Latin America https://mag.uchicago.edu/tags/latin-america en The unintended consequence of mandatory child care https://mag.uchicago.edu/law-policy-society/unintended-consequence-mandatory-child-care-chile <span><span lang="" about="/profile/jmiller" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">jmiller</span></span> <span>Thu, 06/25/2015 - 09:51</span> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/cheryl-healy-mpp15"> <a href="/author/cheryl-healy-mpp15"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Cheryl Healy, MPP’15</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/chicago-policy-review" hreflang="en">Chicago Policy Review</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item"><p>06.23.2015</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item">Chile has one of the lowest female labor-force participation rates in Latin America. So in an effort to bring more mothers into the workforce, a policy was introduced requiring firms to provide childcare. But that's not all it did.</div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/law-policy-society" hreflang="en">Law, Policy &amp; Society</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/chile" hreflang="en">Chile</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/children" hreflang="en">Children</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/parenting" hreflang="en">Parenting</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/child-care" hreflang="en">Child care</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/latin-america" hreflang="en">Latin America</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refuchicago field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/chicago-harris" hreflang="en">Harris Public Policy</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-story-ext-link field--type-link field--label-hidden field--item">The unintended consequence of mandatory child care in Chile <a href="http://chicagopolicyreview.org/2015/06/23/the-unintended-consequence-of-mandatory-child-care-in-chile/">http://chicagopolicyreview.org/2015/06/23/the-unintended-consequence-of-mandato…</a></div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/law-policy-society/unintended-consequence-mandatory-child-care-chile" data-a2a-title="The unintended consequence of mandatory child care"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Flaw-policy-society%2Funintended-consequence-mandatory-child-care-chile&amp;title=The%20unintended%20consequence%20of%20mandatory%20child%20care"></a></span> Thu, 25 Jun 2015 14:51:04 +0000 jmiller 4783 at https://mag.uchicago.edu International enterprise https://mag.uchicago.edu/law-policy-society/international-enterprise <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/1412_Zulkey_International-enterprise.png" width="700" height="325" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/jmiller" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">jmiller</span></span> <span>Tue, 12/02/2014 - 13:44</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>The government of Mexico awarded Friedrich Katz (seen above in 2000) the order of the Aztec Eagle, the highest award given to foreigners. (Photo courtesy the Katz Center for Mexican Studies)</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/claire-zulkey"> <a href="/author/claire-zulkey"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Claire Zulkey</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/dialogo" hreflang="en">Dialogo</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item">Fall 2014/Winter 2015</div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>UChicago honors its Latin American research roots.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>When the <a href="https://mexicanstudies.uchicago.edu/page/xiv-reunión-internacional-de-historiadores-de-méxico" target="_blank">International Reunion of Historians of Mexico</a> was held in Querétaro in 2010, the event’s Mexican constituents named <a href="https://mexicanstudies.uchicago.edu/page/friedrichkatz" target="_blank">Friedrich Katz</a>, the Morton D. Hull Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus of History, conference president. The honor, says history professor <a href="https://history.uchicago.edu/directory/emilio-h-kour%C3%AD" target="_blank">Emilio Kourí</a>, was akin to declaring Katz an honorary Mexican citizen.</p> <p>Katz, author of the seminal book <em><a href="https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/700267.The_Life_and_Times_of_Pancho_Villa?from_search=true" target="_blank">The&nbsp;Life and Times of Pancho Villa</a></em> (Stanford University Press, 1998), died shortly before the conference took place, but the legacy of his career lives on at the <a href="https://mexicanstudies.uchicago.edu" target="_blank">Katz Center for Mexican Studies</a>, established in 2004. Katz not only studied Mexico but also empowered Mexican academics, says Kourí, “His love of Mexico was institutionalized at the University of Chicago.”</p> <p>The conference, which meets every four years, was held at the University in September for the second time since 1981—the first time it’s repeated a US location—marking the <a href="http://news.uchicago.edu/article/2014/09/19/distinguished-international-scholars-mexican-history-gather-discuss-past-and-futu" target="_blank">Katz&nbsp;Center’s 10th anniversary</a>. The University’s history of Latin American studies also was celebrated with a <a href="http://www.lib.uchicago.edu/e/scrc/" target="_blank">Special Collections Research&nbsp;Center</a> exhibit, <a href="http://news.lib.uchicago.edu/blog/2014/06/19/researching-mexico-university-of-chicago-field-explorations-in-mexico-1896-2014/" target="_blank"><em>Researching Mexico: University&nbsp;</em><em>of Chicago Field Explorations in Mexico, 1896–2014</em></a>, which ran June 30–October 4. Cocurated by Seonaid Valiant, AM’01, CER’13, PhD’14 (History), and Kathleen Feeney, head of archives processing at the Special Collections Research Center, the exhibit included photographs, letters, and artifacts showing how historians like Katz and early anthropologists such as Frederick Starr; Robert Redfield, LAB 1915, PhB’20, JD’21, PhD’28 (Anthropology); and Norman McQuown helped establish the social sciences at the University and made UChicago a leader in <a href="https://clas.uchicago.edu" target="_blank">Latin American studies</a>.