Law Enforcement https://mag.uchicago.edu/tags/law-enforcement en The meditative judge https://mag.uchicago.edu/law-policy-society/meditative-judge <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/story/images/18Spring_Spillane_The_Meditative_Judge.jpg" width="2000" height="1000" alt="The meditative judg" title="The meditative judg" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/admin" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">admin</span></span> <span>Thu, 05/03/2018 - 16:44</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>(© Jon Krause c/o theispot)</p></div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/edward-spillane-jd92"> <a href="/author/edward-spillane-jd92"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Edward Spillane, JD’92</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/university-chicago-magazine" hreflang="en">The University of Chicago Magazine</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item">Spring/18</div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Yoga and meditation lend a new perspective to a judge's work.</p></div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>In the meditation and yoga classes I’ve taken for the past several years, I’ve learned that mindfulness—an acute awareness of what is happening in the present moment—can improve my life. In yoga mindfulness allows one to unite the body and the mind in the present through a variety of physical poses. But as a municipal court judge in College Station, Texas, I have also seen it work wonders in my courtroom. In retrospect, I was using mindfulness long before I recognized what it was.</p> <p>I met my first “client” while in law school. At the University of Chicago Law School’s Mandel Legal Aid Clinic in the early 1990s, we were helping citizens avoid losing their housing due to evictions that violated federal civil rights law. I do not remember her name. But I can remember as clearly as if it were yesterday the experience of seeing the law I had studied in class come to life in the basement legal aid clinic. I can still remember the dress and sweater she wore for the interview at the clinic and her children, who accompanied her. She told me her story, her struggles, her work history, and we eventually were able to save her housing by sending a letter to the landlord explaining the situation and the lawsuit we might file should she be evicted.</p> <p>It wasn’t until many years later that I understood why I still have a clear image of meeting this woman. Even though our discussions were brief and her name is lost to me, I was completely and utterly mindful of that person at that time. Her situation and her struggles were more important in the moment than any other thoughts, concerns, or appointments I had at the time. My focus was on her.</p> <p>Today I have been a judge in College Station for a little over 15 years. Before that I was a felony prosecutor. In the past five years, just as I began to cultivate mindfulness through meditation and yoga, I have been focused on misdemeanors, an area in need of reform. Too many misdemeanor defendants in jail are there not because they are a risk to the public or refuse to come back to court, but because of their economic circumstances. They either cannot make the bail assessed against them or cannot pay the fines, fees, and other charges that stack up in many cases.</p> <p>Working on reform takes a global view and requires insights beyond an individual defendant; however, I have learned that individuals tell the story better than statistics. Mindfully focusing on the person in the courtroom allows a judge to gain insights that can then go beyond that one person.</p> <p>Misdemeanors include disorderly conduct, public intoxication, traffic offenses, theft, and driving with an invalid driver’s license. The last offense is particularly omnipresent as more states suspend people’s licenses for unpaid fees and fines, feeding a cycle that prevents many defendants from closing their cases. Without a license they can’t drive to work, and without working they can’t pay down what they owe. With court costs, fees, driver’s license suspension surcharges, and failure to appear charges, a $200 case can easily become $2,000. And that might as well be $2 million to an indigent defendant.</p> <p>Richard G. was such a defendant. A year ago he received two violations: speeding and no insurance. I first saw Richard in the jail when he was arrested for failing to appear. When I see defendants in the jail, I always let them out without making them post a bond. I have found if they have a chance to talk to a judge who listens to them and explains the options (including pleading not guilty), they tend to show up to court and cooperate.</p> <p>I asked Richard, “Why didn’t you come to court?” He told me that he was saving money for the fines and court costs but also that he was afraid of being arrested there. I let him know that our standard practice is never to arrest defendants in our courthouse even if they have active arrest warrants for not appearing or unpaid fines.</p> <p>Richard was a hard worker. He held two jobs yet was having trouble making ends meet with a child whose special needs incurred hefty medical bills. He could not afford insurance and was on his way to losing his driver’s license. The $200 traffic ticket would in many courts be the beginning of an impossible financial burden. The bottom line was that Richard could not hold his two jobs without driving a car. As a judge, I needed to be mindful of Richard’s individual case.