Social Media https://mag.uchicago.edu/tags/social-media en Ant hero https://mag.uchicago.edu/science-medicine/ant-hero <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/1705_Allen_Ant-hero.jpg" width="1600" height="743" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/jmiller" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">jmiller</span></span> <span>Tue, 05/09/2017 - 09:48</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Growing up, Benjamin Blanchard’s parents got him a book on insects. It was “off to the races from there,” he says. (Photography by Jean Lachat)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/susie-allen-ab09"> <a href="/author/susie-allen-ab09"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Susie Allen, AB’09</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/university-chicago-magazine" hreflang="en">The University of Chicago Magazine</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item">Spring/17</div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Graduate student Benjamin Blanchard’s enthusiasm about ants fuels his scientific research.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>In December journalist and <em>Jezebel</em> editor in chief Emma Carmichael scanned her in‑box and discovered the message she would later dub her “favorite email of 2016.”</p> <p>The missive from UChicago graduate student&nbsp;Benjamin Blanchard&nbsp;explained that he was “trying to gather statements on ants from influential thinkers of our time. So, could you please provide an answer to this question: ‘What is your favorite thing about ants?’”</p> <p>Carmichael posted a screenshot of the message on Twitter. “If i don’t get back to your email for a few days,” she wrote, “it’s [because] i’m still figuring out how to respond to this one.” Her <a href="https://twitter.com/emmacargo/status/809112736567271424" target="_blank">tweet</a> went (modestly) viral—as of this writing, it had been retweeted by nearly a thousand people, and liked more than 4,300 times.</p> <h5><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/1705_Allen_Ant-hero_spotA.jpg" width="500"><br>Golden-tailed spiny ant. (<a href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Golden-tailed_Spiny_Ant_(6017256569).jpg" target="_blank">Photography</a> by John Tann, CC BY 2.0)</h5> <p>Months later Blanchard, a student in the <a href="https://evbio.uchicago.edu" target="_blank">Committee on Evolutionary Biology</a>, remains both bemused by and slightly incredulous at the online response Carmichael’s tweet provoked. (He’s also careful not to overstate the scale of the attention. “I don’t know if I would go as far to say it was fully viral,” he says.) Mostly he’s happy the email allowed him to talk about his love of ants with a wider audience. On Twitter he bantered with Carmichael and others about his insect research—and his hope that other public figures he’d written to would respond.</p> <p>In person Blanchard is as earnest and knowledgeable about ants as his email would suggest. He provides a rapid-fire overview of some of the most interesting ant species: the trap-jaw ant has “these crazy, really, really superpowered jaws—that’s actually the fastest self-directed motion of any known animal.” His adviser, lecturer <a href="https://microbiome.uchicago.edu/directory/corrie-moreau" target="_blank">Corrie Moreau</a>, studies the turtle ant, which has an odd circular head that can be used to block the entrance to its nest. In human terms, “it’d be like if our heads were rectangular and we sat all day with our heads in the door,” Blanchard says.</p> <h5><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/1705_Allen_Ant-hero_spotB.jpg" width="500"><br>Spiny ant. (<a href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Spiny_Ant_(Polyrhachis_armata)_(8086455178).jpg" target="_blank">Photography</a> by Bernard Dupont, CC BY 2.0)</h5> <p>Blanchard has a particular soft spot for the “truly amazing” genus he studies, the <em>Polyrhachis</em> (“many-spined”) ants. The 700 species in the group have different kinds and numbers of defensive spines, which, up close, look a little like rose thorns protruding from the thorax. Blanchard wants to understand why such a diverse range of spines evolved and how these spines influence the species’ relationships to their habitats and to other ants. He’s also working to establish an updated phylogeny—an evolutionary tree of life—for the spiny ant group.</p> <p>In the first chapter of his dissertation, which was <a href="http://evbio.uchicago.edu/site/news/defensive_traits_exhibit_an_evolutionary_trade_off/" target="_blank">recently published</a> in the journal <em>Evolution</em>, Blanchard looked at the development of ant defense mechanisms. He hypothesized that certain defensive traits would exhibit what’s called an evolutionary trade-off—as Blanchard defines it, “a negative correlation across species between different traits that serve similar functions.” And indeed, using statistical analysis, he found that ant species appear to make a choice, so to speak, between developing a chemical sting and other defensive traits, such as spines, large eyes, and large colony size.</p> <h5><img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/1705_Allen_Ant-hero_spotC.jpg" width="500"><br>Golden-tailed spiny ant. (<a href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Golden-tailed_Spiny_Ant_.Polyrhachis_ammon._-_Flickr_-_gailhampshire_(1).jpg" target="_blank">Photography</a> by Gail Hampshire, CC BY 2.0</h5> <p>The paper also showed that the evolutionary decision to forgo a sting allows for the development of many other types of defensive traits, leading to an explosion of new ant species. In evolutionary biology, the question of how much evolutionary trade-offs contribute to species diversity is an open one, and Blanchard hopes his work will inform the conversation. (Many other factors might also contribute, such as decreases in predation and the development of very specialized ecological niches.)</p> <p>This summer Blanchard will return to his field site in southern China, which is home to a large number of spiny ant species. He’ll be looking at how different lengths of spines and numbers of spines affect ants’ ability to survive, both against predators and in competition with other ant species. There’s already some evidence that longer hooklike spines get caught uncomfortably in the mouths of large predators such as frogs; shorter spines may be more effective against smaller predators, like spiders, or allow for greater agility. It’s also possible there’s an evolutionary trajectory toward longer spines because smaller ones aren’t very useful for defense at all.</p> <p>In addition to exposing ants to predators, Blanchard’s research involves putting different spiny ant species together with a shared food resource and seeing which colony withstands the ecological pressure. “Hopefully it’s a somewhat realistic test of what they do in nature,” he explains.</p> <p>Blanchard traces his interest in ants to an insect book his parents bought for him when he was a child. He was struck, then as now, by the similarities between ants and humans. The way ants tend minute sap-sucking insects called aphids is, he says, “indistinguishable” from how humans herd cows. And like ours, their social behavior runs the gamut from heroic self-sacrifice to warfare. “It’s not just a layperson thing” to see ourselves&nbsp;in ants.