</p> <p>These scholars’ pursuit of knowledge of Mexico was an international enterprise. More than at other institutions, Kourí says, “Chicago was spared the colonial gaze of the early anthropologists, although it wasn’t entirely absent.” Redfield became interested in Mexico after observing that many citizens had migrated to Chicago. He wanted to explore why, and how immigration changed their culture. He and other University scholars “really partnered with Mexicans,” Kourí says. “They were equals.” Kourí points to Alfonso Villa Rojas and Manuel Gamio, Mexican anthropologists who worked with UChicago researchers.</p> <p>The center continues to pursue its mission of advancing research and promoting intellectual issues relating to Mexico, hosting Tinker visiting professors and senior faculty members from <a href="http://www.colmex.mx" target="_blank">El Colegio de México</a>, publishing works by UChicago history scholars and collaborators in Mexico, and sponsoring public lectures. As the University looks for new opportunities to expand its partnerships with Latin American institutions, Kourí says, the Division remains dedicated to “its commitment to engaging our international presence.”</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p> <h5>[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_original","fid":"2145","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"321","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"460"}}]]<br /> Robert Redfield, shown above with his family in Mexico, 1929, decided on a career in anthropology after his initial fieldwork in 1926. (Special Collections Research Center, University of Chicago Library)</h5> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p> <h5>[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_original","fid":"2144","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"634","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"460"}}]]<br /> Frederick Starr, the first University professor to consider himself an anthropologist, had a custom bookplate designed that incorporated iconic spiritual and political images from Mexico. (Special Collections Research Center, University of Chicago Library)</h5> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p> <h5>[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_original","fid":"2146","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"648","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"460"}}]]<br /> In 1916 Frederick Starr documented Mexican carnival participants. (Special Collections Research Center, University of Chicago Library)</h5> <p>&nbsp;</p> <h5>[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_original","fid":"2147","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"680","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"460"}}]]<br /> Anthropologist Robert Redfield collected mexican broadsheets called <em>corridos</em> (circa 1920) during his fieldwork there. (Special Collections Research Center, University of Chicago Library)</h5> <p>&nbsp;</p> <h5>[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_original","fid":"2148","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"420","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"460"}}]]<br /> Anthropologist Robert Redfield also kept a journal documenting his interviews of Mexicans in Chicago. (Special Collections Research Center, University of Chicago Library)</h5> <p>&nbsp;</p> <h5>[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_original","fid":"2149","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"234","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"460"}}]]<br /> Anthropologist and linguist Norman McQuown documented Mexican and Central American indigenous languages. This 1939 chart of Totonac grammar is among the materials he compiled as part of an educational project at&nbsp;Mexico City children’s homes. (Special Collections Research Center, University of Chicago Library)</h5> <p>&nbsp;</p> <h5>[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_original","fid":"2150","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"783","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"460"}}]]<br /> A 1923–24 journal of Robert Redfield’s illustrates his interest in Mexican migration to Chicago. (Special Collections Research Center, University of Chicago Library)</h5> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/law-policy-society" hreflang="en">Law, Policy &amp; Society</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/latin-america" hreflang="en">Latin America</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/mexico" hreflang="en">Mexico</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/anthropology" hreflang="en">Anthropology</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/history" hreflang="en">History</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refuchicago field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/division-social-sciences" hreflang="en">Division of the Social Sciences</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/library-0" hreflang="en">Library</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/special-collections-research-center-0" hreflang="en">Special Collections Research Center</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-relatedstories field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>“<a href="../arts-humanities/torch-songs" target="_self">Torch Songs</a>” (<em>University of Chicago Magazine</em>, Sept–Oct/14) “<a href="../economics-business/bridge-latin-america" target="_self">A Bridge to Latin America</a>” (<em>Dialogo</em>, Spring–Summer/12) “<a href="http://magazine.uchicago.edu/1108/chicago_journal/man-of-many-worlds.shtml" target="_blank">Man of Many Worlds</a>” (<em>University of Chicago Magazine</em>, July–Aug/11)   <a href="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/Dialogo_Fall2014-Winter2015.pdf">[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_original","fid":"2159","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"259","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"200"}}]]</a></p> <h5>This article originally appeared in the Fall 2014/Winter 2015 issue of <em>Dialogo</em>, the biannual publication for University of Chicago Division of the Social Sciences alumni.