</p> <p>I told Richard that as long as he came to court he would never be arrested. Even if he could not follow my order, we would listen to and work with him as long as he kept in contact. Richard assured me that he would get insurance. He paid what he could of the speeding fine and performed community service on a Saturday morning. After one month of his cooperating with the court and after he showed proof of insurance, I waived the rest of the fines and fees Richard owed. Cooperation is a two-way street, and I made sure he had a chance to be a law abiding citizen, one who knows now not to be afraid of courts or judges.</p> <p>Richard G. is one man with one case in one court in Texas. But, like the lady in the Mandel Clinic, one person can represent so much more. How can we put mindfulness in practice throughout the justice system with the positive results I’ve seen in one courtroom? Improvements in the law itself will go a long way quickly, along with training and persuading stakeholders across the criminal justice system.</p> <p>In Texas, far from a liberal state and with a legislature perhaps more conservative than its citizens, laws granting judges the ability to waive fines, court costs, and fees in cases where alternative punishments are an undue burden have given us a way to release defendants from impossible financial obstacles. We also have incorporated a long list of alternative sentencing options that work: teen court, where teens make decisions about how much community service their peers should perform; drug rehabilitation programs; high school degree training; first offender, victim impact, or community living classes; and mentoring or tutoring.</p> <p>In my experience these programs, when properly funded and run, are more effective than jail or fines for most misdemeanors and nonviolent felonies. Our judicial council and chief justice of the Texas Supreme Court Nathan Hecht, working with our state legislature, even managed to get a safe harbor law passed in 2017: now no defendants can be arrested if they come to court, even if they have active warrants outstanding for failing to appear or unpaid fines. What I once discussed with Richard G. is now Texas law.</p> <p>Most judges’ chief desire is for defendants to avoid future visits to any courtroom, and alternative punishments that rely less on fines and bail have produced positive results.</p> <p>A mindful focus on individual defendants in the courtroom can allow judges to contribute to large-scale reform. Applying punishments mechanically actually creates criminal justice failures. A focus on the present allows a judge to gain more insight into each defendant and serve the best interests of everyone in his or her court. What I experienced as a law student at the Mandel Legal Clinic now makes sense to me so many years later. Mindfulness works.</p> <hr /><p><em>Judge Edward Spillane, JD’92, is a member of the National Task Force on Fines, Fees, and Bail Practices and of the Misdemeanor Criminal Justice Project of John Jay College of Criminal Justice.</em></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/law-policy-society" hreflang="en">Law, Policy &amp; Society</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/law-enforcement" hreflang="en">Law Enforcement</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/prison" hreflang="en">Prison</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refformats field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/formats/alumni-essay" hreflang="en">Alumni Essay</a></div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/law-policy-society/meditative-judge" data-a2a-title="The meditative judge"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Flaw-policy-society%2Fmeditative-judge&amp;title=The%20meditative%20judge"></a></span> Thu, 03 May 2018 21:44:49 +0000 admin 6897 at https://mag.uchicago.edu Legal advice https://mag.uchicago.edu/law-policy-society/legal-advice <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/1608_Golus_Legal-advice.jpg" width="1600" height="743" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Anonymous</span></span> <span>Wed, 07/27/2016 - 13:57</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>McCoy started working at her dad’s law firm at 14. Now she’s a partner. (Photography by Michigan Media)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/carrie-golus-ab91-am93"> <a href="/author/carrie-golus-ab91-am93"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Carrie Golus, AB’91, AM’93</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/university-chicago-magazine" hreflang="en">The University of Chicago Magazine</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item">Summer/16</div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Attorney Robyn McCoy, AB’96, teaches what to do during a police stop.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>The Trayvon Martin case was the catalyst. “I was so anguished about it,” says <a href="http://www.citizenlawclinic.org/robyn_mccoy" target="_blank">Robyn McCoy</a>, AB’96. “I’m always lecturing my clients, telling them, look ... if you just follow the right path, then everything’s going to be OK. He wasn’t doing anything wrong, and he still was killed.”