieve—virtue, happiness, or meaning while leading frantic work and personal lives?</p> <p>Over the next two years, <a href="http://philosophy.uchicago.edu/faculty/vogler.html" target="_blank">Candace Vogler</a>, the David B. and Clara E. Stern Professor in <a href="http://philosophy.uchicago.edu" target="_blank">Philosophy</a>, will try to answer these questions. Vogler and <a href="http://artsandsciences.sc.edu/phil/jennifer-frey" target="_blank">Jennifer A. Frey</a> of the <a href="http://www.sc.edu" target="_blank">University of South Carolina</a> will lead a team of philosophers, psychologists, and religious thinkers on a quest to understand what life is really about.</p> <p>Their project, <a href="http://virtue.uchicago.edu/" target="_blank">Virtue, Happiness, and the Meaning of Life</a> was launched on Humanities Day to a full house at the <a href="https://neubauercollegium.uchicago.edu" target="_blank">Neubauer Collegium for Culture and Society</a>. Last month, the project received a $2.1 million grant from the <a href="https://www.templeton.org" target="_blank">John Templeton Foundation</a>.</p> <p>Vogler and Frey do not consider virtue, happiness, and the meaning of life to be the same thing—but do consider them related.</p> <p>They will present their findings through various academic channels, including two new courses taught by visiting scholars in spring 2016 and spring 2017.</p> <p>However, as Vogler said, “We want this to stay in touch with ordinary human beings” and not just academics. With that in mind, here are four ideas from her <a href="https://humanitiesday.uchicago.edu" target="_blank">Humanities Day</a> lecture—some of which admittedly may not be news—about leading a meaningful life:</p> <p><strong>1. Go for the greater good</strong>. Vogler said self-transcendence, “the need to be connected to something bigger,” as opposed to focusing on individual success, is crucial to finding meaning and happiness. The project hopes to develop tools to actually measure this quality.</p> <p><strong>2. Thomas Aquinas: not just for Catholics anymore</strong>. Most philosophical studies of happiness and virtue begin with Aristotle. But Vogler and Frey take the 13th-century theologian as their foundational philosopher. They point out that scholars of all—or no—faiths consider Aquinas “a serious moral philosopher,” and that Aquinas had a less elitist idea about who could lead virtuous lives. “It’s not just Athenian generals,” Vogler said.</p> <p><strong>3. Surprise! Money can’t buy happiness</strong>, says <a href="http://thevirtueblog.com/2015/10/21/does-money-buy-happiness/" target="_blank">one early entry</a> on the project’s <em><a href="http://thevirtueblog.com" target="_blank">Virtue Blog</a></em>.</p> <p><strong>4. Spoiler alert: it’ll probably take more than two years.</strong> The project’s main goal is to seed future research and to get in the conversation, in both an academic and broadly cultural sense. “Ideas matter,” Frey said.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/arts-humanities" hreflang="en">Arts &amp; Humanities</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/philosophy" hreflang="en">Philosophy</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/psychology" hreflang="en">Psychology</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/humanities-day" hreflang="en">Humanities Day</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refuchicago field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/divinity-school" hreflang="en">Divinity School</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/humanities-division" hreflang="en">Division of the Humanities</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/neubauer-collegium-culture-and-society-0" hreflang="en">Neubauer Collegium for Culture and Society</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-relatedstories field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>“<a href="http://news.uchicago.edu/article/2015/10/07/collaborative-research-project-examine-sources-happiness-and-personal-fulfillment" target="_blank">Collaborative Research Project to Examine Sources of Happiness and Personal Fulfillment</a>” (University of Chicago News Office, 10.07.2015)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-relatedlinks field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Read stories on <em><a href="http://thevirtueblog.com" target="_blank">The Virtue Blog</a></em>. Visit the <a href="http://virtue.uchicago.edu/" target="_blank">Virtue, Happiness, and the Meaning of Life website.</a> Visit the <a href="https://neubauercollegium.uchicago.edu" target="_blank">Neubauer Collegium for Culture and Society website</a>. Learn more about <a href="http://humanitiesday.uchicago.edu" target="_blank">Humanities Day</a>. <a href="http://campaign.uchicago.edu/priorities/humanities/unite-scholars-across-disciplines-at-the-neubauer-collegium/" target="_blank">Join the campaign</a> and help unite scholars across disciplines.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-storymedia field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><h2 class="media-icon media-icon-video">Video</h2> <iframe width="200" height="113" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/EBkZRDFf2is?rel=0&amp;showinfo=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><p>Principal investigators Candace Vogler and Jennifer A. Frey present Virtue, Happiness, and the Meaning of Life: A Collaboration at Humanities Day 2015.</p> <p> <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EBkZRDFf2is" target="_blank" class="more-link">WATCH THE VIDEO AT YOUTUBE</a></p> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/arts-humanities/how-can-you-be-happier" data-a2a-title="How can you be happier?"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Farts-humanities%2Fhow-can-you-be-happier&amp;title=How%20can%20you%20be%20happier%3F"></a></span> Sun, 15 Nov 2015 19:38:59 +0000 jmiller 5212 at https://mag.uchicago.edu Hard hat tour: Campus North Residential Commons https://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/hard-hat-tour-campus-north-residential-commons <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/1510_Golus_Campus-north-1.jpg" width="1600" height="743" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/jmiller" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">jmiller</span></span> <span>Tue, 11/03/2015 - 10:12</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item">A rendering of UChicago’s newest undergraduate residential commons. (Illustration courtesy Studio Gang Architects)</div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/carrie-golus-ab91-am93"> <a href="/author/carrie-golus-ab91-am93"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Carrie Golus, AB’91, AM’93</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/web-exclusives" hreflang="en">Web exclusives</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item"><p>11.03.2015</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item">No hard hat required.