</p> <p>Those similarities, Blanchard thinks, may explain why humans have been studying and writing about ants so consistently and for so long. Alongside his scientific research, he’s been compiling a database of ant quotes and references that he hopes someday to turn into a book; the oldest entry is from 2500 BC.</p> <p>And he’s continued to gather more material from the email solicitation he sent to Carmichael and around 50 others. (Carmichael did write back, noting that “ants work their butts off at all times for the greater good of their species.”) Psychologist Steven Pinker said his favorite thing about ants was their altruism. Writer Natasha Vargas-Cooper replied at length explaining that ants are in a constant state of revolution. Politician Dennis Kucinich sent a three-word response: “They are organized.”</p> <h5><em>Updated: 05.19.2017</em></h5> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/science-medicine" hreflang="en">Science &amp; Medicine</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/ants" hreflang="en">Ants</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/social-media" hreflang="en">Social Media</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-relatedlinks field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p><strong>Visit</strong> Blanchard’s blog <a href="https://dailyant.com/author/benjamindblanchard/"><em>Daily Ant</em></a>. <strong>Follow</strong> Blanchard (<a href="https://twitter.com/bendblanchard">@BenDBlanchard</a>) on Twitter.</p> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/science-medicine/ant-hero" data-a2a-title="Ant hero"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Fscience-medicine%2Fant-hero&amp;title=Ant%20hero"></a></span> Tue, 09 May 2017 14:48:29 +0000 jmiller 6438 at https://mag.uchicago.edu Power tweeters https://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/power-tweeters <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/1510_Golus_Twitter.jpg" width="1600" height="743" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/jmiller" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">jmiller</span></span> <span>Wed, 10/07/2015 - 15:57</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Cupcakes for hashtags. (<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/quinnanya/5670438068/in/photolist-9D5tFA-9D2z1g-9fB4vy-9gHoim-7ZDR4v-bVfhEg-7yTm7i-dSTXKP-dUieuW-8G7e2R-ocofUy-anN8tm-9F3WVD-oUwMdv-9fsZmu-aDGQh6-7ZDT7g-b3uhnn-dTFSxT-emtry7-9ff6eB-9foQjP-9GNG3F-9fge5w-o7yTut-b6kKbz-9Gx3AP-9t987Z-9ftwUa-bH6Y1H-cdvTXY-8yQtot-ch2nz3-yVEZkS-avCM9P-kMc2Jw-8YYUq7-ePETVe-dNS6vH-aEjP9H-j6uFp7-bWtvFe-xFnqBL-8xgcgj-bWLm6X-oQPBAp-emtrBy-93fo8e-bDU3os-i34ZNr" target="_blank">Photography</a> by Quinn Dombrowski, AB’06, AM’06, CC BY-SA 2.0)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/carrie-golus-ab91-am93"> <a href="/author/carrie-golus-ab91-am93"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Carrie Golus, AB’91, AM’93</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/web-exclusives" hreflang="en">Web exclusives</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item">10.08.2015</div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Four professors, an alumnus, and an intern on how and why they tweet.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Like many Twitter users, <a href="http://twitter.com/carriegolus" target="_blank">I’ve been lurking</a> silently for years, mostly out of fear. But lots of <a href="https://twitter.com/UChicago/lists/faculty" target="_blank">faculty</a>, <a href="https://twitter.com/UChicagoAlumni/lists/uchicago-alumni" target="_blank">alumni</a>, and students are made of sterner stuff—including the six interviewed below, who have a combined 135,000 Twitter followers.</p> <hr /><h2><a href="http://www.twitter.com/neuroMOOC" target="_blank"><img align="right" hspace="10" src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/neuroMOOC.jpg" width="60" /></a><strong><a href="http://www.twitter.com/neuroMOOC" target="_blank">@neuroMOOC</a></strong></h2> <h3><strong>Peggy Mason</strong></h3> <p>Professor, <a href="https://neurobiology.uchicago.edu" target="_blank">Department of Neurobiology</a></p> <hr /><h2><a href="http://www.twitter.com/haroldpollack" target="_blank"><img align="right" hspace="10" src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/haroldpollack.jpg" width="60" /><strong>@haroldpollack</strong></a></h2> <h3><strong>Harold Pollack</strong></h3> <p>Helen Ross Professor and Deputy Dean for Research and Faculty Development, <a href="https://www.ssa.uchicago.edu" target="_blank">School of Social Service Administration</a></p> <p>Coauthor of <em><a href="https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/26031249-the-index-card" target="_blank">The Index Card: Why Personal Finance Does Not Have to Be Complicated</a></em> (Portfolio, forthcoming), based on an actual index card that <a href="http://mag.uchicago.edu/economics-business/financial-brief">went viral in 2013</a></p> <hr /><h2><a href="http://www.twitter.com/NeilShubin" target="_blank"><img align="right" hspace="10" src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/NeilShubin.jpg" width="60" /></a><strong><a href="http://www.twitter.com/NeilShubin" target="_blank">@NeilShubin</a></strong></h2> <h3><strong>Neil Shubin</strong></h3> <p>Robert R. Bensley Professor and Associate Dean, <a href="http://pondside.uchicago.edu/oba/" target="_blank">Department of Organismal Biology and Anatomy</a></p> <p>Author of <em><a href="https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1662160.Your_Inner_Fish" target="_blank">Your Inner Fish: A Journey into the 3.5-Billion-Year History of the Human Body</a></em> (Pantheon, 2008) and <em><a href="https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/13641922-the-universe-within" target="_blank">The Universe Within: Discovering the Common History of Rocks, Planets, and People</a></em> (Pantheon, 2013)</p> <hr /><h2><a href="http://www.twitter.com/R_Thaler" target="_blank"><img align="right" hspace="10" src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/R_Thaler.jpg" width="60" /></a><strong><a href="http://www.twitter.com/R_Thaler" target="_blank">@R_Thaler</a></strong></h2> <h3><strong>Richard H. Thaler</strong></h3> <p>Charles R. Walgreen Distinguished Service Professor of Behavioral Science and Economics, <a href="http://www.chicagobooth.edu" target="_blank">Chicago Booth</a></p> <p>Coauthor of <em><a href="https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2527900.Nudge" target="_blank">Nudge: Improving Decisions about Health, Wealth, and Happiness</a></em> (Yale University Press, 2008) and author of <em><a href="https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/23316488-misbehaving" target="_blank">Misbehaving: The Making of Behavioral Economics</a></em> (W. W. Norton and Company, 2015)</p> <hr /><h2><a href="http://www.twitter.com/scalzi" target="_blank"><img align="right" hspace="10" src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/scalzi.jpg" width="60" /></a><strong><a href="http://www.twitter.com/scalzi" target="_blank">@scalzi</a></strong></h2> <h3><strong>John Scalzi</strong>, AB’91</h3> <p>Science fiction writer; latest book is <em><a href="https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/23168809-the-end-of-all-things" target="_blank">The End of All Things</a></em> (Tor Books, 2015)</p> <hr /><h3><a href="http://www.twitter.com/gittlz" target="_blank"><img align="right" hspace="10" src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/gittlz.jpg" width="60" /></a><strong>Hannah Gitlin</strong>, tweets privately under a pseudonym</h3> <p>Class of 2016; <em>University of Chicago Magazine</em> intern</p> <hr /><h2><strong>Why did you start tweeting?