</p> <p>First McCoy felt sad, then angry. Finally she decided, “I can’t just have a pity party about this,” she says. “What am I going to do?”</p> <p>McCoy has worked as a criminal defense attorney in Michigan for 15 years. Since 2014 she has collaborated with Judge Deborah Thomas of the Third Circuit Court on public presentations about expungement. Thomas explains, from a judge’s perspective, how to clear a criminal record; McCoy goes over the actual application. It’s valuable work—and McCoy still does it—but even better, she says, would be teaching people “how to avoid catching a case” in the first place.</p> <p>Like many defense attorneys, McCoy was weary of trying to help clients who had consented to a search or given a confession. “Don’t give a statement,” she says. “A lot of times I have clients who ... get tricked into making a statement. They get manipulated, and then that helps to seal their fate.” There is only so much she can do, she says, when her clients have given away their rights.</p> <p>In February 2015, she organized her first workshop, “What to Do When Stopped by the Police,” at New Hope Baptist Church in Ann Arbor. Speakers included the Washtenaw County sheriff, the Ann Arbor police chief, the Washtenaw County prosecutor, a public defender, a criminal defense attorney, and an American Civil Liberties Union attorney. “I felt like all of the players in the process needed to be there,” McCoy says. Despite frigid temperatures, 100 people showed up.</p> <p>Over the past year, McCoy has organized similar presentations at high schools and elsewhere: five in Detroit, three in Washtenaw County (which includes Ann Arbor and Ypsilanti). Some of the workshops, like the one at Detroit’s Henry Ford High School, are archived on <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p8v-hKGfX4k" target="_blank">YouTube</a>.</p> <p>Almost every speaker at Henry Ford gives a version of the same basic advice: Be polite. Be respectful. Think before you act. Many of them do so by telling about their own experiences with police while off duty or when they were teens. One police detective uses a slideshow, and a generous serving of edgy humor, to explain to students what to do if they’re stopped while driving—and what not to do. “Don’t bribe us with money or doughnuts,” he says, drawing laughs.</p> <p>Also covered: knowing what your rights are, and your resources if those rights are violated. “Who polices the police?” the US attorney for Michigan’s Eastern District asked the Henry Ford students. “I do. … When you believe that a police officer has violated your civil rights, I want to know about it.” She goes on to explain the criminal and civil statutes her office enforces. The next speaker, Judge Thomas, gives the students pocket-sized cards outlining their rights as citizens.</p> <p>McCoy’s cast of presenters continues to evolve, based on what audiences tell her. “Look, Ms. McCoy, it’s good that you’re educating us,” she’s heard students say. “It’s good that you’re letting us know what to do, but what are the police doing?” So she began including more information on police accountability.</p> <p>McCoy is a partner with <a href="http://www.mccoyandassociates.com" target="_blank">McCoy &amp; Associates</a>, founded by her father, Robert McCoy; she first worked there at 14, filing documents and answering phones. (Her father, who grew up in a family of 16 in Benton Harbor, Michigan, was inspired to become a lawyer by watching Perry Mason.) Robyn McCoy considered becoming a nurse like her mother “for five minutes,” she says. Then “I went to the hospital with her and walked past the morgue.”</p> <p>At UChicago she majored in anthropology and cofounded Sistafriends, a networking group for African American women that was active for about 10 years. One of her mentors was the founding director of the University Community Service Center, Michelle Obama. Obama offered advice on law school and encouraged McCoy to take her husband’s class. But McCoy’s father wanted her to graduate early, so she just sat in rather than formally enrolling. She still ribs him: “Dad, you told me not to take the class with the first black president!”</p> <p>After earning her law degree at the University of Michigan, McCoy worked at the<a href="http://www.ladadetroit.org" target="_blank"> Legal Aid and Defender Association</a> and several firms, including her father’s. Since 2007 she has served as an attorney for the <a href="http://www.miclc.org" target="_blank">Michigan Children’s Law Center</a> in Detroit, advocating for children in neglect and abuse cases and in delinquency cases.</p> <p>With school out, McCoy spent the summer planning where she will give her presentations next academic year. Some people have advised her to start a nonprofit, others to write a book.</p> <p>In the black community, McCoy says, “generally, I know that most people would say they’re scared of the police.” She had that fear herself growing up. But when she brings police officers into schools, sometimes students want to know, “What does it take to become a police officer?”