</h5> <div class="issue-link"><a href="../dialogo-archive" target="_self">VIEW ALL <em>DIALOGO</em> STORIES</a></div> <div class="issue-link"><a href="http://mag.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/Dialogo_Fall2014-Winter2015.pdf">DOWNLOAD THE LATEST ISSUE (PDF)</a></div> <div class="issue-link"><a href="http://socialsciences.uchicago.edu/alumni" target="_blank">READ ADDITIONAL SSD NEWS</a></div> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/law-policy-society/international-enterprise" data-a2a-title="International enterprise"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Flaw-policy-society%2Finternational-enterprise&amp;title=International%20enterprise"></a></span> Tue, 02 Dec 2014 19:44:50 +0000 jmiller 4196 at https://mag.uchicago.edu A bridge to Latin America https://mag.uchicago.edu/economics-business/bridge-latin-america <div class="field field--name-field-letter-box-story-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/1411_Dialogo-placeholder_21.jpg" width="700" height="325" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/profile/jmiller" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">jmiller</span></span> <span>Thu, 11/20/2014 - 16:35</span> <div class="field field--name-field-caption field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><!-- Alfredo Jocelyn-Holt presents his work on student protests in Chile. (Photography by Jason Smith) //--></div> <div class="field field--name-field-refauthors field--type-entity-reference field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field--label sr-only">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"> <div about="/author/elizabeth-station"> <a href="/author/elizabeth-station"> <div class="field field--name-name field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Elizabeth Station</div> </a> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refsource field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/publication-sources/dialogo" hreflang="en">Dialogo</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-issue field--type-text field--label-hidden field--item">Spring/Summer 2012</div> <div class="field field--name-field-subhead field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>For over three decades, Tinker professors have created connections with Chicago.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>More than 100 distinguished scholars of Latin America, Spain, and Portugal have helped build enduring connections to Chicago through the Tinker Visiting Professor program, which marked its 30th anniversary in 2011–12.&nbsp;</p> <p>Having the chance to teach and pursue research at the University has proven valuable to participating scholars in different ways.</p> <p>Alfredo Jocelyn-Holt has written many influential books on Chilean history, but he never taught a course that compared independence movements throughout Latin America until his stint as a Tinker professor. Spending time on campus this past winter quarter was intriguing for another reason, too.</p> <p>“The University of Chicago sparks the imagination of any Chilean because of the Chicago Boys,” says Jocelyn-Holt. Economists trained by UChicago faculty beginning in the 1950s, the Chicago Boys had broad influence in Chile and “were highly revolutionary in terms of their economic mentality, so you are always curious about what the institution is like from an inside point of view.”</p> <p>Gerardo Esquivel, an economist from the Colegio de Mexico, writes a popular blog called&nbsp;<em>El placer de disentir</em>&nbsp;(The pleasure of dissenting) and served as an economic adviser to Mexican presidential candidate Andrés Manuel López Obrador. He says his 2010–11 Tinker professorship gave him a chance to work on book-length projects and teach a course on Mexico’s political economy for the first time in his career.</p> <p>Tinker professors are usually prominent academics, but the program has also attracted activists, artists, and writers. Alma Guillermoprieto taught three classes on recent Latin American history, revisiting revolutions and civil conflicts she had covered as a reporter. Spending time at the University, she says, “allowed me to systematize the knowledge and experience I’d acquired in the course of 30 years as a journalist.”</p> <p>Such stories only hint at the returns on an investment made in 1981, when the Edward Larocque Tinker Foundation established the program with a grant to the Center for Latin American Studies (CLAS). The foundation supported similar short-term residencies at Columbia, Stanford, the University of Texas at Austin, and the University of Wisconsin–Madison. They shared a common goal: to expose US students and faculty to Latin American perspectives and foster cross-cultural and cross-disciplinary ties.</p> <div> <p><em>Mauricio Tenorio contributes to the conversation. Photo by Jason Smith</em></p> </div> <div> <p>Tinker professors are nominated by Chicago faculty and hosted by departments across the University for a quarter or more. Those chosen are “the best scholars of the Americas and the Iberian world,” says history professor and CLAS director Mauricio Tenorio. In all, CLAS has welcomed 103 visiting professors from 18 different academic disciplines and ten countries: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, Nicaragua, Peru, Portugal, Spain, and Venezuela.