</strong></h2> <p><strong>Pollack</strong>: I had a private Twitter account for a while. Eventually it became too much of a pain to decide who I was willing to let in. I started to inadvertently insult people. So I decided to make it public.</p> <p><strong>Shubin</strong>: When my miniseries (<em><a href="http://www.pbs.org/your-inner-fish/home/" target="_blank">Your Inner Fish</a></em>) aired on PBS last year, the folks there asked if I would live tweet during the broadcast. The idea struck me as strange, but almost immediately I heard from college and high school teachers who wanted their students to tweet questions. We were the lead trending item on Twitter for two of the three nights of broadcast.</p> <p><strong>Mason</strong>: I was preparing to <a href="https://www.coursera.org/course/neurobio" target="_blank">offer a MOOC</a> (massive open online course) and my producer, <a href="https://twitter.com/adarel?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor" target="_blank">Emily Joy Bembeneck</a>, said I had to get on Twitter. It’s definitely an acquired taste. I use it to talk with my Neuro MOOC students and share neuro things. The other categories I permit myself to write about are cats, the environment, and science.</p> <p><strong>Scalzi</strong>: When a new social network starts up, I immediately go and try to get the Scalzi screen name. It sounds ridiculous, but it’s useful. Twitter and Facebook were coming up at the same time, while Instant Messenger and MySpace were going down. If I wanted to continue to talk to my friends and/or procrastinate my work, I had to get on Twitter.</p> <p><strong>Gitlin</strong>: I joined in 2012 as a senior in high school, but it took me a long time after that to really get into it.</p> <p><strong>Thaler</strong>: Some friends suggested I try it. At the beginning I mostly used it as a news feed.</p> <h2><strong>Do you remember your first tweet?</strong></h2> <p><strong>Pollack</strong>: I do not. Probably “Hi, it’s me, I’m on Twitter.”</p> <p><strong>Scalzi</strong>: I signed up on Easter. I believe it was “So much ham.”</p> <p><strong>Mason</strong>: It was on Halloween. “It takes a brain to feel scared.”</p> <p><strong>Gitlin</strong>: Probably like “<a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/hashtag?src=hash" target="_blank">#Hashtag</a>” or something similarly unfunny with aspirations of meta.</p> <h2><strong>How many times do you tweet per day/week? What affects the frequency? </strong></h2> <p><strong>Pollack</strong>: It’s embarrassing. I tweet a lot. I tweet in bursts.</p> <p><strong>Scalzi</strong>: I have special tools because I’m a verified user. Let’s see. <span style="line-height: 1.538em;">Monday, July 27: <span style="text-decoration: underline;">53</span>; </span><span style="line-height: 1.538em;">Tuesday, July 28: <span style="text-decoration: underline;">74</span>; </span><span style="line-height: 1.538em;">Wednesday, July 29: <span style="text-decoration: underline;">72</span>; </span><span style="line-height: 1.538em;">Thursday, July 30: <span style="text-decoration: underline;">86</span>; </span><span style="line-height: 1.538em;">Friday, July 31: <span style="text-decoration: underline;">40</span>. </span><span style="line-height: 1.538em;">On average, more than 50 times a day. On July 19, in the last 28 days, I tweeted 167 times. I don’t even know what I was doing.</span></p> <p><strong>Thaler</strong>: Most of my tweets are really retweets.</p> <h2><strong>What do you like about Twitter?</strong></h2> <p><strong>Mason</strong>: It has no creep factor. No one is asking to be “friends” with you.</p> <p><strong>Pollack</strong>: My favorite use of Twitter is complimenting people. All of my TAs and many of my students follow me covertly. So I can say something nice about one of my TAs and they can forward it to their mom.</p> <p><strong>Thaler</strong>: Twitter is probably at its best during a news event, such as presidential debates, where you can get real time commentary and jokes during the commercials.</p> <h2><strong>Ever had a Twitter disaster?</strong></h2> <p><strong>Pollack</strong>: <a href="https://twitter.com/RealJamesWoods" target="_blank">James Woods</a>, the actor, went absolutely nuts about me. Then a bunch of people joined in because he’s got a lot of followers. I said something favorable about a speech by Al Sharpton. He hates Al Sharpton. It was bizarre.</p> <p><strong>Scalzi</strong>: I used to be the editor of the <em><a href="http://chicagomaroon.com" target="_blank">Maroon</a></em>, so people have been sending me hate mail for 25 years. I used to get hate mail on paper, old school, when there was more craft to it. I have no problem muting people. They don’t even know. They can go off as much as they want, but they’re talking to a wall.</p> <p><strong>Mason</strong>: One day in spring Randy Schekman, the editor in chief of <em><a href="http://elifesciences.org" target="_blank">eLIFE</a></em>, wrote an editorial that he’d thought about it again, and if his postdocs don’t want to publish in <em><a href="http://www.cell.com" target="_blank">Cell</a></em>, <em><a href="http://www.nature.com/nature/index.html" target="_blank">Nature</a></em>, or <em><a href="http://www.sciencemag.org/journals" target="_blank">Science</a></em>—they’re known as CNS—he doesn’t want them in his lab. Randy had started <em>eLIFE</em> in direct opposition to this idea of CNS supremacy. I tweeted this scathing response. What was the date? April 1. I totally missed that.</p> <h2><strong>How does it compare with other social networking sites?</strong></h2> <p><strong>Mason</strong>: My impression is that it’s passé for the undergrads. They’re on to something else. But this is it for me. This is as far as I go. <strong>Pollack</strong>: The difference between Facebook and Twitter is that on Facebook, you get into conflicts with people you know. On Twitter, you get into conflicts with people you don’t know.</p> <h2><strong>Any advice for people new to Twitter?</strong></h2> <p><strong>Mason: </strong>I have no idea what other people should do. A friend of mine who tweets a lot has three or four different Twitter accounts. He tweets science here, politics here, music here. He suggested that to me. OK, no.</p> <p><strong>Thaler</strong>: Spend some time just reading. Find out what you like and don’t like. Then you can start tweeting in an informed way.</p> <p><strong>Shubin</strong>: Stay positive. Don’t try to go viral. Don’t get in arguments.</p> <p><strong>Pollack</strong>: Wait until you have some stuff to say and a reason to say it. Twitter can be very addictive. You can waste a lot of time. Wait until after your first 10 papers are published.</p> <p><strong>Scalzi</strong>: Everything you tweet is in the public forever. Tweets are being archived by the <a href="https://www.loc.gov" target="_blank">Library of Congress</a> now. To use a high school expression, it’s going down on your permanent record. Just because it’s 140 characters long doesn’t mean it can’t absolutely ruin your life.</p> <h2><strong>I have a dream of getting <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/oldchurchslavonic?src=hash" target="_blank">#OldChurchSlavonic</a> to go viral. Do you think there’s any hope? </strong></h2> <p><strong>Thaler</strong>: No way.