</p> <p>So McCoy put together a resource list and asked police recruiters to attend the programs. In the short term, her program helps young people stay safe. In the longer term, it might bring about a more significant change. If there’s more diversity on the force, McCoy says, “that can definitely change the culture.”</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/law-policy-society" hreflang="en">Law, Policy &amp; Society</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/law-enforcement" hreflang="en">Law Enforcement</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/police-stops" hreflang="en">Police stops</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refuchicago field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/college-alumni" hreflang="en">College alumni</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-relatedstories field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>“<a href="http://magazine.uchicago.edu/0701/chicago_journal/policing_the_police.shtml" target="_blank">Policing the police</a>” (<em>University of Chicago Magazine</em>, Nov–Dec/07)</p> <p>“<a href="http://mag.uchicago.edu/law-policy-society/share-and-protect" target="_blank">Share and protect</a>” (<em>University of Chicago Magazine</em>, Fall/15)</p> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/law-policy-society/legal-advice" data-a2a-title="Legal advice "><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Flaw-policy-society%2Flegal-advice&amp;title=Legal%20advice%20"></a></span> Wed, 27 Jul 2016 18:57:36 +0000 Anonymous 5883 at https://mag.uchicago.edu Shared objectives https://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/shared-objectives <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/1506_Shared-objectives_0.png" width="1000" height="464" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/jmiller" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">jmiller</span></span> <span>Wed, 05/06/2015 - 13:34</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Ivy on Rosenwald. (<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/ironypoisoning/6571832483/" target="_blank">Photography</a> by Connie Ma, CC BY-SA 2.0)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/news-office-staff"> <a href="/author/news-office-staff"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">News Office Staff</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/university-chicago-news-office" hreflang="en">University of Chicago News Office</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item">May–June/15</div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>University of Chicago Police takes steps to enhance transparency and public access to information.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>After an extensive process that included discussions with local residents, elected officials, and stakeholders across campus, the University is taking significant steps to enhance the transparency of the activities of the <a href="http://safety-security.uchicago.edu/police/" target="_blank">University of Chicago Police Department</a> (UCPD). The University also will streamline online access to law enforcement information that is already public.</p> <p>The changes go beyond the requirements of Illinois law for police forces at private institutions. As of June 2015, the UCPD will post details about all traffic stops and field contacts the UCPD performs. The daily online updates will include the date, time, location, reason for the stop, disposition, whether a search was conducted, and the race and gender of the person stopped.</p> <p>In addition, the UCPD will make details available upon request from records of arrests made by UCPD officers. The <a href="http://safety-security.uchicago.edu" target="_blank">University’s Safety and Security website</a> will provide easier access to UCPD information that has been available but was not collected in one place online. The site also will have additional background information about how the department fulfills its duties.</p> <p>“Public safety requires effective partnerships among community members and the police,” said <a href="https://president.uchicago.edu/directory/derek-r-b-douglas" target="_blank">Derek R. B. Douglas</a>, vice president for civic engagement. “Meetings with community members and public officials helped lead to a reevaluation of how we share information. We are grateful for their help and look forward to continued conversations with our neighbors about a wide range of safety issues.”</p> <p>Douglas said that in addition to the planned changes, the University will explore additional opportunities for the community to communicate directly with the UCPD. In collaboration with a range of stakeholders, the University will strive to build a model of engagement for private university police departments sharing information with the communities they serve.</p> <p>“The University of Chicago is committed to working closely with members of our communities to maintain safety and foster an atmosphere of trust,” said <a href="http://www.margolishealy.com/about/bio/marlon_c._lynch/" target="_blank">Marlon C. Lynch</a>, associate vice president for safety, security, and civic affairs, and chief of police. “The University decided to go beyond the law’s requirements in order to encourage dialogue and feedback that will allow us to serve the community most effectively.”