&nbsp;</p> </div> <p>Most teach courses in the social sciences and humanities, drawing graduate and undergraduate students from such fields as economics, history, anthropology, political science, international relations, music, and Romance languages and literatures. The Harris School of Public Policy and the Biological Sciences Division have also hosted Tinker scholars, a trend that Tenorio expects to continue.</p> <p>Tenorio believes the program offers equal value to visiting professors and the University. Any senior scholar from Latin America, Spain, or Portugal “is aware of the debates in the United States and yet doesn’t have access to the libraries, dialogues, workshops, conferences, and data banks that we have here,” he says. “So it’s a win-win situation: they come; they inevitably confront us with our parochialism, and at the same time they benefit enormously from the resources of the University.”</p> <p>Jocelyn-Holt worked on two books while at Chicago, including a memoir focusing on the 2011 student protests at the University of Chile, his home institution. Teaching courses and sharing his research in progress was “incredibly valuable,” he says. “It allows you to think over things that you think are obvious—but they’re not so obvious if you’re presenting them in a different environment, to different people.”</p> <p>Over three decades, the Tinker Foundation’s original $750,000 grant has grown into an endowment worth more than $7 million. Those resources have made it possible for CLAS to organize conferences and underwrite publications with former Tinker professors and their Chicago colleagues as collaborators.</p> <p>A 2009 University conference on environmental policy, social movements, and science in the Brazilian Amazon followed residencies by three former Tinker professors from Brazil—Mary Helena Allegretti, Mauro Barbosa de Almeida, and Ricardo Paes de Barros. The three have created enduring relationships with Chicago faculty and opened their networks to students pursuing research in Brazil on related topics.</p> <p>Scholars of Mexico have collaborated for three different Tinker-funded conferences, including a 2007 gathering on land, politics, and revolution that honored emeritus history professor Friedrich Katz. He died in 2010, but the project generated a book,&nbsp;<em>Revolución y exilio en la historia de México</em>&nbsp;(Ediciones Era, 2010), to which several former Tinker professors contributed.&nbsp;</p> <p>By bringing eminent Latin American intellectuals to campus, the program adds a distinctive component to the training of Chicago graduate students. Tinker professors advise students’ theses and dissertations; they might even be called upon to write letters of recommendation. But most important, they offer perspectives and contacts that can point young researchers in valuable new directions.</p> <p>Patrick Iber, PhD’11 (History), worked as a teaching assistant for Guillermoprieto while writing his dissertation. “She covered, as a journalist, events which I had only read about in texts and documents,” he says. Tapping her extensive professional network, she put him in touch with others who could talk to him about his work.&nbsp;</p> <div> <p>Perhaps the program’s most vital contribution is how it has exposed Chicago faculty and students to new ways of thinking.</div> <p>Iber also connected with the Chilean novelist and diplomat Jorge Edwards, who came as a Tinker professor twice—in 1990–91 and 2009. “Because I write about Latin American intellectuals during the Cold War, Jorge Edwards actually appears as a ‘character’ in my dissertation,” says Iber. “It was extraordinary to be able to talk to him.” Iber did an interview with Edwards that was published by the Chicago Review and the prestigious Mexican journal Letras Libres, and they remain in touch.</p> <p>“With this wave of scholars coming every year, we have established channels and bridges that have benefited our students enormously,” says Tenorio. “They serve as ambassadors for our students,” steering them toward archives, people, and approaches that guide students’ research.</p> <p>Perhaps the program’s most vital contribution is how it has exposed Chicago faculty and students to new ways of thinking. Many works by leading social scientists from Latin America, Portugal, and Spain are never translated into English. As a result, says Tenorio, academics who don’t read other languages may be unfamiliar with important theoretical scholarship from the region.</p> <p>Those barriers break down when faculty and students can meet and discuss ideas in person, whether they’re analyzing race in contemporary Brazil, economic reforms in Chile, or legal thought in 19th-century Mexico.</p> <p>“The Tinker professors are fundamental,” says Tenorio, “because it’s like bringing the books here to speak.”</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-reftopic field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="/topics/economics-business" hreflang="en">Economics &amp; Business</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/latin-america" hreflang="en">Latin America</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/spain" hreflang="en">Spain</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/tags/portugal" hreflang="en">Portugal</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-refuchicago field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/division-social-sciences" hreflang="en">Division of the Social Sciences</a></div> </div> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="https://mag.uchicago.edu/economics-business/bridge-latin-america" data-a2a-title="A bridge to Latin America"><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_google_plus"></a><a class="a2a_button_print"></a><a class="a2a_dd addtoany_share_save" href="https://www.addtoany.com/share#url=https%3A%2F%2Fmag.uchicago.edu%2Feconomics-business%2Fbridge-latin-america&amp;title=A%20bridge%20to%20Latin%20America"></a></span> Thu, 20 Nov 2014 22:35:09 +0000 jmiller 4131 at https://mag.uchicago.edu