</p> <p><strong>Scalzi</strong>: Old Church Lavonic? Oh, Old Church <em>Slavonic</em>. No. The definition of viral is that transmission is easy, fun, something that people do without even a second thought. So the odds are really against it. And eventually someone’s going to send you the picture of <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pubd-spHN-0" target="_blank">Regina from <em>Mean Girls</em></a>: “Stop trying to make #OldChurchSlavonic happen! It’s not going to happen!”</p> <p><strong>Mason</strong>: What the hell is that? Well, maybe. You could get me, Randy Picker [AB’80, AM’82, JD’85; <a href="http://www.twitter.com/randypicker" target="_blank">@randypicker</a>; James Parker Hall Distinguished Service Professor of <a href="http://www.law.uchicago.edu" target="_blank">Law</a>). Try the <a href="https://humanities.uchicago.edu" target="_blank">Humanities Division</a>. Let’s see whether we can do it.</p> <p><strong>Shubin</strong>: Ask <a href="http://www.twitter.com/TheEllenShow" target="_blank">Ellen DeGeneres</a> to tweet a selfie with it.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/university-news" hreflang="en">University News</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/social-media" hreflang="en">Social Media</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refformats field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/formats/interview" hreflang="en">Interview</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-relatedstories field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>“<a href="http://mag.uchicago.edu/science-medicine/open-review" target="_blank">Open Review</a>” (<em>University of Chicago Magazine</em>, July–Aug/15)</p> <p>“<a href="http://campaign.uchicago.edu/feature/back-and-to-the-future/" target="_blank">Back, and to the Future</a>” (University of Chicago Campaign: Inquiry and Impact website)</p> <p>“<a href="http://magazine.uchicago.edu/0910/features/tweet_people.shtml" target="_blank">It’s How You Tweet People</a>” (<em>University of Chicago Magazine</em>, Sept–Oct/09)</p> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/power-tweeters" data-a2a-title="Power tweeters"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Funiversity-news%2Fpower-tweeters&amp;title=Power%20tweeters"></a></span> Wed, 07 Oct 2015 20:57:54 +0000 jmiller 5031 at https://mag.uchicago.edu Open review https://mag.uchicago.edu/science-medicine/open-review <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/1508_Demanski_Open-review.jpg" width="1600" height="743" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/jmiller" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">jmiller</span></span> <span>Thu, 07/16/2015 - 13:19</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>(Photography by Matthew Gilson)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/kevin-jiang"> <a href="/author/kevin-jiang"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Kevin Jiang</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/university-chicago-magazine" hreflang="en">The University of Chicago Magazine</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item">July–Aug/15</div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>When geneticist Yoav Gilad and a colleague detected errors in an influential study, Gilad took to Twitter with their finding.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Last December a study in the <em><a href="http://www.pnas.org" target="_blank">Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences</a></em> presented evidence for an extraordinary finding—that human and mouse tissues were genetically more different than previously thought. The authors, members of the <a href="http://www.mouseencode.org" target="_blank">Mouse ENCODE Consortium</a>, concluded that gene expression in a mouse heart, for example, is more similar to a mouse kidney than to a human heart. Since mice are a near-ubiquitous tool in human genetics research, the result was field shaking. It also left many scientists puzzled.</p> <p><a href="http://genes.uchicago.edu/contents/faculty/gilad-yoav.html" target="_blank">Yoav Gilad</a>, UChicago professor of <a href="http://genes.uchicago.edu" target="_blank">human genetics</a>, was one such puzzled scientist. Together with postdoctoral researcher Orna Mizrahi-Man, Gilad spent three months reanalyzing raw data from the original study. According to their analysis, the ENCODE authors did not account for “batch effects”—errors that arise from the way different batches of samples are processed during experiments. When Gilad and Mizrahi-Man removed these batch effects, the conclusion of the study reversed.</p> <p>Instead of a traditional route to disseminate these critiques, <a href="https://twitter.com/y_gilad" target="_blank">Gilad tweeted</a> the main figures from the reanalysis in April. It caused a sensation. A few weeks later in May, he and Mizrahi-Man published their full results online in the open science publication platform <em><a href="http://f1000research.com" target="_blank">F1000Research</a></em>. The debate was recapped in <em><a href="http://www.nature.com/news/potential-flaws-in-genomics-paper-scrutinized-on-twitter-1.17591" target="_blank">Nature</a></em> and the <em><a href="http://www.the-scientist.com/?articles.view/articleNo/43057/title/Week-in-Review--May-18-22/" target="_blank">Scientist</a></em> and continues in full public view.</p> <p>However, another debate has emerged. Is Twitter the right forum for scientific critique? In an <a href="http://sciencelife.uchospitals.edu/2015/06/10/breaking-social-norms-a-qa-with-yoav-gilad/" target="_blank">interview</a> condensed and adapted here, the <a href="http://www.uchospitals.edu/index.shtml" target="_blank">Medicine</a> and <a href="http://www.bsd.uchicago.edu" target="_blank">Biological Sciences</a>’ <a href="http://sciencelife.uchospitals.edu" target="_blank"><em>ScienceLife</em> blog</a> spoke with Gilad about his decision to take science to social media.—<em>Kevin Jiang</em></p> <hr /><h2><strong>Why did you decide to put your results on Twitter?</strong></h2> <p>The decision to go on Twitter was actually pretty impulsive. I’ve been involved in efforts to offer criticism or correction for papers through the typical channels—communicating with the original author, submitting the manuscript for review by the same journal, and submitting it to another journal if rejected. This process is very, very long, and in most cases the criticisms are either ignored or don’t receive nearly as much attention as the original report. What happens is people just go and read the paper, think about it, and then there’s usually not a lot of conversation after that. Often, years later, you find the original report still resonates more with people than the correction or criticism.</p> <p>Orna and I were still working on the paper, and we had this result. I put out the main figures with a very neutral statement. The figures spoke for themselves.</p> <h2><strong>What was the response like?</strong></h2> <p>More than 30,000 people viewed the initial tweet. The vast majority were scientists, including students, postdocs, and faculty all over the world. Immediately people asked for more details. They tried to understand what we did and how, and started discussing the merit of our headline result. I answered that there’s a preprint on the way and that it’s probably more useful to wait for that because it’s hard to communicate more than headlines over Twitter.