</p> <p>Many individuals and groups have offered constructive ideas related to the policy changes, including Illinois state representatives <a href="http://www.barbaraflynncurrie.org" target="_blank">Barbara Flynn Currie</a>, LAB’58, AB’68, AM’73, and <a href="http://www.friendsofchristianmitchell.com" target="_blank">Christian Mitchell</a>, AB’08, and local aldermen <a href="http://www.aldwillburns.org" target="_blank">Will Burns</a>, AB’95, AM’98 (4th Ward); <a href="http://the20thward.com/alderman-cochrans-biography/" target="_blank">Willie B. Cochran</a> (20th Ward); <a href="http://www.dowellfor3rdward.com" target="_blank">Pat Dowell</a>, AM’80 (3rd Ward); and <a href="http://www.leslieahairston.com" target="_blank">Leslie Hairston</a>, LAB’79 (5th Ward). Input from the broader community on the South Side played an important role. At UChicago, the Campaign for Equitable Policing, leaders in Student Government, and faculty members worked with the UCPD to help move the discussion forward.</p> <p>The University already provides information on UCPD activities through a variety of channels. On- and off-campus incidents reported to UCPD are compiled into a daily crime and fire log and are posted on the UCPD website. The site also provides summaries of individual complaints made against UCPD officers and includes the analyses and recommendations of the University’s Independent Review Committee concerning those complaints. In addition, UCPD reports traffic stop information to the <a href="http://www.idot.illinois.gov" target="_blank">Illinois Department of Transportation</a>; aggregate traffic stop information is available on the IDOT website. Because the <a href="http://www.cityofchicago.org/city/en/depts/cpd.html" target="_blank">Chicago Police Department</a> is the investigative agency for criminal incidents that occur off campus, those reports are available from the CPD upon request.</p> <p>Although such information is publicly available, it is not always easy to access. New web pages on the UCPD site will gather more of this information in one place, along with other supporting material:</p> <ul><li>The University will provide and publicize additional background information related to current UCPD practices, including the statutes that serve as the legal basis for UCPD’s authority; the responsibilities of the department; a description of UCPD officer training; and information on how the UCPD operates in conjunction with CPD.</li> <li>The University will provide more specific information regarding traffic stops and field contacts, outside of the aggregate information provided by IDOT. This information will be updated daily and will include the date, time, location, reason for the stop, disposition, whether a search was conducted, and the race and gender of the individual.</li> <li>The University will provide upon request arrest record information, similar to the information provided by public law enforcement agencies. Specifically, the information disclosed will include identifying information of the arrestee (such as name, age, address, and photograph); arrest charges; time and location of the arrest; name of the investigating or arresting law enforcement agency; amount of bail or bond; and details on incarceration.</li> <li>The University will develop a list of frequently asked questions and responses compiled from extensive conversations with both the University community and neighboring communities. The University will seek feedback on the FAQs from community groups.</li> </ul><p>The UCPD is a professionally trained police department with approximately 100 state-certified officers, accredited by the <a href="http://www.calea.org" target="_blank">Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies</a>. The areas served by the UCPD extend from 37th to 64th Streets, and are bounded by Lake Shore Drive on the east and Cottage Grove Avenue on the west, excluding <a href="http://www.chicagoparkdistrict.com/parks/jackson-park/" target="_blank">Jackson Park</a>.</p> <p>The UCPD’s jurisdiction has developed in response to community needs and requests from community leaders for the University to play a role in public safety and other issues of concern to residents. The City of Chicago expanded the UCPD’s patrol area at the request of the community and University. More information on services provided by the UCPD is available at safety-<a href="http://security.uchicaog.edu" target="_blank">security.uchicago.edu</a>.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/university-news" hreflang="en">University News</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/law-enforcement" hreflang="en">Law Enforcement</a></div> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/university-news/shared-objectives" data-a2a-title="Shared objectives"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Funiversity-news%2Fshared-objectives&amp;title=Shared%20objectives"></a></span> Wed, 06 May 2015 18:34:38 +0000 jmiller 4646 at https://mag.uchicago.edu Crime stats https://mag.uchicago.edu/law-policy-society/crime-stats <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/1312_Tsang_Crime-stats.png" width="700" height="325" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/jmiller" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">jmiller</span></span> <span>Tue, 11/12/2013 - 12:44</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Chicago police in Hyde Park. (<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/53326337@N00/3003237154" target="_blank">Photography</a> by Quinn Dombrowski, AB’06, AM’06/CC BY-SA 2.0) (Graphic courtesy Daniel Hertz; adapted by Joy Olivia Miller)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/derek-tsang-ab15"> <a href="/author/derek-tsang-ab15"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Derek Tsang, AB’15</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/university-chicago-magazine" hreflang="en">The University of Chicago Magazine</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item">Nov–Dec/13</div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>A decline in the murder rate has been uneven in Chicago, increasing the gap between different parts of the city.