</div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item">On 55th Street and University Avenue—the former site of Pierce Tower, RIP—Campus North Residential Commons is coming along nicely. Designed by <a href="http://studiogang.com/" target="_blank">Jeanne Gang</a>, the building will be home to 800 undergrads next fall. <h5>[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_original","fid":"3014","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"357","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"500"}}]] (Illustration courtesy Studio Gang Architects)</h5> Each of the Campus North Residential Commons buildings has a unique configuration. (Buildings are shown next to each other for height comparison. See model below for how the buildings will be arranged.) The resident masters’ apartment is in Building A. Building B is the dining commons. Building C features a music practice room and a classroom. The buildings are connected by raised courtyards. <p align="center"><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/hr.png" /></p> <h5>[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_original","fid":"3015","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"357","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"500"}}]] (Illustration courtesy Studio Gang Architects)</h5> As this model shows, the new residence hall stands north of Henry Crown Field House (top right). The shortest building, the dining commons, has a green roof. <p align="center"><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/hr.png" /></p> <h5>[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_original","fid":"3016","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"685","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"500"}}]] (Photography by Carrie Golus, AM’91, AM’93)</h5> The tallest of the four buildings, which runs along 55th Street, is 15 stories. <p align="center"><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/hr.png" /></p> <h5>[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_original","fid":"3017","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"685","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"500"}}]] (Photography by Carrie Golus, AM’91, AM’93)</h5> Curving slabs of concrete, three stories high, are cast off site and then welded to the building. Each slab weighs seven tons. <p align="center"><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/hr.png" /></p> <h5>[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_original","fid":"3018","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"685","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"500"}}]] (Photography by Carrie Golus, AM’91, AM’93)</h5> Hard hats, safety vests (with the motto “zero injuries” on the back), and sturdy shoes are required to enter the site. <p align="center"><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/hr.png" /></p> <h5>[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_original","fid":"3019","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"685","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"500"}}]] (Photography by Carrie Golus, AM’91, AM’93)</h5> Campus North will include eight houses, with 100 students each. Each house is three stories, connected by a three-story lounge. <p align="center"><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/hr.png" /></p> <h5>[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_original","fid":"3021","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"379","style":"font-size: 1.077em; line-height: 1.538em;","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"500"}}]]<span style="font-size: 1.077em; line-height: 1.538em;"> (Photography by Carrie Golus, AM’91, AM’93)</span></h5> Two hundred construction workers were employed at the site when the school year began. About 350 will work on it altogether. Ten percent of the workers are women. <p align="center"><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/hr.png" /></p> <h5>[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_original","fid":"3022","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"379","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"500"}}]] (Photography by Carrie Golus, AM’91, AM’93)</h5> Looking north from the 15th floor, you get a view of downtown. <p align="center"><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/hr.png" /></p> <h5>[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_original","fid":"3023","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"379","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"500"}}]] (Photography by Carrie Golus, AM’91, AM’93)</h5> Looking south, a view of the curved dining commons from the 15th floor. <p align="center"><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/hr.png" /></p> <h5>[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_original","fid":"3024","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"247","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"500"}}]] (Illustration courtesy Studio Gang Architects)</h5> When complete, the building will include a restaurant and other businesses along 55th Street. <p align="center"><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/hr.png" /></p> <h5>[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_original","fid":"3025","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"567","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"500"}}]] (Illustration courtesy Studio Gang Architects)</h5> Campus North is scheduled to welcome its first College students in the fall 2016.</div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/university-news" hreflang="en">University News</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/housing" hreflang="en">Housing</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/construction" hreflang="en">Construction</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refuchicago field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/college-students" hreflang="en">College students</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/college" hreflang="en">The College</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refformats field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/formats/photography" hreflang="en">Photography</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-relatedstories field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item">“<a href="../university-news/due-north" target="_self">Due North</a>” (<em>University of Chicago Magazine</em>, Sept-Oct/13)</div> <div class="field field--name-field-relatedlinks field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item">Follow @<a href="http://twitter.com/UChicagoHousing" target="_blank">UChicagoHousing</a> and @<a href="http://twitter.com/StudioGang" target="_blank">StudioGang</a>. <a href="http://campaign.uchicago.edu/priorities/college/creating-a-vibrant-campus-community/" target="_blank">Join the campaign</a> and help the College build opportunities for students as they engage in a creative community of learning and socialize around their shared passion for the power of ideas.</div> <div class="field field--name-field-storymedia field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><h2 class="media-icon media-icon-video">Video</h2> <iframe width="200" height="113" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Wo9cMXEbB1E?rel=0&amp;showinfo=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><p>A fly-through tour of Campus North Residential Commons.</p> <p> <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wo9cMXEbB1E" target="_blank" class="more-link">WATCH THE VIDEO AT YOUTUBE</a></p> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/hard-hat-tour-campus-north-residential-commons" data-a2a-title="Hard hat tour: Campus North Residential Commons"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Funiversity-news%2Fhard-hat-tour-campus-north-residential-commons&amp;title=Hard%20hat%20tour%3A%20Campus%20North%20Residential%20Commons"></a></span> Tue, 03 Nov 2015 16:12:32 +0000 jmiller 5156 at https://mag.uchicago.edu