</p> <p>In the meantime, it was widely shared, probably because the figures were pretty self-explanatory. And also partially because there’s a measure of trust. If you tweet the headline, you believe in your result.</p> <h2><strong>Were you happy with how your Tweets were received?</strong></h2> <p>I think that this was an example of the great advantage of social media. It just immediately took off. When the paper was put online, it was viewed nearly 10,000 times in one week. That’s a number that you get in a couple of months, for my papers at least. Somebody described it as the carriage ahead of the horses. It’s kind of true. But if we did it the other way around, I don’t think it would have received the same response.</p> <h2><strong>Were there criticisms to your approach?</strong></h2> <p>There weren’t when we first tweeted the figures. When the paper came out and people could see more of the details, we retweeted again. The principal investigator on the <em>Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences </em>paper made a comment about breaking social norms, but I have not seen anything else.</p> <h2><strong>Do you think about possible reprisal?</strong></h2> <p>No, and I don’t even understand why this question comes up. We are scientists and anything that gets us faster to the truth should be encouraged. Nobody doctored their data, nobody did anything misleading on purpose, nobody did anything that we’d consider unacceptable in science.</p> <p>I certainly don’t expect all my papers are right, and I don’t expect in the future that when someone finds a mistake in my papers they’ll be afraid to put it forward. If you have 100 papers and no corrections, you’re not a scientist. Because either you don’t care to correct, or you don’t believe you’ve ever made a mistake.</p> <p>To read more, visit <a href="http://sciencelife.uchospitals.edu/2015/06/10/breaking-social-norms-a-qa-with-yoav-gilad/" target="_blank">sciencelife.uchospitals.edu/2015/06/10/breaking-social-norms-a-qa-with-yoav-gilad</a></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/science-medicine" hreflang="en">Science &amp; Medicine</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/genetics" hreflang="en">Genetics</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/social-media" hreflang="en">Social Media</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refformats field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/formats/interview" hreflang="en">Interview</a></div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/science-medicine/open-review" data-a2a-title="Open review"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Fscience-medicine%2Fopen-review&amp;title=Open%20review"></a></span> Thu, 16 Jul 2015 18:19:32 +0000 jmiller 4859 at https://mag.uchicago.edu You won’t believe what the editors of BuzzFeed, Gawker, and VICE said at the Institute of Politics https://mag.uchicago.edu/law-policy-society/you-wont-believe-what-editors-buzzfeed-gawker-and-vice-said-institute-politics <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/1503_Golus_New-news.png" width="1600" height="743" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/jmiller" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">jmiller</span></span> <span>Fri, 03/20/2015 - 10:19</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item">Three smartphones display the home pages for <em>BuzzFeed</em>, <em>Gawker</em>, and <em>VICE</em>. (Photography by Joy Olivia Miller)</div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/carrie-golus-ab91-am93"> <a href="/author/carrie-golus-ab91-am93"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Carrie Golus, AB’91, AM’93</div> </a> </div> </div> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/joy-olivia-miller"> <a href="/author/joy-olivia-miller"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Joy Olivia Miller</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/web-exclusives" hreflang="en">Web exclusives</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item"><p>03.20.2015</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item">Seven things about the “new news” you need to know NOW.</div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item">Last month the <a href="http://politics.uchicago.edu" target="_blank">Institute of Politics</a> hosted a panel discussion, “<a href="http://politics.uchicago.edu/news/entry/top-15-reasons-attend-new-news" target="_blank">The New News</a>,” featuring Rocco Castoro, editor in chief of <a href="http://www.vice.com" target="_blank"><em>VICE</em></a>; Max Read, editor in chief of <a href="http://www.gawker.com" target="_blank"><em>Gawker</em></a>; and Shani Hilton, executive editor of news for <a href="http://www.buzzfeed.com" target="_blank"><em>BuzzFeed</em></a>. The big question of the evening: what is the future of news? The first bombshell came from Castoro: “As of last night I’m no longer with <em>VICE</em>,” he told the audience. “In order to be here and talk to you guys, some stuff happened, let’s say.” (Maddeningly, <em>VICE</em> never supplied <a href="http://www.politico.com/blogs/media/2015/02/vice-names-new-eic-head-of-content-202484.html" target="_blank">further details</a> in the days afterward, and—despite a long history of <a href="http://gawker.com/what-is-vice-medias-average-salary-1652838920" target="_blank">digging up dirt on <em>VICE</em></a>—neither did <em>Gawker</em>.) The discussion was moderated by Tom Rosenstiel, executive director of the <a href="http://www.americanpressinstitute.org" target="_blank">American Press Institute</a>. <h2>1. <em>BuzzFeed</em> has an ethics policy. <em>Gawker</em> does not.</h2> <strong>Rosenstiel:</strong> “Max [Read], I’ll send you a copy of <em>The Elements of Journalism</em>, one of the books I’ve written, so you can start an ethics code.” <img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/1503_Golus_07c_new-news.gif" align="middle" width="215" />   <img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/1503_Golus_07_new-news.gif" align="middle" width="215" /><h2>2. <em>Gawker</em>’s favorite metric has nothing to do with page views.</h2> <strong>Read:</strong> “Generally—this is an incredibly corny thing to say—the best metric is getting a couple of emails from people who really like what we do, especially if it’s on pieces that we’re getting a lot of flak for.” <strong>Rosenstiel:</strong> “That’s remarkable. That’s the kind of thing you might have heard an editor say 30 years ago.” <img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/1503_Golus_05c_new-news.gif" align="middle" width="215" />   <img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/1503_Golus_05_new-news.gif" align="middle" width="215" /><h2>3. <em>VICE</em> sometimes uses click bait to get readers to look at more serious content.</h2> <strong>Castoro:</strong> “You do want to bait them in with the honey and give them a little bit of the saltwater when they come in. That’s really the way the world is. It’s not just cats.” <strong>Rosenstiel:</strong> “Well, Joseph Pulitzer invented the comic strip at the end of the 19th century, so you’re not entirely new there.” <img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/1503_Golus_06k_new-news.gif" align="middle" width="215" />   <img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/1503_Golus_06i_new-news.gif" align="middle" width="215" /><h2>4. All of these editors consider themselves to be in the journalism business.