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Chicago, says Harris School student Daniel Hertz, is neither the nation’s murder capital nor “Chiraq,” the nickname given to it in a recent HBO documentary. For his own interest, Hertz analyzed the Chicago Police Department’s data on homicides and reported the results in an August 5 post on his blog, City Notes, that went viral. The city’s overall murder rate, he found, dropped by nearly half between the early 1990s and the late 2000s, from 30 deaths per 100,000 citizens to 17. “For a couple of years, we had the highest number of murders” in the country, Hertz says. But even during the peak years of the early 1990s, Chicago was “nowhere close to having the highest murder rate.” The declines were substantial on the North Side, while the South and West Sides saw less change. The eight safest police districts—downtown and seven districts north of it—have an average rate of 3.3 per 100,000. “In New York City, which is constantly (and mostly correctly) being held up as proof that urban safety miracles can happen in America, it’s 6.3,” Hertz writes. “The North Side is <em>unbelievably safe</em>, at least as far as murder goes.” Despite belonging to one of Chicago’s more violent districts, Hyde Park itself parallels the North Side, with an average murder rate of 3.6 per 100,000 for 2008–11. Looking at the data for individual police districts, though, Hertz found that the decline in murder rates has been anything but even. The gap between the haven of the North Side versus the West and South Sides—which give Chicago its reputation—has roughly tripled in the past two decades, says Hertz. “In the early ’90s, the most dangerous third of the city had about six times as many murders as the safest third,” he writes. “By the late 2000s, the most dangerous part of the city had nearly <em>fifteen times more homicides</em> than the safest third.” Seven districts have even seen an increase in homicides, including Chicago Lawn and Morgan Park, which saw 1990–93 averages of 9 and 17 deaths per 100,000, respectively, creep up to 13 and 17 deaths per 100,000 over 2008–11. Even though absolute murder rates have dropped across Chicago, the growing inequality of violence has its own set of consequences. “There are studies to prove that reputation has as much or bigger an effect on the economic development of a neighborhood than the actual crime rate,” Hertz says. “And reputations are based on relative status.” <a name="infographic" id="infographic"></a></p> <h5>Change in homicide rates</h5> <p>[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_original","fid":"1016","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"520","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"460"}}]]  </p> <h5>Ratios of homicide rates to city averages</h5> <p>[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_original","fid":"1017","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"520","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"460"}}]] [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_original","fid":"1018","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"520","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"460"}}]]</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/law-policy-society" hreflang="en">Law, Policy &amp; Society</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/city-chicago" hreflang="en">City of Chicago</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/violence" hreflang="en">Violence</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/law-enforcement" hreflang="en">Law Enforcement</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refformats field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/formats/fig-1" hreflang="en">Fig. 1</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-storymedia field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><h2 class="media-icon media-icon-infographic">Infographic</h2> <p><img src="http://magazine.uchicago.edu/1312/1312_Tsang_Crime-stats_spotD.png"></p> <p>City of Chicago police district maps showing the change in homicide rates (left) and the ratios of homicide rates to city averages (right).</p> <p><a href="#infographic" class="more-link">VIEW LARGER INFOGRAPHIC</a> </p> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/law-policy-society/crime-stats" data-a2a-title="Crime stats"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Flaw-policy-society%2Fcrime-stats&amp;title=Crime%20stats"></a></span> Tue, 12 Nov 2013 18:44:49 +0000 jmiller 2556 at https://mag.uchicago.edu