</h2> <strong>Read:</strong> “<em>Gawker</em>’s founder Nick Denton used to say, we’re not journalists, but we might do journalism accidentally.” <strong>Rosenstiel:</strong> “We’re going to go in the green room later and talk about stuff that we couldn’t talk about up here, and then Max [Read] can put it on <em>Gawker</em>.” <img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/1503_Golus_08b_new-news.gif" align="middle" width="215" />   <img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/1503_Golus_08c_new-news.gif" align="middle" width="215" /><h2>5. Traffic to these sites comes primarily from other places: Facebook, “dark social” (email or IM), Twitter, or Pinterest.</h2> <strong>Castoro:</strong> I think it basically follows that model, minus the Pinterest. <strong>Hilton:</strong> You gotta get a “Pintern.” <img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/1503_Golus_10_new-news.gif" align="middle" width="215" />   <img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/1503_Golus_10d_new-news.gif" align="middle" width="215" /><h2>6. Asked what they would like to cover more, Read (<em>Gawker</em>) chose Internet culture, Hilton (<em>BuzzFeed</em>) said climate change, and Castoro (formerly <em>VICE</em>) said international topics.</h2> <strong>Castoro:</strong> “We did an issue called “Saving South Sudan.” It was one author, one photographer, and a 30,000-word story. I would love to bring attention to issues like that.” <img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/1503_Golus_11c_new-news.gif" align="middle" width="215" /><h2>7. Middle-aged people don’t enjoy <em>Gawker</em>, as Read’s parents like to point out. But the real issue is the young people of tomorrow.</h2> <strong>Read:</strong> “We’re not Instagram or Snapchat. That’s a bigger business problem.” <img src="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/1503_Golus_12c_new-news.gif" align="middle" width="215" /></div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/law-policy-society" hreflang="en">Law, Policy &amp; Society</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/journalism" hreflang="en">Journalism</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/social-media" hreflang="en">Social Media</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refuchicago field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/institute-politics" hreflang="en">Institute of Politics</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refformats field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/formats/list" hreflang="en">List</a></div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/law-policy-society/you-wont-believe-what-editors-buzzfeed-gawker-and-vice-said-institute-politics" data-a2a-title="You won’t believe what the editors of BuzzFeed, Gawker, and VICE said at the Institute of Politics"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Flaw-policy-society%2Fyou-wont-believe-what-editors-buzzfeed-gawker-and-vice-said-institute-politics&amp;title=You%20won%E2%80%99t%20believe%20what%20the%20editors%20of%20BuzzFeed%2C%20Gawker%2C%20and%20VICE%20said%20at%20the%20Institute%20of%20Politics"></a></span> Fri, 20 Mar 2015 15:19:47 +0000 jmiller 4523 at https://mag.uchicago.edu Twitterocracy https://mag.uchicago.edu/law-policy-society/twitterocracy <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/1411_Zulkey_Twitterocracy.png" width="700" height="325" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/jmiller" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">jmiller</span></span> <span>Tue, 11/04/2014 - 15:20</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item">Activist Andrew Slack speaks to the crowd at the ALA President's Program in January about his work with the Harry Potter Alliance. (<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/ala_members/12180191206/in/photolist-dC4YPT-dCapK1-dCapz5-dCapFf-dC4ZfK-56nHnG-jyiVo9-jyjEuE-jygxzx-jyiChy-jyjFGj-5C8E8R" target="_blank">Photography</a> courtesy the ALA, CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)</div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/claire-zulkey"> <a href="/author/claire-zulkey"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Claire Zulkey</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/web-exclusives" hreflang="en">Web exclusives</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item"><p>11.04.2014</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item">Cathy Cohen examines the ever-shifting political landscape.</div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item">In her talk “Remaking Democracy in the 21st Century: New Media Participatory Politics and Race,” <a href="http://political-science.uchicago.edu/people/faculty/cohen.shtml" target="_blank">Cathy Cohen</a>, the David and Mary Winton Green Professor of Political Science, set out to explore a timely topic: whether “participatory politics” might alter some of the conventions of American politics. In addition to the mid-October presentation to the <a href="http://womensboard.uchicago.edu" target="_blank">Women’s Board</a> at the University Club that I attended,<a href="http://chicagohumanities.org/events/2014/journeys/cathy-cohen" target="_blank"> Cohen spoke on the same topic</a> at the <a href="http://chicagohumanities.org" target="_blank">Chicago Humanities Festival</a>. She focused on the ways people engage in politics through new and digital media (referred to as participatory politics), the standards of digital equality, and how participatory politics serves as a tool particularly for young people of color. Technology and politics go hand-in-hand, from Franklin D. Roosevelt’s fireside chats to the first televised political debates. Does the ascendant role of new media, such as the use of Twitter during political uprisings, signal a new transformation in American politics? Already anyone with digital skills can bypass the editors and publishers who used to be gatekeepers and share news and opinions beyond their neighborhoods and friends. Cohen cited the nonprofit fan activist group <a href="http://thehpalliance.org" target="_blank">Harry Potter Alliance</a> as practicing participatory politics through social media: in response to the 2010 earthquakes in Haiti, the group used Twitter to promote fundraising for relief and ultimately sent five cargo planes of supplies to the country. However Cohen was cautious not to overstate the positive effects of participatory politics. “It’s not clear if participatory politics will lead to sustained mobilization,” she said, referring to the Occupy Movement, where many individuals participated but few maintained deep ties. Cohen found that inequalities exist even just in terms of internet access. She showed research demonstrating that on average, white youth have better broadband access and knowledge about the internet than their black and Hispanic counterparts, and that black youth are more likely to engage in friendship-driven activities online versus the interest-driven activities that attract more white and Asian youth. Does that mean that ultimately, those who could be most empowered by the internet are not taking advantage of the opportunity? Moreover, many black youth still see themselves as politically alienated, despite the fact that this generation, Cohen noted, is presented with the greatest opportunity for advancement of any generation of black Americans, with black officials in power and no harsh realities of Jim Crow laws. Cohen showed disturbing video clips showing black youth being harassed or abused by police officers, including the protests in Ferguson, Missouri. She noted that while the ability to raise awareness of these events online is a method of participatory politics, it can also reinforce feelings of powerlessness and disenfranchisement among viewers. Cohen wrapped up by pointing out some ways that a new digital public sphere can still be improved to foster new types of political equality. For instance, many public and charter schools shut down access to the web during the school day to keep students focused on their classes, one consequence is that it blocks their ability to engage in participatory politics. Ultimately, Cohen said, participatory politics provides an opportunity for a new infrastructure where young people can create a public space where political equality is exercised. “True embrace of participatory politics means rethinking what counts as equality.”</div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/law-policy-society" hreflang="en">Law, Policy &amp; Society</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/political-science" hreflang="en">Political Science</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/politics" hreflang="en">Politics</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/social-media" hreflang="en">Social Media</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-storymedia field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><h2 class="media-icon media-icon-video">Video</h2> <iframe width="200" height="113" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/CRrsaEbh72s" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><p>Professor Cathy Cohen discusses the <a href="http://www.blackyouthproject.com" target="_blank">Black Youth Project</a>, what it reveals about black Americans’ experience, and the political repercussions of these findings as part of the 25th Chicago Humanities Festival.</p> <p> <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CRrsaEbh72s" class="more-link" target="_blank">WATCH THE VIDEO AT YOUTUBE</a></p> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/law-policy-society/twitterocracy" data-a2a-title="Twitterocracy"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Flaw-policy-society%2Ftwitterocracy&amp;title=Twitterocracy"></a></span> Tue, 04 Nov 2014 21:20:24 +0000 jmiller 4064 at https://mag.uchicago.edu #uchicagoselfie https://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/uchicagoselfie <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/1404_Demanski_UChicagoSelfie.png" width="700" height="325" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/rsmith" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">rsmith</span></span> <span>Tue, 03/04/2014 - 16:28</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>(Photos via instagram.com/uchicagomag)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/laura-demanski-am94"> <a href="/author/laura-demanski-am94"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Laura Demanski, AM’94</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/university-chicago-magazine" hreflang="en">The University of Chicago Magazine</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item">Mar–Apr/14</div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Face time at the <em>Magazine</em>’s Instagram account.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>When Oxford Dictionaries <a href="http://blog.oxforddictionaries.com/press-releases/oxford-dictionaries-word-of-the-year-2013/" target="_blank">declared</a> “selfie” its 2013 Word of the Year, the company credited a 17,000 percent increase in the word’s usage over the previous 12 months. A quick search for the word in the <em>Magazine</em>’s online archives, however, yields zero results. To kick off our new Instagram account, we’re jumping in with both feet. We hope you’ll add yours to these self-made faces of UChicago.</p> <p>Join our selfie party. Snap a photograph of yourself and share it on Instagram using <a href="http://statigr.am/tag/uchicagoselfie" target="_blank">#uchicagoselfie</a>. Don’t have an account? We have you covered. E-mail your photo to <a href="mailto:uchicago-magazine@uchicago.edu">uchicago-magazine@uchicago.edu</a>, and we’ll post it. To follow along, go to <a href="http://instagram.com/uchicagomag" target="_blank">instagram.com/uchicagomag</a>.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/university-news" hreflang="en">University News</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/social-media" hreflang="en">Social Media</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/photography" hreflang="en">Photography</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refformats field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/formats/lite-mind" hreflang="en">Lite of the Mind</a></div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/uchicagoselfie" data-a2a-title="#uchicagoselfie"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Funiversity-news%2Fuchicagoselfie&amp;title=%23uchicagoselfie"></a></span> Tue, 04 Mar 2014 22:28:47 +0000 rsmith 2930 at https://mag.uchicago.edu Antisocial media https://mag.uchicago.edu/law-policy-society/antisocial-media <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/1402_Tsang_Antisocial-media_0.png" width="700" height="325" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/jmiller" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">jmiller</span></span> <span>Mon, 12/23/2013 - 10:49</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>(<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/48112820@N05/6784102187/in/photolist-bkuie6-7sDr81-fo8C7r-ewsF7v-7RBJx3-8JE61G-7SvJQj-8dEdj3-6CEkeZ-7SsMY2-7SsMXX-7SsMXZ-7RTCY3-7SsMXR-8cCr6d-7SvJQo-7YJNN3-7SsMXM-7Yw9SL-7Ywri5-7Yw9SQ-7YwrhW-7Yw9SJ-7Ywri1-7Yw9SG-7Yw9SN-7YJNNo-7Yw9SS-74AAL5-dtqTW4-2NDJDd" target="_blank">Photo collage</a> by kid-josh, CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/derek-tsang-ab15"> <a href="/author/derek-tsang-ab15"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Derek Tsang, AB’15</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/university-chicago-magazine" hreflang="en">The University of Chicago Magazine</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item">Jan–Feb/14</div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Nearly half of young people report experiencing online abuse—and they're changing the way they respond.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>In response to widening concern about cyberbullying and other forms of digital abuse—and aiming to contribute solid data to recent public and private initiatives to combat that abuse—the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Research conducted a survey of young people this past fall. Working with MTV (whose anticyberbullying campaign is called A Thin Line), AP-NORC researchers found that nearly half of 14- to 24-year-olds say they’ve been harassed electronically. That number is down, from 56 percent in 2011 to 49 percent in 2013.</p> <p>Defining digital abuse as everything from looking at text messages without permission to online gossiping and impersonation, the researchers also noted that young people are changing the way they respond: more are telling parents or siblings or calling help lines when they are harassed, and a significantly higher percentage report that taking those steps made the situation better. Only 29 percent of those who retaliated against their harasser reported that it improved the situation, down from 47 percent in 2011.</p> <p><a name="infographic" id="infographic"></a></p> <h3>Percentage of 14–17-year-olds likely to intervene</h3> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/law-policy-society" hreflang="en">Law, Policy &amp; Society</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/social-media" hreflang="en">Social Media</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refformats field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/formats/fig-1" hreflang="en">Fig. 1</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-storymedia field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><h2 class="media-icon media-icon-infographic">Infographic</h2> <p><img src="http://magazine.uchicago.edu/1402/1402_Tsang_Antisocial-media_spotB.png" width="200"></p> <p>Percentage of 14–17-year-olds likely to intervene</p> <p><a href="#infographic" class="more-link">VIEW LARGER INFOGRAPHIC</a> </p> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/law-policy-society/antisocial-media" data-a2a-title="Antisocial media"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Flaw-policy-society%2Fantisocial-media&amp;title=Antisocial%20media"></a></span> Mon, 23 Dec 2013 16:49:15 +0000 jmiller 2673 at https://mag.uchicago.edu Words of advice for young people https://mag.uchicago.edu/words-advice-young-people <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/1304_Golus_Edythe.jpg" width="700" height="325" alt="(Photos courtesy Edythe Kirchmaier)" title="(Photos courtesy Edythe Kirchmaier)" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/jmiller" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">jmiller</span></span> <span>Fri, 04/05/2013 - 14:55</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item">(Photos courtesy Edythe Kirchmaier)</div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/carrie-golus-ab91-am93"> <a href="/author/carrie-golus-ab91-am93"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Carrie Golus, AB’91, AM’93</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/web-exclusives" hreflang="en">Web exclusives</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item"><p>04.05.2013</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item">Facebook’s oldest user, Edythe Kirchmaier, 105, has some suggestions for you.</div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item">At 105, Edythe Kirchmaier, X’34, is <a href="https://ssa.uchicago.edu/105-years-service" target="_blank">SSA’s oldest known former student</a>, California’s oldest licensed driver, and—as of January—the oldest user of Facebook. Her page asks other Facebook users to grant her birthday wish: 105,000 likes for her favorite charity, Direct Relief, where she has volunteered for nearly 40 years. Since the news about Facebook’s oldest user got out, Kirchmaier has been featured on <a href="http://watch.accesshollywood.com/video/edythe-kirchmaier-talks-charity-work-turning-105-years-old/2096300369001" target="_blank"><em>Access Hollywood</em></a>, <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pFu8JIasS98" target="_blank"><em>Ellen</em></a>, and <a href="http://www.nbc.com/the-tonight-show/video/105-year-old-edythe-kirchmaier-part-2/n33039/" target="_blank"><em>The Tonight Show with Jay Leno</em></a>. By Friday, <a href="https://www.facebook.com/directrelief" target="_blank">Direct Relief</a> had received 123,024 likes. <hr /><h3>Had you ever tried Facebook before?</h3> No. I didn’t even know what Facebook was. Direct Relief set me up. They had a hard time, because I’m too old. They had to contact Facebook, and they worked around their little gadgets and got me on. I just checked my e-mail this morning, and I have 81,111 people signed up on my Facebook. And from all over the world—Rwanda, Mozambique, every place. I have more fun, turning it on and checking the people and what they have to say.  <img src="http://magazine.uchicago.edu/1304/1304_Golus_Edythe_spotB.jpg" alt="" align="right" /><h3>And you still volunteer at Direct Relief every Tuesday?</h3> Yes. I write thank-you notes mostly. <h3>I’ve heard you have the best handwriting of anyone there.</h3> I guess it’s because I’m older than the others. I learned to write differently when I was in school. <h3>You’ve seen so much of life. Do you have any advice for the rest of us?</h3> My advice is to live well, be positive in your thinking, don’t worry about things that you can’t change, and just be happy. Be friendly. Love people. I think love is about the greatest word in our dictionary. I think if people loved more, we’d be a much better world. <h3>Do you have any suggestions for staying healthy?</h3> Diet and exercise are important. I’m a little wobbly, so I’m in a class where we all do chair exercises. It’s safer. I don’t eat any fats. I don’t eat ham or Canadian bacon. I eat well—three good meals a day. When I had to go on a diabetic diet, I dropped from 123 pounds to 115. So now I’m around 114 or 115. I’m 5’1”, so that’s a good weight. <h3>Do you let yourself have any treats?</h3> I can eat ice cream, just not as a regular diet. Once in a while I have a piece of cake. [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_original","fid":"648","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"550","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"460"}}]] <h3>You were married to your husband Joe Kirchmaier, AM’37, for nearly 70 years. How do you keep a marriage going for so long?</h3> My husband and I knew each other for just three months when we were married. I always have to add this, because people get kind of shocked. We worked in the same office, and I was his supervisor. So we had a lot of contact. We got to the point where we started eating lunch together, usually with some other people from our group, then we started going out on dates. At the end of three months, he decided he wanted to leave Chicago—1938 was one of the worst winters that Chicago has experienced. His proposal was, “I’m going to California. Would you like to come with me?” And I said, “I sure would.” We got married and left that same day. We went to California and we never looked back. We had a lot of interests in common. We both loved social work. We just got along beautifully. We had arguments, but we never went to bed on an argument. We respected each other. I think that’s very important in a marriage.</div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/education-social-service" hreflang="en">Education &amp; Social Service</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/social-media" hreflang="en">Social Media</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refuchicago field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/chicago-harris" hreflang="en">Harris Public Policy</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refformats field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/formats/interview" hreflang="en">Interview</a></div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/words-advice-young-people" data-a2a-title=" Words of advice for young people"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Fwords-advice-young-people&amp;title=%20Words%20of%20advice%20for%20young%20people"></a></span> Fri, 05 Apr 2013 19:55:57 +0000 jmiller 1948 at https://mag.uchicago.edu